Cases reported "Food Hypersensitivity"

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1/42. The effect of orally administered sodium cromoglycate on allergic reactions caused by food allergens.

    In five patients who exhibited allergic reactions, four with asthma and one with angioneurotic oedema, to orally administered soybean flour, the protective effect of orally administered sodium cromoglycate has been investigated. Protection from reactions in soybean provocation tests has been achieved with doses ranging from 400 mg to 600 mg given four times daily.
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2/42. Lupine-induced anaphylaxis.

    BACKGROUND: Legumes are one of the most common foods causing allergic reactions in children and adults. Cross-reacting antibodies are frequently demonstrated in this family but the real clinical cross-reactivity is uncommon. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of lupine-induced anaphylaxis and to elucidate in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity with some legumes. methods: skin prick test (SPT) with some legumes were performed. Cap-IgE, ELISA-IgE, and immunoblotting were carried out. Open oral challenges with some legumes were performed. Cross-reactivity was studied by ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition. RESULTS: The results demonstrated type-I hypersensitivity reactions with lupine and some other legumes. Cap-IgE with peanut was positive but the SPT and ELISA-IgE were negative and the patient tolerated a peanut challenge. ELISA inhibition revealed a partial inhibition (62%) using lupine as the solid phase. Partial inhibition was demonstrated by immunoblotting inhibition. Open oral challenge with peanut and green bean were negative but positive with pea. CONCLUSION: We present a lupine sensitized patient with positive SPT and in vitro cross-reactivity with other legumes. Clinical cross-reactivity progressively developed over a 5-year period. Discrepancies were found between the clinical aspect and in vitro study of peanut allergy. Factors determining the wide variability in cross-reactivity among individuals are still obscure.
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3/42. vitamin d deficiency rickets due to inappropriate feeding: report of one case.

    vitamin d deficiency rickets is rare among infants and children in the industrialized countries. In this paper, we report a 2-year-5-month-old girl with aching and bowed legs. A food allergy with atopic dermatitis was diagnosed since her early infancy. Strict dietary restrictions were done and she was mostly fed soybean juice and rice foods. Fortified soybean formula (Isomil) was introduced one month before admission. vitamin d deficiency rickets was diagnosed by a history of inappropriate feeding, roentgenographic and laboratory findings. The therapeutic regimen included 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol 0.5 ug/day and calcium carbonate 100 mg/kg/day. Extensive nutritional counseling was also given for correction of aberrant dietary practices. After a one-year follow-up, there was radiological evidence of bone healing, and marked improvement of leg deformities.
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4/42. asthma and rhinitis induced by exposure to raw green beans and chards.

    BACKGROUND: Although the vast majority of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods occurs through ingestion, a few cases of unexpected allergic reactions to foods may occur through the exposure to airborne food allergen particles. methods: case reports. skin prick tests and serum-specific IgE (CAP-FEIA) were used to identify specific IgE antibodies. bronchial provocation tests were performed to determine the clinical relevance of inhaled exposure to raw and cooked green beans and raw chards. After demonstrating specific reactivity to them, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting of raw and cooked green beans were carried out to identify relevant antigens. RESULTS: Three women developed bronchial asthma and rhinitis after exposure to raw green beans, and one of them also when exposed to raw chards. All women tolerated ingestion of green beans. patients reported multiple episodes while handling these vegetables for cooking activities. Allergy to green beans and chards was demonstrated by skin testing and serum-specific IgE. Bronchial challenge test with these allergens showed positive responses to raw, but not cooked, green beans and chards. Oral food challenges with green beans (raw and cooked) and chards were negative in all patients. In order to further characterize the allergenic components of these extracts, SDS-PAGE and electroblotting studies were also performed. Immunoblots of raw and cooked green beans extract showed two IgE-binding bands with apparent molecular weights of 41.1 and 70.6 kD. Interestingly, a 47-kD IgE-binding protein was detected only in raw green bean extracts. CONCLUSIONS: We report three patients who developed asthma and rhinitis caused by exposure to raw, but not to cooked, green beans and chards in a non-occupational environment. Only minor differences of IgE reactivity between nitrocellulose-blotted raw and boiled green bean extract were found.
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5/42. A case of allergy to beer showing cross-reactivity between lipid transfer proteins.

