Cases reported "Food Hypersensitivity"

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1/56. Eosinophilic gastritis due to anisakis: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: the parasite anisakis simplex is a helminth included in the nematode class. When man eats raw or rare fish and cephalopods infested by anisakis larvae, he can acquire the parasitic disease (anisakidosis). The parasite can also originate manifestations of immediate IgE mediated hypersensitivity in patients with sensitisation to it. methods AND RESULTS: we present the case of a 14 year old boy diagnosed of eosinophilic gastritis after endoscopic examination and biopsy associated to recurrent abdominal pain. After allergologic study, a type I hypersensitivity mechanism against anisakis simplex is confirmed by means of prick test, antigen specific IgE determination and antigen specific histamine release test. Sensitisation against fish proteins is ruled out as well as parasitic infestation. CONCLUSIONS: in this case report we demonstrate a type I hypersensitivity mechanism against anisakis simplex in a patient diagnosed of eosinophilic gastritis. This can be suspected in cases of gastritis or non filiated enteritis with a torpid evolution following the conventional treatment and especially if the onset of the symptoms is related with the intake of fish. The therapeutic success was reached when fish and shellfish were taken out of the diet. After two years without seafood ingestion our patient is asymptomatic and the allergologic study has been normalised.
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keywords = histamine
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2/56. Pistachio nut hypersensitivity: identification of pistachio nut allergens.

    Type I hypersensitivity to pistachio nut antigens was demonstrated in three patients by means of immediate skin-test reactivity, specific IgE determination by a fluoroimmunoassay (CAP), CAP-inhibition and leucocyte histamine release. Sensitization to other dried fruits and pollens was observed in the patients. The CAP-inhibition studies revealed significant crossreactivity between pistachio and cashew nut belonging to the anacardiaceae family, and between pistachio nut and other dried fruits belonging to taxonomically unrelated botanical families. No relevant crossallergenicity was observed between pistachio nut and lolium and olea pollens. sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of a pistachio nut extract followed by immunoblotting analysis identified four IgE-binding bands with molecular weights of 34, 41, 52 and 60 kD.
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keywords = histamine
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3/56. Peanut allergy.

    Peanut allergy is acute and severe with symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity. This allergy is very common, affecting 1% of preschoolers. The incidence has increased with succeeding generations, and is possibly due to the increasing exposure of children to peanuts at a young age. diagnosis is via history, skin prick test, and serum IgE level. The mainstay of therapy is avoidance. Treatment of anaphylaxis includes epinephrine and antihistamines. Children usually will not outgrow this food allergy. Novel treatment with rush immunotherapy and enzyme-potentiated desensitization is not currently acceptable. We describe a 27-month-old Asian boy with a typical presentation of peanut hypersensitivity. A good understanding of the epidemiology of this illness is necessary for treatment and prevention.
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keywords = histamine
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4/56. Lethal or life-threatening allergic reactions to food.

    Fatal or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions to food occur in infants, children and adults. Atopic individuals with bronchial asthma and prior allergic reactions to the same food are at a particularly high risk, whereby even the mere inhalation of the allergenic food can be fatal. Not only peanuts, seafood and milk can induce severe, potentially lethal anaphylaxis, but indeed a wide spectrum of foods, according to the different patterns of food sensitivity in different countries. Foods with "hidden" allergens and meals at restaurants are particularly dangerous for patients with food allergies. Similarly, schools, public places and restaurants are the major places of risk. However, the main factor contributing to a fatal outcome is the fact that the victims did not carry their emergency kit with adrenaline (epinephrine) with them. In cases of death where food anaphylaxis is suspected, it is important for forensic reasons to preserve uneaten portions of the food in order to identify (hidden) allergens. It is also important to determine postmortem specific serum IgE, tryptase and histamine levels to document the anaphylaxis. There is a need to raise awareness of the diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis among doctors, those called upon to administer emergency medical care, and the public, and also to provide increased support for those with potentially fatal food allergies through the help of patients' organizations, and national and international medical societies. The food industry should ensure a policy of comprehensive labelling of ingredients so that even the smallest amount of potentially lethal foodstuffs can be clearly identified. Finally, the pharmaceutical industry should be persuaded to reintroduce an adrenaline inhaler onto the market.
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ranking = 1
keywords = histamine
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5/56. Migraine in older patients: a case report and management strategies.

