Cases reported "Food Hypersensitivity"

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1/10. The spectrum of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis beyond infancy: a clinical series of 30 children.

    OBJECTIVES: eosinophilic esophagitis, previously confused with esophageal inflammation due to gastroesophageal reflux, has recently begun to be distinguished from it. We undertook this analysis of our large series of children with the condition to clarify its spectrum: its presenting symptoms; its relation to allergy, respiratory disease, and reflux; its endoscopic and histological findings; and its diagnosis and therapy. methods: We analyzed the details of our clinical series of 30 children with eosinophilic esophagitis, defining it as > or =5 eosinophils per high power field in the distal esophageal epithelium. Retrospective chart review was supplemented by prospective, blinded, duplicate quantitative evaluation of histology specimens, and by telephone contact with some families to clarify subsequent course. Presentation and analysis of the series as a whole is preceded by a case illustrating a typical presentation with dysphagia and recurrent esophageal food impactions. RESULTS: Presenting symptoms encompass vomiting, pain, and dysphagia (some with impactions or strictures). Allergy, particularly food allergy, is an associated finding in most patients, and many have concomitant asthma or other chronic respiratory disease. A subtle granularity with furrows or rings is newly identified as the endoscopic herald of histological eosinophilic esophagitis. Histological characteristics include peripapillary or juxtaluminal eosinophil clustering in certain cases. association with eosinophilic gastroenteritis occurs, but is not common. Differentiation from gastroesophageal reflux disease is approached by analyzing eosinophil density and response to therapeutic trials. Therapy encompasses dietary elimination and anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. CONCLUSION: awareness of the spectrum of eosinophilic esophagitis should promote optimal diagnosis and treatment of this elusive entity, both in children and in adults.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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2/10. Multiple esophageal rings: an association with eosinophilic esophagitis: case report and review of the literature.

    Esophagitis may present endoscopically with erythema, edema, loss of vascular pattern, friability, and ulceration of the esophageal mucosa. Left untreated, chronic esophagitis may result in stricture formation. The presence of multiple concentric rings involving the entire esophagus has been cited as a chronic form of esophagitis. We present a case of an 8-yr-old boy with multiple concentric esophageal rings and histological evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis, who failed medical antireflux treatment and responded to an elimination diet.
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ranking = 0.87466948952039
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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3/10. Sandifer's syndrome in a breast-fed infant.

    Sandifer's syndrome is a rare manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children, occurring in association with abnormal movements of the head, neck, and upper part of the trunk. Out of 65 children with Sandifer's syndrome described in literature, only 2 were breast-fed. We report on a 15-day-old breast-fed girl affected by Sandifer's syndrome. Pathological GER was diagnosed with 24 h pH esophageal monitoring. In our patient, all the symptoms of Sandifer's syndrome disappeared when she was cow's milk formula-fed. The role of food allergy to dietary proteins ingested by a lactating mother is discussed.
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ranking = 0.00020339106437578
keywords = reflux
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4/10. Subglottic stenosis complicated by allergic esophagitis: case report.

    Allergic esophagitis is a known entity that had been described in patients with dysphagia. It has not been previously described in association with subglottic stenosis. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl with symptoms suggestive of allergic esophagitis who suffered from subglottic stenosis that recurred despite surgical measures. Her esophageal ph monitoring results were normal, and she did not respond to antireflux medications. She did respond dramatically to corticosteroid therapy with improvement of both her esophageal and laryngeal symptoms. Allergic esophagitis as a clinical entity is discussed.
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ranking = 0.87466948952039
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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5/10. Rice-induced enterocolitis in an infant: TH1/TH2 cellular hypersensitivity and absent IgE reactivity.

    BACKGROUND: Although food allergy is common in children, rice allergy is unusual in Western cultures. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of T-cell-mediated rice intolerance in an 11-month-old girl. methods: To evaluate the intolerance to rice in this patient, a graded rice food challenge was performed. To examine the immunologic reactivity to rice, in vitro lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine synthesis of rice-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) was performed. Subsequently, skin patch testing to rice and other foods was performed. RESULTS: Allergy skin prick test results were negative for rice and positive for egg, milk, and soy. Specific IgE antibodies to rice, egg, peanut, wheat, walnut, codfish, milk, soybean, corn, shrimp, scallops, and clams were undetectable. Results of a single-blind rice food challenge were positive, manifested by emesis that persisted for more than an hour and required intravenous hydration. in vitro lymphoproliferation by the patient's PBLs to rice stimulation was positive. In addition, cytokine synthesis of interferon-gamma, interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor a, and IL-5 by the patient's rice-stimulated PBLs was elevated, indicating a TH1/TH2 cell response to rice. endoscopy revealed normal esophageal, gastric, and duodenal mucosa; a biopsy specimen revealed mild esophagitis. Duodenal explant T cells were initially established by stimulation with rice and IL-2. After a 2-day rest, the lymphocytes were restimulated with rice for 7 days and revealed increased interferon-gamma and IL-5 synthesis. Twenty billion colony forming units of lactobacillus GG were added to the patient's diet twice daily. After 6 weeks, rice rechallenge resulted in emesis within 1 hour. Results of patch testing were positive to rice, wheat, and barley but negative to soy, which the patient tolerated on food challenge. CONCLUSIONS: Although this patient did not demonstrate IgE antibody to rice, TH1/TH2 cell-mediated responses to rice were detected, and the patient experienced significant morbidity. Patch testing for gastrointestinal food allergies may be useful when the food specific IgE antibody is negative. Probiotic therapy in this patient did not ameliorate her sensitivity to rice, and food elimination remains the only reliable treatment for TH1/TH2-mediated food hypersensitivity.
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ranking = 0.12492372835086
keywords = esophagitis
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6/10. eosinophilic esophagitis.