    BACKGROUND: Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are highly conserved proteins present in a broad spectrum of fruits and vegetables that might represent a novel plant panallergen. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that LTP is an important allergen in beer and that beer LTP cross-reacts with LTP from botanically unrelated plant-derived foods. methods: serum from a patient with clinical allergy to both beer and rosaceae was studied for IgE reactivity to LTP to several vegetable foods by RAST, ELISA, immunoblot, and inhibition studies. RESULTS: Patient's serum showed a strong IgE reactivity to LTP purified from peach peel, carrot, and broccoli, and to a 10 kD protein in both apple and peach immunoblots, whereas no reactivity to birch cross-reactive allergens such as Bet v 1, profilin, or carbohydrates was found. In inhibition studies, preabsorption of serum with apple, walnut, hazelnut, peanut, corn, and rice caused a fall of 97%, 20%, 66%, 91%, 94%, and 93%, respectively, of its reactivity to peach LTP. beer RAST fell from 1.8 IU/mL to <0.1 IU/mL when a patient's serum was preabsorbed with recombinant carrot LTP. CONCLUSIONS: LTP is a relevant allergen in beer. beer LTP may cross-react with LTP from several other plant-derived foods.
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6/42. Fatal buckwheat dependent exercised-induced anaphylaxis.

    Cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FEA) caused by buckwheat have been rare. Clinical, laboratory, and autopsy findings are present on an 8-year old girl with FEA caused by Japanese buckwheat. The patient consumed buckwheat noodles called "zaru soba" and immediately thereafter swam vigorously. Approximately 30 minutes later, she complained of abdominal pain, vomiting, coughing, and chest discomfort. Another ten minutes later her consciousness level deteriorated and she experienced cardiorespiratory arrest. The heart beat was restored and she was admitted to the hospital. She never regained consciousness and expired after another arrest 13 days later. Her IgE level was high (2,840 IU/ml) and the IgE-radioallergosorbent test (RAST) score was 2 for soybeans, 3 for buckwheat, 2 for rice, and 3 for wheat. An exaggerated hematemesis that occurred immediately after hospital admission indicated an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract that was caused by buckwheat. Marked ulceration accompanied with hemorrhage and necrosis was noted at the ileum. Extensive hemorrhage involving the endotracheal pulmonary field and lymphocyte infiltration of the alveolar space likely appeared after the inflammation. The analysis of buckwheat-specific IgE antibody by immunoblotting showed 7 bands that reacted with the IgE of the patient's serum, 4 bands: 16, 20, 24, and 58 kDa, were specific to the patient as compared to subjects not allergic to buckwheat. A first case of fatal FEA by buckwheat is reported with reference to specific IgE.
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7/42. Severe oral allergy syndrome and anaphylactic reactions caused by a Bet v 1- related PR-10 protein in soybean, SAM22.

