Cases reported "Foot Diseases"

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1/165. Bone cyst of a fishy origin: from an old catfish spine puncture wound to the foot.

    A rare first metatarsal unicameral-type bone cyst with a deceptive radiographic appearance and size and an unusual pathological etiology was identified in a female patient. This eccentric cyst was observed only postoperatively by radiograph. review of the patient's history documented a foot injury from a catfish spine as the etiology of this chronically inflamed cyst.
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2/165. osteomyelitis associated with peripheral vascular disease secondary to diabetes mellitus.

    diabetes mellitus and arteriosclerotic vascular disease have been found to be the predisposing factors of osteomyelitis associated with peripheral vascular disease (10). A diabetic person is more susceptible to osteomyelitis because of the microangiopathy, peripheral neuropathy and decreased resistance to infection. In diabetes mellitus there can be microangiopathy which results from the proliferation of the endothelium of the intima and thickening of the basement membrane. This further contributes to a sluggish blood flow. In the patient with arteriosclerotic vascular disease, the lumens of the arterioles and arterioles are compromised by the atheromatous plaques. The anatomic structure of the blood supply to bone along with the pathologic membrane thickening, allows for slowing of blood. This slowing of blood flow causes micro-thrombi and enhances bacterial growth. In diabetes mellitus it has been shown that there is a decreased immunologic response which, along with the above, contributes to the sheltering and proliferation of bacteria in the small bones of the foot.
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3/165. Enchondroma as a cause of midfoot pain.

    Enchondroma is a common bone tumor of the foot. It is often reported in the phalanges and distal metatarsals. The authors, however, present a rare case study of two patients with enchodromas as the cause of midfoot pain. One case presented in the lateral cuneiform which to the authors' knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Two cases are presented with their surgical management including autogenous calcaneal graft and follow-up.
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4/165. mycosis fungoides masquerading as an ischemic foot.

    This case is of a man with bilateral lower-extremity ischemia and a solitary nonhealing ulcerated lesion of the right great toe. After revascularization with an aortobifemoral bypass, his right ABI increased from 0.5 to approximately 0.75, but the ulcerated toe lesion did not show signs of healing and instead progressed to a deeper ulceration exposing bone. Because of presumptive osteomyelitis, we performed a great toe amputation, and immunohistochemical analysis of the lesion revealed late plaque stage mycosis fungoides (MF). We present this case to alert the vascular surgeon to this diagnostic possibility when confronted with an apparent ischemic lesion and to describe what made this particular lesion suspicious for MF. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of MF presenting solely as an ischemic lesion.
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keywords = bone
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5/165. Primary lymphoma of the calcaneus with recurrence in the distal tibia: a case report.

    Primary lymphoma of bone in general is a very rare condition which represents approximately 3% of all primary malignant bone tumors. Of these, less than 1% originate in the foot. The following case presentation demonstrates a patient who presented with primary lymphoma of the calcaneus, diagnosed by open bone biopsy and treated with radiation therapy. The patient remained disease free for almost 3 years, at which time recurrence to the contralateral distal tibia was diagnosed again through open biopsy.
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keywords = bone
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6/165. Presumed periorbital lupus vulgaris with ocular extension.

    OBJECTIVE: To report an unusual case of lupus vulgaris that spread to the left anterior ocular surface. DESIGN: Case report. PARTICIPANT: An 18-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of an infiltrative skin lesion affecting the left lower eyelid and cheek area, left globe, right lacrimal sac area, together with a cystic lesion in the foot area. TESTING/INTERVENTION: The authors describe the clinical findings, radiologic study, and histopathologic study of the conjunctiva, skin, liver, and ankle lesion. The patient was treated with antituberculous medications for 3 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Healing of the skin, conjunctival, and bone lesions. RESULTS: The lesion of the face healed, leaving scar tissue. The left eye showed symblepharon with loss of its anterior surface features. The right eye showed no symblepharon, the bones of the foot healed with no deformity, and the liver function test results normalized after 3 months of antituberculous medications. CONCLUSION: lupus vulgaris can be associated with multiple system involvement. Its clinical presentation and behavior depend on the patient's immunity and duration of the disease. early diagnosis and appropriate management may cure the disease with no life-threatening sequelae.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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7/165. Extraskeletal osteochondroma of the foot.

    A case of pathologically proven extraskeletal osteochondroma is presented with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), bone scan and radiographic findings. The diagnosis of extraskeletal osteochondroma should be considered when a discrete, ossified mass is localized in the soft tissues of the distal extremities. Nomenclature surrounding this entity is controversial and is discussed.
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8/165. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the fourth metatarsal.

    Chondromyxoid fibroma is a rare benign tumor that is typically found in the metaphyseal ends of long tubular bones, such as the tibia. The authors describe a case of this neoplasm occurring in the foot. Treatment included complete resection with reconstruction using an autogenous fibular bone graft. The surgical technique and the advantages of using a fibular bone graft are discussed.
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keywords = bone
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9/165. Giant cell tumour of talar body.

    Giant cell tumour (osteoclastoma) of talar bone is a rare entity and is seen more commonly in the third decade of life. We report this disease entity in a 17-years-old girl. The patient presented with painful swelling of the left ankle with an osteolytic lesion in the talus on conventional radiographs. Intralesional curettage and autologous bone grafting was performed following which patient's pain and swelling disappeared. Complete range of movement at the ankle joint was regained with minimal restriction at the subtalar joint. There is no evidence of relapse at six months follow up.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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10/165. Management of foot pain associated with accessory bones of the foot: two clinical case reports.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case study. OBJECTIVES: To discuss the differential diagnosis, the nonsurgical and postoperative management of common accessory bones of the foot. BACKGROUND: Accessory bones of the foot that are formed during abnormal ossification are commonly found in asymptomatic feet. Two of the most common accessory bones are the accessory navicular and the os peroneum. Their painful presence must be considered in the differential diagnosis of any acute or chronic foot pain. The optimal treatment for the conservative and postoperative management of painful os peroneum and accessory navicular bones remains undefined. methods AND MEASURES: Therapeutic management of the fractured os peroneum included bracing, taping, and foot orthotics to allow healing of involved tissues, and stretching. The focus of the postoperative management of the accessory navicular was joint mobilization and progressive strengthening. Dependent variables included level of pain with provocation and alleviation tests of joint and soft tissue; girth and sensory tests of the foot and ankle; goniometric measures of foot and ankle; strength of ankle and hip muscles; functional tests; and patient's self-reported pain status. RESULTS: The patient with the fractured os peroneum was treated in 13 visits for 10 weeks. At discharge from physical therapy, the patient had the following outcomes relative to the noninvolved side: 100% return of normal sensation tested by light touch and vibration; pain decreased from 6/10 to 1/10; 100% reduction of swelling with ankle girth to normal; 100% range of motion of ankle and subtalar joints. Strength in plantar flexion and eversion remained 20% impaired (80% return to normal) secondary to pain. Upon discharge, he still reported mild pain when walking but was able to return to previous leisure activities. The second patient with the accessory navicular was treated in 18 visits over 9 weeks. Relative to the uninvolved side, she was discharged with the following: 70% return of range of motion in the foot and ankle, 100% of strength in hip and ankle, and 100% return of balance. She could squat and jump without pain and she returned to full premorbid activity level. CONCLUSIONS: Rehabilitative management of both cases addressed specific impairments and was successful in improving the patients' activity limitation. Clinicians should be aware that these accessory bones are possible sources of disability, secondary to foot pain.
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ranking = 9
keywords = bone
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