Cases reported "Foot Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/27. replantation of an avulsive amputation of a foot after recovering the foot from the sea.

    A foot avulsion case, with the dismembered body part submerged in sea water for 1 hour, is presented. This report is unique in that it is the first to document the reattachment of a body part that had been submerged in sea water. It was not known how salt-water exposure would affect wound management. Differences in osmolarity and bacterial flora between the sea water and foot tissues have not caused any problems, and the patient has not suffered any vascular or infectious complications after replantation. Neurotization of the plantar surface by the tibial nerve, which was stripped off during amputation and replaced in its original traces, was the most critical part of convalescence. After management of such an interesting case, we conclude that exposure to sea water of the dismembered part should not be a contraindication for replantation surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/27. "Floating tibia-talus complex"--an ipsilateral dislocation of the knee and the subtalar joint in an elderly patient: a case report and review of the literature.

    knee dislocation is defined as a radiographically confirmed total loss of the tibiofemoral articulation. This rare injury is believed to be the result of a high-impact trauma. Knee dislocations are classified according the direction of tibial displacement with respect to the femur. Subtalar dislocation is the simultaneous dislocation of the distal articulations of the talus at both the talocalcaneal and talonavicular joints. These injuries are also quite rare and are mostly (80%-85%) classified as medial subtalar dislocations with the calcaneus lying medially, the head of the talus being prominent dorsolaterally and the navicular located medial and dorsal to the talar head. The authors report the case of an elderly patient who suffered ipsilateral anterior dislocation of his left knee and medial subtalar dislocation of his left foot. The authors believe this to be the first presentation in the English literature of an ipsilateral combination of these two injuries on the same limb.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/27. Free medial plantar perforator flaps for the resurfacing of finger and foot defects.

    In this article, three cases in which free medial plantar perforator flaps were successfully transferred for coverage of soft-tissue defects in the fingers and foot are described. This perforator flap has no fascial component and is nourished only by perforators of the medial plantar vessel and a cutaneous vein or with a small segment of the medial plantar vessel. The advantages of this flap are minimal donor-site morbidity, minimal damage to both the posterior tibial and medial plantar systems, no need for deep dissection, the ability to thin the flap by primary removal of excess fatty tissue, the use of a large cutaneous vein as a venous drainage system, a good color and texture match for finger pulp repair, short time for flap elevation, possible application as a flow-through flap, and a concealed donor scar.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/27. Sensate sole-to-sole reconstruction using the combined medial plantar and medialis pedis free flap.

    The coverage of soft-tissue defects of the sole needs special consideration because of the forces of weight bearing on the reconstruction. A variety of free tissue transfers have been advocated for soft-tissue replacement of the weight-bearing portions. However, there is no doubt that the ideal tissue for resurfacing the sole is the plantar tissue itself. The authors present a case of reconstructing the sole with the combined medial plantar and medialis pedis free flap that involves approximately 70% of the weight-bearing portion. This contralateral, combined fasciocutaneous free flap based on the posterior tibial-medial plantar vascular system is a good alternative in covering extensive sole injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/27. The "floating ankle": a pattern of violent injury. Treatment with thin-pin external fixation.

    The "floating ankle" is an underappreciated pattern of injury that results from violent trauma and/or blast injuries in military personnel. It is characterized by an intact ankle mortise with a distal tibia fracture and an ipsilateral foot fracture, creating instability around the ankle. This pattern of injury may be the result of the military boot, which both protects the foot from immediate amputation or further injury and renders the distal tibia susceptible to fracture at the boot top. Four patients with open floating ankle injuries were treated with thin-pin circular fixation with good results. Two patients required bone transport for segmental loss. All patients are ambulatory without assistance or bracing. Thin-pin external fixation is a reasonable approach to this complex injury pattern, especially in the presence of marked soft tissue compromise with or without segmental bone loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/27. Versatility of the distally based superficial sural flap for reconstruction of lower leg and foot in children.