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactic reactions to soy products have been attributed to stable class 1 food allergens. OBJECTIVE: IgE- mediated reactions to a soy-containing dietary food product in patients allergic to birch pollen were investigated. methods: Detailed case histories were taken from 20 patients. Their sera were analyzed for IgE (UniCAP) specific for birch, grass, mugwort, the recombinant birch allergens rBet v 1 and rBet v2, and soy protein. Extracts from birch pollen, soy isolate, rBet v 1, and the recombinant PR-10 soy protein rSAM22 were coupled to paper disks or nitrocellulose for IgE measurements (enzyme allergosorbent test) or Western blot analysis. Enzyme allergosorbent testing, Western blot inhibition, and histamine release studies were performed with the same allergens. RESULTS: Most patients (17/20) experienced facial, oropharyngeal, and/or systemic allergic symptoms within 20 minutes after ingesting the soy product for the first time. Birch pollen allergy (16/20) was common, along with oral allergy syndrome to apple (12/20) or hazelnut (11/20). IgE levels to birch and Bet v 1 but not to other inhalants were high in 18 of 20 patients. Significant IgE binding to rSAM22 occurred in 17 of 20 patients. Blot experiments with the soy isolate revealed IgE-binding bands at 17 kd (15/20), 22 kd (1/20), and 35 to 38 kd (2/20); the former was inhibited by preincubation of the sera with rBet v 1 or rSAM22. Birch extract and soy isolate, rBet v 1, and rSAM22 induced dose-dependent histamine release in the nanomolar range. CONCLUSION: Immediate-type allergic symptoms in patients with birch pollen allergy after ingestion of soy protein-containing food items can result from cross-reactivity of Bet v 1 -specific IgE to homologous pathogenesis-related proteins, particularly the PR-10 protein SAM22.
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8/42. food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis: first case report in thailand.

    A forty-year-old military personnel presented with generalized urticaria, syncope, shortness of breath and headache associated with jogging after ingestion of a taro-filled bun and a red bean-filled bun. skin prick test was positive for bread, taro and wheat but negative for red bean and preservative. exercise challenge tests were performed. exercise alone failed to induce any allergic reaction but exercise following ingestion of a taro-filled bun and a red bean-filled bun induced generalized urticaria. Since the patients stopped taking these types of food, the urticaria has not returned. This is the first case report of food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis in thailand.
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9/42. Oral allergy syndrome to fig.

    BACKGROUND: The few cases of food allergy to fig reported to date, whose main manifestations were anaphylactic reactions, have been related to a cross-sensitisation to weeping fig (ficus benjamina) or to the 'latex-fruit syndrome'. Here we report on two cases of the oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to fig in patients whose main allergic manifestations were related to sensitisation to grass and birch pollens. methods: The patients were characterised by clinical history, skin prick tests (SPT) with commercial and in-house extracts, prick-by-prick test, specific IgE measurements and challenge tests. PBS-soluble and insoluble extracts of both fig skin and pulp were examined for the presence of potential allergens by IgE immunoblotting. RESULTS: Both patients showed OAS followed by respiratory symptoms when challenged with fig. They were negative in both specific IgE detection and SPT with commercial extracts of fig and many other plant materials, including F. benjamina and hevea Brasiliensis, while grass and birch pollens gave positive results. Prick-by-prick tests and SPT with in-house extracts indicated that the fig skin had a much higher allergenicity than the pulp. Despite negative IgE detection by the CAP assay, immunoblotting experiments showed that potential fig allergens were PBS-soluble and present only in the skin of the fruit. CONCLUSIONS: OAS to fig followed by respiratory symptoms can be present in patients not sensitised to weeping fig or having the latex-fruit syndrome. Different parts of the fig can have different allergenicities, the most important allergens being proteins related to the skin of the fruit. Improved commercial fig extracts to be used for the diagnosis of this type of allergy have to be developed.
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ranking = 0.0091582499630528
keywords = plant
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10/42. Occupational dermatitis from Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Cichorium (endive). Simultaneous occurrence of immediate and delayed allergy as a cause of contact dermatitis.

    Four patients with occupational contact dermatitis to Lactuca sativa had cross-sensitivity to Cichorium endivia. One of the patients also had contact urticaria to Lactuca and Cichorium, and another reacted positively to scratch tests with these plants as a sign of immediate allergy. In two cases such immediate allergy was considered the cause of a vesicular, intense itching eruption within a few minutes of contact with fresh leaves of Lactuca on previously eczematous skin. The severe chronic dermatitis of the hands of these patients is ascribed to combined delayed and immediate allergy.
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