    Older patients can suffer from various forms of migraine. These patients should be educated regarding triggers and considered for prophylactic and acute treatments for frequent episodes. Practitioners should keep in mind the unique challenges of treating migraine in older persons and first search for other serious yet treatable causes for headache in these patients.
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ranking = 0.00029260424777379
keywords = headache
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6/56. A 4-year-old girl with manifestations of multiple chemical sensitivities.

    Multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) syndrome, also known as idiopathic environmental intolerance, is a controversial diagnosis that encompasses a wide range of waxing and waning, subjective symptoms referable to more than one body system and provoked by exposure to low levels of chemicals, foods, or other agents in the environment. Although MCS has been studied extensively, a unifying mechanism explaining the illness remains obscure, and clinicians are divided as to whether such a medical entity exists separately from psychosomatic syndromes. MCS is an adult diagnosis; there is little reference to pediatric cases in the scientific literature. In this case from the Pediatric environmental health Subspecialty Unit at boston's Children's Hospital, I present the case of a preschool child who had suffered from milk allergy and poor weight gain as an infant, and then later developed asthma, allergic symptoms, sinusitis, headaches, fatigue, and rashes precipitated by an expanding variety of chemicals, foods, and allergens. I review definitions, mechanisms, diagnostic strategies, and management, and discuss some uniquely pediatric features of MCS as illustrated by this case.
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ranking = 0.00029260424777379
keywords = headache
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7/56. Histamine--can it cause an acute coronary event?

    myocardial infarction (MI) occurring during the course of an allergic urticarial reaction in the absence of systemic hypotension has been rarely reported. This paper reports the case of a 28-year-old woman with no significant risk factors for coronary artery disease who presented with generalized urticaria associated with chest pain and had electrocardiographic and enzymatic evidence of an acute MI. review of the literature suggests that local histamine release may induce spasm of the coronary vasculature, thus leading to myocardial ischemia and infarction.
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ranking = 1
keywords = histamine
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8/56. The necessity for dual food intake to provoke food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FEIAn): a case report of FEIAn with simultaneous intake of wheat and umeboshi.

    BACKGROUND: Food-dependent exercised-induced anaphylaxis (FEIAn) is classified among the physical allergies. Many different food allergens have been reported, but the pathophysiology of FEIAn remains unknown. Furthermore, provocation tests with a suspected food do not always succeed in patients with FEIAn. OBJECTIVE: We sought to clarify and investigate causative foods and mechanisms of FEIAn in a 14-year-old boy. In addition, we tested in vivo and in vitro effects of cromolyn sodium in the same patient. methods: We used open challenge tests for the provocation of FEIAn and measured changes in plasma histamine levels and FEV1. In addition, we investigated the mechanism of FEIAn in this case with in vitro histamine release testing. RESULTS: The patient was diagnosed as having FEIAn by provocation testing with a simultaneous intake of wheat and umeboshi, but not when each food was eaten singly, followed by exercise. In addition, his plasma histamine level increased transiently and forced expiratory volume 1, expressed as a percentage change from baseline, decreased significantly. A synergistic effect on in vitro histamine release testing with 2 kinds of the causative foods was shown. Administration of cromolyn sodium proved to be effective on both the in vitro and in vivo tests. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of FEIAn provoked by the test with a simultaneous intake of 2 kinds of food. This case might in part explain negative challenge test results in patients with FEIAn.
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ranking = 4
keywords = histamine
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9/56. An outbreak of allergy-like food poisoning.

    Eight cases of allergy-like food poisoning resulting from the ingestion of yellowfin tuna, which had been kept in stock for 10 days prior to being cooked, are described. The main symptoms were headaches, facial flushing and palpitation. Samples of the ingested fish were analyzed for histamine content, and a high level of histamine was confirmed (310 mg/100 g of fish). Corticosteroids were given to 3 patients who exhibited dyspnea or persistent symptoms, while the remaining patients improved without medication. In situations where allergy-like clinical features are present after the ingestion of food, the possibility of allergy-like food poisoning should be recognized and included in a differential diagnosis.
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ranking = 2.0002926042478
keywords = histamine, headache
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10/56. Histamine fish poisoning: a common but frequently misdiagnosed condition.

    Scombrotoxic or histamine fish poisoning is a common condition normally associated with consuming spoiled tuna, mackerel, bonito, or skipjack. Typical symptoms like flushing, urticaria, and palpitations mimic those of allergy so histamine fish poisoning can easily be misdiagnosed. diagnosis is often clinical and the mainstay of treatment is antihistamines.
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ranking = 3
keywords = histamine
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