    Twenty children are presented after undergoing a distally based superficial sural flap for coverage of defects at the lower leg and foot. The age of the patients was between 1 and 12 years. Fifteen patients had trauma to the lower leg, with eight of them having associated injuries. Three had postburn contracture and two had pressure sore. In 14 cases, the flap was used as a fasciocutaneous flap, whereas in six cases it was used as a fascial flap covered with a skin graft. The flaps were used to cover the defects from the dorsum of the foot distally up to the mid third of tibia proximally. The mean follow-up was for a period of 2 years. Even though free tissue transfer is reliable and safe for the reconstruction of major leg injuries in children, the distally based superficial sural flap has the advantage of being easy to perform, with short operating time, minimal donor side morbidity, and preservation of major arteries of the leg.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/27. Land mine injury: functional testing outcome.

    We present a case of a war patient treated with external fixation for a complex land mine injury involving the fracture of the tibial and fibular bones, which occurred at the front line during the war in croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Excessive destruction and foreign body penetration into the distal two-thirds of the right leg and foot endangered not only the patient's lower extremity but his life as well. Nevertheless, the patient's life, as well as extremity, was saved due to an intensive treatment. A 100-month follow-up showed a bridge callus between the tibia and fibula, tibial bone defects, tibial anterior angulation of 5 degrees, and arthrosis of the right upper ankle joint. Despite a relatively unsatisfactory X-ray finding, the functional testing on the dynamometry system Cybex 300 showed surprisingly good results. There was a satisfactory functional recovery of the treated extremity: the patient could walk without any help even on rocky grounds and was actively involved in his sheep farm duties.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/27. Combined rupture of the tibialis anterior and the extensor hallucis longus tendons--functional reconstruction.

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic rupture of the tibialis anterior (TA) tendon represents a very rare foot injury. A combined injury of both the TA and the extensor hallucis longus (EHL) tendons has not yet been reported. Within the scope of this work we will prove that tendon transfers in cases of combined tendon injuries are a reasonable course of action in order to achieve the aim of a functional reconstruction. methods: A combined rupture of the tibialis anterior (TA) and the extensor hallucis longus (EHL) tendons was treated by suturing the EHL tendon to the distal TA tendon stump. The TA insertion was secured and the distal portion of the EHL tendon attached to an extensor digitorum slip. The TA muscle was proximally attached to the tendinous EHL segment. RESULTS: A 1 year follow-up verified very good results, showing the patient without complaints in regard to the trauma. Compared with the contralateral non-affected side, the repaired foot showed very satisfactory results in reference to range of motion, strength and gait. CONCLUSION: With this work we proved that tendon transfers in cases of combined tendon injuries make sense in order to achieve functional reconstruction. This approach preserves function and strength and avoids the problems and risks of alternate treatment techniques, including tendon grafting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/27. Distally based perforator medial plantar flap: a new flap for reconstruction of plantar forefoot defects.

    In this article the author describes 2 cases of a distally based perforator medial plantar flap that were transferred successfully from the nonweight-bearing instep region to the weight-bearing plantar forefoot (defects, 8 x 5 cm and 6 x 5 cm respectively). This flap is nourished solely by perforators of the medial plantar vessels. The advantages of this flap are the protection of the vascular supply of the foot (because both posterior tibial and medial plantar vascular systems are preserved), anterograde flow of the vascular supply (which gives an additional advantage of expecting less venous insufficiency compared with reverse-flow flaps), no dependence on retrograde vascular communications, minimal donor site morbidity, and transport of structurally similar tissues to the plantar forefoot.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/27. Cross-leg free anterolateral thigh perforator flap: a case report.

    The purpose of this report is to introduce the cross-leg anterolateral thigh perforator flap for closure of a defect on the dorsum of the foot, and to show that the anterolateral thigh perforator flap is a safe option for a cross-bridge microvascular anastomosis in defects of the extremity. The free anterolateral thigh perforator flap was used for a patient with an unhealed wound on the dorsum of the foot. The flap was revascularized by end-to-side anastomosis between the flap's artery and the posterior tibial artery of the other leg, since there was no available recipient artery on the same leg. After a 4-week neovascularization period, the pedicle was cut. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a free anterolateral thigh perforator flap for a cross-bridge microvascular anastomosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Foot Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.