Cases reported "Foot Diseases"

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1/25. Elastofibroma of the foot: uncommon presentation: a case report and review of the literature.

    We report the clinical, microscopic and ultrastructural features of an elastofibroma arising in the foot. The lesion typically occurs in the elderly, and in 85% of cases arises from the connective tissue of the posterior chest wall. The histopathologic features of this lesion are distinctive, and are characterized by a haphazard array of eosinophilic collagen and elastic fibers, associated with fibroblasts and aggregates of mature fat cells. There are only two reported cases in the literature arising in the foot.
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2/25. Restoration of bones in mycetoma.

    In a case of actinomycotic mycetoma caused by streptomyces madurae with extensive destruction of the bone, the foot was saved from amputation by appropriate antibiotic therapy given for a period of 2 1/2 years. Periodic x-ray examinations gave a valuable guide to the progress of the patient. Chemotherapy and antibiotics play an important role in the present day management of mycetoma. Cutaneous amelioration is not the criteria for cure. The bone restoration that occurs much later should be the guide for the duration of therapy.
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ranking = 1.0030957002196
keywords = ray, x-ray
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3/25. Giant cell tumor of the intermediate cuneiform. A case report.

    Although it has yet to be determined which surgical procedure provides the least chance for recurrence, surgical treatment remains the preferred therapy for giant cell tumors of bone. Few cases of giant cell tumor of the tarsus have been reported in the literature, with less than 10 of these cases occurring in the cuneiforms. When the extent of the tumor is questionable, definitive radiologic techniques should be used to aid in the selection of the most appropriate surgical procedure. Follow-up radiographic examination is critical to ensure that the patient remains tumor free. Yearly chest x-rays are recommended to rule out pulmonary metastasis. Although giant cell tumors represent only 5% to 8% of all benign primary osseous neoplasms of the foot, they have the potential to undergo malignant transformation, increasing the morbidity and mortality to the patient. giant cell tumors of bone are locally aggressive, often occurring adjacent to articular surfaces, and usually are large when diagnosed. It is essential for the surgeon to plan a treatment that not only minimizes the chance of recurrence, but also attempts to preserve function of the involved part.
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keywords = ray, x-ray
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4/25. Primary palmoplantar Kaposi's sarcoma: an unusual presentation.

    A 65-year-old diabetic Saudi Arabian man taking glibenclamide for 9 years presented with painful reddish patches and plaques involving the palms and soles of 6 months' duration. These lesions started as small faint purple-red macules and gradually increased in number and size. The patient did not seek any medical advice other than for these painful lesions. His medical history was insignificant. On examination, the patient had multiple, discrete, dull red-to-violaceous and tender patches and plaques of variable sizes on both palms and soles (Figure 1 and Figure 2). His mucous membranes, scalp, and nails were normal. A systemic clinical examination was unremarkable other than an amputation of the distal phalanx of the left index. Result of routine laboratory investigations including complete blood cell count, liver and renal function tests, and chest x-ray were normal. An hiv test was negative. A punch skin biopsy taken from the left palm showed acanthosis and spongiosis in the epidermis. The dermis showed a large number of dilated, medium-sized capillaries with scanty extravasated red blood cells, marked infiltration of lymphocytes and histiocytes, and a few plasma cells (Figure 3 and Figure 4). immunohistochemistry results were positive for CD34 and CD68. polymerase chain reaction for human herpesvirus 8 was also positive. The treatment options, including cryotherapy and intralesional chemotherapy, were discussed with the patient but, unfortunately, he did not return for follow-up.
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keywords = ray, x-ray
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5/25. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the foot.

    The author describes a malignant tumor presenting in the hallux of a middle-aged Caucasian male. Clinical and histologic characteristics are portrayed. Comparison with similar tumors, as well as differentiation among the five subtypes, is reported.
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6/25. The use of a hand-held gamma detector improves the safety of isolated limb perfusion.

    We used two hand-held gamma-detecting probes (GDP) (Neoprobe 1000 system) capable of detecting small gamma emissions to monitor leakage in patients undergoing hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) who received 800 microCi technetium 99m pentetate through the perfusate. The percentage of gamma-ray leakage was calculated by a simultaneous reading of two probes at 1-minute intervals (one over the precordial area and one over the thigh) and this was compared to results of simultaneous blood sampling from the perfusate and systemic circulation at 15-minute intervals for gamma well counting (GWC). The percentage of leakage recorded by the GDPs was essentially identical to that detected by the GWC (7.3% and 8.2%, respectively at the conclusion of the perfusion). The GDP gives an immediate and accurate indication of the percentage of leakage during HILP, making it a safer procedure.
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7/25. Cavernous hemangioma of the foot. Case report and literature review.

    Theories about the nature of cavernous hemangiomas have been reviewed. Most authors believe that such vascular tumors are congenital. The influence of pregnancy on the growth of these tumors was exemplified in a case report, and explanatory mechanisms were offered. Occurrences of cavernous hemangiomas that involve the foot were reported in the literature, ranging from 4.9% to 28.5% of all cases reviewed. X-ray findings of phleboliths and the importance of angiography in planning treatment were emphasized. In the authors' case report, a satisfactory surgical result was obtained in a plantar foot lesion that would otherwise have required amputation.
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8/25. Surgical management of the deep plantar abscess in the diabetic patient.

    The authors report the case of a deep plantar abscess in a diabetic patient. The pathophysiology of diabetic foot lesions as well as classification is discussed. The philosophy of local radical debridement involving ray resection, as well as postdebridement management is discussed in detail.
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9/25. Acrometastases. A study of twenty-nine patients with osseous involvement of the hands and feet.

    We studied the records of twenty-nine patients with forty-one metastatic lesions of the hand or foot. In five patients the lesions mimicked a benign condition, and inappropriate treatment was given. In eleven patients the acrometastases were the first indication of malignant disease, and four other patients had no known primary malignant lesion. amputation of a phalanx, digit, or ray is recommended for most solitary phalangeal, metacarpal, or metatarsal lesions when the expected period of survival of the patient exceeds a few months.
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10/25. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with cerebral and cerebellar metastases and subarachnoidal bleeding: a case report.

    A 19-year-old male was hospitalized with a swelling tumor in his left foot. Bone marrow analysis showed marrow carcinosis. Blood investigations, x-rays, radioisotopic scanning and computer tomography did not show any signs of a tumor. The patient died 6 months after the first admission to hospital. autopsy showed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) in planta pedis. Besides metastasis in the columna and thoracal lymph nodes, there was tumor tissue in the arachnoidea and subarachnoidal bleeding, a combination not earlier described. ARMS is highly malignant and most of the patients are young.
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ranking = 1.0030957002196
keywords = ray, x-ray
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