    BACKGROUND: Esophagitis is an increasingly diagnosed disease. patients with gastroesophagic reflux, dysphagia, vomiting or abdominal pain, with a torpid response to the treatment, could be suffering from it. MATERIAL AND methods: A 37 year-old male patient with background of gastroesophagic reflux and dysphagia for solids since 2002, self-limited diarrhea episodes and intolerance to alcoholic drinks due to epigastric pain. skin prick tests, specific IgE, histamine release test and basophil activation test were carried out. RESULTS: skin prick test to the usual allergens with negative result; prick-prick tests to egg white and yolk, milk and apple with positive result to egg white; total serum IgE within normal levels, specific IgE to egg white with positive result; histamine release test (HRT) and basophil activation test (BAT) with positive result to egg white and yolk. CONCLUSION: The patient was diagnosed eosinophilic esophagitis. The commercial food extracts have a great variability in their allergenic composition, which could result in false negative results in the prick test. Prick-prick with the natural food is a more sensitive technique than prick in the diagnosis of food allergy. There are other useful in vitro techniques, apart from specific IgE, in the diagnosis of food allergy. In our case, an exclusion diet of the involved food was more effective than other treatments for remission of the symptoms.
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ranking = 0.62502542388305
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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7/10. Cow's milk intolerance and abdominal surgery: a puzzling connection.

    We describe 9 infants (ranging from 1 to 6 1/2 months) in whom a surgical pathology (gastro-esophageal reflux and/or pyloric stenosis) was associated with cow's milk intolerance (CMI). In all cases vomiting and/or failure to thrive did not disappear after surgery. The patients recovered only after dietary manipulation by cow's milk protein free diet. In 5 out of 9 cases, multiple food intolerances were present (soy and/or casein hydrolysates). In all cases the diagnosis of CMI was confirmed by challenge test. The connections between CMI and abdominal surgery in infancy are discussed.
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ranking = 0.00020339106437578
keywords = reflux
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8/10. Radiographic abnormalities in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an unusual condition of unknown cause in which there is eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract usually accompanied by a peripheral eosinophilia. Rarely, it can also involve the esophagus. Recently, the authors have encountered 3 cases of eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. All patients had a strong history of allergies. Two of our patients have had upper esophageal strictures, as have 2 other previously reported cases. This appears to be the most common manifestation. One patient had polypoid lesions of the esophagus as well as of the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. Motility disturbances may also be present. Although steroid treatment may be beneficial, the esophageal strictures usually require mechanical dilatation to relieve submucosal fibrosis. This entity should be considered in any patient who has an esophageal disorder in the presence of either a strong history of allergy or peripheral eosinophilia.
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ranking = 0.49969491340344
keywords = esophagitis
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9/10. Respiratory diseases and food allergy.

    Both upper and lower respiratory tracts can be affected by food allergy. Manifestations in either may be exclusively due to food allergy (common in infants) or may result from the combined effects of food allergy plus another defect such as gastroesophageal reflux, a congenital defect of the heart or tracheo-bronchial tree, an immunodeficiency syndrome such as isolated IgA or IgG4 deficiency, or a concomitant inhalant allergy. Chronic rhinitis is the most common respiratory tract manifestation of food allergy. When it occurs in conjunction with lung disease, it may be a helpful indicator of activity of the allergic lung disease and of the patient's compliance in following a specific diet. Recurrent serous otitis media may be solely or partially due to food allergy. Large tonsillar and adenoid tissues, sometimes with upper airway obstruction, may be caused, or aggravated by, food allergies. Lower respiratory tract disease manifested by chronic coughing, wheezing, pulmonary infiltrates, or alveolar bleeding may also occur. Lower respiratory tract involvement is generally associated with a greater delay in onset of symptoms and with a larger quantity of allergen ingestion than chronic rhinitis. Food allergy should be considered when there is a history of prior intolerance to a food in childhood or of symptoms beginning soon after a particular food was introduced into the diet. It is an important consideration in patients who have chronic respiratory tract disease which does not respond adequately to the usual therapeutic measures and is otherwise unexplained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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ranking = 0.00020339106437578
keywords = reflux
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10/10. The potential role of gastroesophageal reflux in the pathogenesis of food-induced wheezing.

    Severe reactive airways disease (RAD) in children is frequently associated with gastroesophageal reflux or food allergy. However a relationship between these two confounding factors has yet to be investigated. We postulate that, in certain patients with micro-aspiration of gastric contents into the airways, food allergens sensitize T cells in the peribronchial lymphoid tissue and induce the production of food-specific IgE antibodies that sensitize airway cells. Subsequent exposure to these food allergens might then induce IgE dependent mediator release from mast cells as well as T cell and eosinophil activation, thus contributing to airway inflammation and RAD. In the current report, we describe the case of a patient with severe asthma who had food allergy and gastroesophageal reflux whose clinical findings support this hypothesis. We also provide additional evidence for a high rate of food sensitization in patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), RAD and GER. We conclude that additional studies are warranted to examine the possibility that patients who have RAD and GER require an evaluation for food allergy.
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ranking = 0.0012203463862547
keywords = reflux
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