Cases reported "Food Hypersensitivity"

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1/12. Balsam-related systemic contact dermatitis.

    BACKGROUND: Positive patch tests to balsam of peru (BOP) or fragrance mix (FM) suggest the possibility of systemic contact dermatitis from balsam-related foods and spices. OBJECTIVE: This was a retrospective study to determine whether avoidance of balsam-related foods results in an improvement of dermatitis in these patients. methods: A review of the records of all patients seen from July 1 to Dec 31, 1998 with positive patch tests to BOP, FM, cinnamic aldehyde, and balsam of tolu was performed 9 to 14 months after their evaluation in a tertiary dermatology center. All patients were contacted via telephone to assess the status of their dermatitis and whether they were able to note any specific balsam-related food allergies. RESULTS: A total of 75 patients were identified, and 71 could be contacted. Fourteen were only allergic to BOP or FM on testing; 31 were positive to BOP/FM and other allergens with presumed relevance to BOP/FM; 26 were positive to BOP/FM and others with other allergens felt to be responsible for the dermatitis and were not placed on a BOP diet. Excluding this last group, 21 of 45 (47%) had complete or significant improvement that they related to dietary modification. Ten did not modify their diet, with 8 reporting no improvement. Eight improved with fragrance or other allergen avoidance only, and 6 modified their diet unsuccessfully. Most commonly implicated foods included tomatoes, citrus, and spices. CONCLUSION: Almost half of the subjects with positive patch tests to BOP or FM who followed a BOP reduction diet reported significant to complete improvement of their dermatitis.
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keywords = patch test, patch
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2/12. Contact dermatitis from antioxidants.

    In a search for contact sensitivity to antioxidants we patch tested consecutive patients referred with eczematous dermatitis. Six cases of allergic contact sensitivity to nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA) were observed. Three had been sensitized by one brand of cream containing 0.1% NDGA, in three patients the source of sensitization could not be traced. In four patients we found positive patch tests to butylated hydroxyanisole and/or to butylated hydroxytoluene. In two cases the positive patch tests were relevant, since both patients remained asymptomatic when antioxidants were avoided in food. They both had acute flares of vesicular eczema on the fingers after oral administration of small amounts. Gallate esters and vitamin e (d,l-alpha-tocopherol) each gave one unexplained positive patch test. The present data suggest that further search for hidden sensitizers in topical medicaments and cosmetics is warranted. A declaration of all ingredients in industrial products should be placed on the label.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = patch test, patch
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3/12. Oral leukoplakia caused by cinnamon food allergy.

    An oral leukoplakic lesion that was clinically thought to be a squamous cell carcinoma is presented. The cinnamon component of chewing gum was discovered to be the etiologic agent. The case is unusual because of the leukoplakia noted; all other previously reported cases described erythematous patches only. The role of food allergy in the pathophysiology of the lesion is discussed.
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keywords = patch
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4/12. Rice-induced enterocolitis in an infant: TH1/TH2 cellular hypersensitivity and absent IgE reactivity.

    BACKGROUND: Although food allergy is common in children, rice allergy is unusual in Western cultures. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of T-cell-mediated rice intolerance in an 11-month-old girl. methods: To evaluate the intolerance to rice in this patient, a graded rice food challenge was performed. To examine the immunologic reactivity to rice, in vitro lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine synthesis of rice-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) was performed. Subsequently, skin patch testing to rice and other foods was performed. RESULTS: Allergy skin prick test results were negative for rice and positive for egg, milk, and soy. Specific IgE antibodies to rice, egg, peanut, wheat, walnut, codfish, milk, soybean, corn, shrimp, scallops, and clams were undetectable. Results of a single-blind rice food challenge were positive, manifested by emesis that persisted for more than an hour and required intravenous hydration. in vitro lymphoproliferation by the patient's PBLs to rice stimulation was positive. In addition, cytokine synthesis of interferon-gamma, interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor a, and IL-5 by the patient's rice-stimulated PBLs was elevated, indicating a TH1/TH2 cell response to rice. endoscopy revealed normal esophageal, gastric, and duodenal mucosa; a biopsy specimen revealed mild esophagitis. Duodenal explant T cells were initially established by stimulation with rice and IL-2. After a 2-day rest, the lymphocytes were restimulated with rice for 7 days and revealed increased interferon-gamma and IL-5 synthesis. Twenty billion colony forming units of lactobacillus GG were added to the patient's diet twice daily. After 6 weeks, rice rechallenge resulted in emesis within 1 hour. Results of patch testing were positive to rice, wheat, and barley but negative to soy, which the patient tolerated on food challenge. CONCLUSIONS: Although this patient did not demonstrate IgE antibody to rice, TH1/TH2 cell-mediated responses to rice were detected, and the patient experienced significant morbidity. Patch testing for gastrointestinal food allergies may be useful when the food specific IgE antibody is negative. Probiotic therapy in this patient did not ameliorate her sensitivity to rice, and food elimination remains the only reliable treatment for TH1/TH2-mediated food hypersensitivity.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = patch test, patch
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5/12. risk of allergy to food proteins in topical medicinal agents and cosmetics.

