Cases reported "Foot Dermatoses"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/33. Rowell's syndrome.

    Rowell's syndrome is the name given to a distinct group of patients with lupus erythematosus who develop erythema multiforme-like lesions and have a characteristic serological picture. We report a case of a 29-year-old woman of Afro-Caribbean origin who presented with an erythema multiforme-like eruption on the hands. Subsequently she developed painful erythematous swellings on the feet and scaly plaques on the forearm and thigh consistent with subacute cutaneous lupus. She developed a positive antinuclear factor and had positive anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies and a positive rheumatoid factor. All of these features are consistent with Rowell's syndrome which we believe is a rare but distinct variant of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/33. acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with oral terbinafine.

    A case history of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) following oral terbinafine is reported. A 64-year-old woman presented with a rapidly spreading micropustular eruption 3 days after completing a 28-day course of oral terbinafine. There was a positive family history of psoriasis but no personal history. The clinical presentation and histopathology were consistent with AGEP. There was nearly complete resolution of the pustular eruption within 3.5 weeks following cessation of oral terbinafine and treatment with topical and systemic corticosteroids. The patient has remained free of any recurrence 18 months later. A summary of drugs known to be associated with AGEP is presented. Prompt recognition of AGEP is stressed in order to avoid confusion with acute generalized pustular psoriasis or a systemic infection. The most important aspect of management is the immediate withdrawal of the suspect drug.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/33. A puzzling rash. Is a skin biopsy a useful diagnostic tool?

    The diagnosis of a puzzling skin rash may require the clinician to provide a well taken biopsy specimen with an accompanying detailed description of the rash. The pathologist needs to be cognizant of the clinical manifestation of skin eruptions and to correlate the histopathological findings with the clinical features.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/33. Cutaneous larva migrans with parts of the larva in the epidermis.

    Creeping eruption is usually caused by hookworms, most commonly ancylostoma braziliensis and ancylostoma caninum. Because lesions of cutaneous larva migrans have a typical clinical appearance, they are rarely biopsied. Specimens usually show spongiotic dermatitis with spongiotic vesicles containing neutrophils and eosinophils and a mixed-cell dermal infiltrate with numerous eosinophils. We report a case with parts of the larva migrans in the epidermis on histologic examination.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/33. Papular-purpuric gloves-and-socks syndrome with bloody bullae.

    Papular-purpuric gloves-and-socks syndrome (PPGSS) is a disease characterized by itchy, painful acral erythema with edema, confluent papules, and purpura in a gloves-and-socks distribution and is associated with fever and mucosal lesions. parvovirus B19 and other viral infections have been proven to be causative agents of this syndrome. Its histological findings have been the non-specific ones of interface dermatitis. Here, we report a case of PPGSS in a 44-year-old man that we believe to be the first such case in japan. He developed, within one day, a painful edematous eruption with confluent papules and purpura on his hands and feet accompanied by high fever. A unique clinical manifestation in this case was multiple bloody bullae on the toes, which have not been previously described. Serological tests were negative for parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, and measles virus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/33. Recurrent palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia following high-dose cytarabine treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia (PPE) is an uncommon cutaneous complication of cytotoxic chemotherapy which generally presents as a painful erythema involving the palms and soles. It has been suggested that PPE caused by cytarabine does not recur with subsequent cytarabine re-challenge. We report a patient with recurrent, increasingly severe episodes of PPE, ultimately complicated by a severe bullous eruption, following successive cycles of high-dose cytarabine for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Contrary to previous recommendations, our experience cautions against the further use of high-dose cytarabine in patients who develop PPE, and is a timely reminder of the potential toxicity of this agent, which is now increasingly being used as first-line treatment in the management of haematologic malignancies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/33. Atypical varicella with palm and sole involvement.

    Varicella is a common disease characterized by a typical presentation. We report a case of an atypical presentation of varicella with a centrifugal distribution, eruption with many vesicles, no pustular stage in evolution and distal involvement. There were none of the known modifying factors (immunosuppression, skin disease, injury or sun exposure). To explain the distal involvement we suggest intraepidermic lesions caused by a pre-existing B1 coxsackie infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/33. Arcuate plantar plaques as the initial sign of chronic cutaneous lupus in a child.

    A 9-year-old girl was initially seen with bilateral mildly pruritic plantar skin lesions. skin biopsy demonstrated a superficial and deep perivascular lymphoid infiltrate with mucin but was not specific. Laboratory evaluation revealed a mildly elevated antinuclear antibody and mild leukopenia. Over the following year, an annular skin lesion developed in the preauricular area, her antinuclear antibody titer rose, and she was found to have positive anti-SS-B antibodies. She responded to oral hydrochloroquine with resolution of her skin lesions. This report highlights the unusual presentation of a case of chronic cutaneous lupus with a plantar skin eruption.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/33. Annular pompholyx.

    The common manifestation of pompholyx is easily recognized by the clinician. Morphologic variants are known in which the predominant lesions are pustules or desquamation with or without erythema. A patient is described herein whose eruption was composed mainly of arciform, annular, and target-like vesicles. Pompholyx (bubble) is a preferred term because "dyshidrosis" denotes a dysfunction of sweating, which does not occur in this condition. The causes of this eruption have not been determined, but it is likely that a certain genetic predisposition and multiple environmental factors are responsible. Pompholyx should be considered in the differential diagnosis of eruptions with annular pattern.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/33. A case of mixed bullous disease of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and linear iga bullous dermatosis.

    A 75-year-old Japanese male visited us with bullous eruptions on the extremities. physical examination revealed large bullae on the hands, lower legs and feet. The oral mucosa was also involved. histology disclosed subepidermal blister with inflammatory cell infiltrates in the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence showed deposits of IgG and IgA at the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence on 1 M NaCl-split human skin sections demonstrated that the patient's IgG antibodies reacted with the dermal side of the split, while IgA antibodies reacted with the epidermal side. immunoblotting showed that the patient's serum reacted with the NC1 domain of type VII collagen (290-kDa epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen) as well as the 120-kDa linear iga bullous dermatosis antigen, LAD-1. Systemic prednisolone resulted in a favorable response. From the clinicopathological findings, the present case is not consistent with either epidermolysis bullosa acquisita or IgA bullous dermatosis. Therefore, we regarded the case as mixed bullous disease of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and linear iga bullous dermatosis. Such a case has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Foot Dermatoses'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.