    The risk of allergy to food proteins in cosmetics and topical medicinal agents is poorly evaluated. IgE dependent contact urticaria and contact dermatitis are observed. Eleven cases (7 infants and 4 women) are reported. Wheat, egg, oats, milk, peanut proteins are incriminated by prick-tests or atopy patch-tests. Cases are related to a previous food allergy and other ones may indicate primary sensitization to topical creams mainly used for skin care of atopic dermatitis. A consecutive exercise induced anaphylaxis to wheat and a long lasting sensitization to wheat have been observed. A clear and accurate identification of food allergens in cosmetics and topical agents is necessary. Given the hyper-permeability of infant skin, topical products containing food proteins of known allergenicity are contra-indicated for neonates, and for infants with atopic dermatitis, which may be associated with skin hyper-permeability.
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ranking = 0.0027144799665145
keywords = patch
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6/12. Peanut sensitivity as a cause of burning mouth.

    A patient with a history of a burning tongue together with discomfort of the labial and buccal mucosae was given an elimination diet and skin patch tests to determine the allergen in her diet. The patient was identified as being intolerant of an aqueous peanut extract. Three allergens in peanut butter were identified, the one with greatest reactivity being a heat-stable, water-soluble, nonglycosylated protein with a molecular weight in excess of 10 kD. Modification of her diet has resulted in resolution of the oral problem.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = patch test, patch
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7/12. Urticarial contact dermatitis in food handlers.

    OBJECTIVE: To show that prick testing (using fresh samples of the food suspected from the patient's history) and not only patch testing is the appropriate investigation in selected cases of hand dermatitis in patients who spend considerable time handling foods (for example, catering workers, cooks). SETTING: The Contact and Occupational dermatitis Clinic at the Skin and Cancer Foundation, a tertiary referral centre in Sydney. patients: Fourteen patients with hand dermatitis present for an average of 6.17 years referred by dermatologists and occupational health physicians. INTERVENTIONS: Patch and prick tests were performed for each patient. RESULT: In all patients prick tests identified the food allergens. seafood was the most common allergen giving positive results in 10 patients. patch tests did not identify any of the food allergens. Of the 14 patients nine were followed up and seven of these had been forced to change their career direction. CONCLUSION: Prick testing is the appropriate investigation in selected cases for the diagnosis of urticarial contact dermatitis in food handlers.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = patch test, patch
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8/12. Allergy and toxicodermia from shiitake mushrooms.

    Skin and respiratory symptoms developed within 2 months of exposure in a patient involved in the commercial production of shiitake mushrooms. A diagnosis of contact urticaria and allergic contact dermatitis from shiitake mushrooms was confirmed by prick and patch tests. The respiratory symptoms, their timing, the presence of precipitating IgG antibodies to shiitake spores and increased amounts of inflammatory cells and T lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage indicated allergic alveolitis (mushroom worker's disease). A generalized exanthem developed in a second patient after eating raw shiitake mushrooms. Reactions to prick and patch tests with shiitake mushrooms were negative. The skin eruption in this patient corresponded to the previously reported shiitake-induced toxicodermia.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = patch test, patch
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9/12. Sensitivity reaction to the cinnamonaldehyde component of toothpaste.

    Sixteen patients developed a variety of oral lesions following a change in the toothpaste they used. Mucosal biopsy demonstrated features consistent with application of a topical medicament and patch testing, towards the constituents of the toothpastes, indicated the flavouring agent cinnamonaldehyde as being the likely responsible agent. Avoidance of the implicated toothpastes resulted in a considerable improvement in clinical signs and symptoms, whereas rechallenge in ten patients resulted in recurrence of symptoms in eight patients. It is concluded that sensitivity to the cinnamonaldehyde constituent of certain toothpastes, although uncommon, should be considered as a possible aetiological factor in patients presenting with non-specific oral changes.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = patch test, patch
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10/12. Two types of contact urticaria and immediate reactions to patch-test allergens.

    3 patients with contact urticaria as the only pathological symptom are described, 2 with contact urticaria and other manifestations of hypersensitivity and 3 with immediate reaction to patch-test allergens.
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ranking = 0.013572399832572
keywords = patch
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