Cases reported "Foreign Bodies"

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1/201. Button battery ingestion: a solution to a management dilemma.

    There is a dilemma in the management of ingested intact button batteries in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract distal to the oesophagus: whether to do an emergency laparotomy or to adopt a wait-and-watch policy. In this case report an effective, safe, and quick method of GI lavage was used and a button battery was expelled successfully from the stomach without resorting to laparotomy or endoscopy.
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keywords = esophagus
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2/201. Submucosal esophageal dissection--a rare case report.

    The severity of submucosal dissection is intermediate between transmural rupture and mucosal tear in the esophagus. We describe a case of submucosal dissection of the esophagus with characteristic features of mucosal bridge endoscopically and "double-barreled" in radiography. The patient was successfully treated by intermittent esophageal tamponade of 5-day duration using a Sengstaken-Blackmore tube, and total parenteral nutrition. His course was uneventful in a follow-up period of 5 years.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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3/201. Button battery ingestion: hazards of esophageal impaction.

    Ingestion of button batteries has been seen with increasing frequency over the past decade. In a small number of reported cases, their impaction in the esophagus has led to serious, sometimes fatal, complications. The management of these cases has varied from expectant, supportive therapy to early surgical intervention. The authors report 2 pediatric patients in whom esophageal perforation developed after impaction of a disc battery. Both were treated conservatively with successful outcomes.
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keywords = esophagus
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4/201. Ingested ring-pull causing bronchoesophageal fistula and transection of the left main bronchus: successful salvage of the left lung and esophagus five years after injury.

    A 6-year-old girl with a history of ingestion of a ring-pull of a can and a transient episode of stridor had been asymptomatic 3 years before admission when left lung atelectasis with severe respiratory distress developed. fluoroscopy and 3-dimensional computed tomography scan showed bronchoesophageal fistula and the ring-pull around the left main bronchus. At operation, the ring-pull, which transected the left main bronchus, was extracted. The left main bronchus was reconstructed by end-to-end anastomosis in spite of insufficient inflation of the collapsed left lung. The esophageal defect was repaired. The patient's respiratory distress gradually disappeared, and the x-ray films 3 months after operation showed complete expansion of the left lung. This case shows the risk of the long-term retained esophageal foreign body and the possibility of pulmonary salvage after long-term total atelectasis of the lung.
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ranking = 4
keywords = esophagus
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5/201. Ingested endotracheal tube in an adult following intubation attempt for head injury.

    General surgeons are often consulted for assistance in the management of ingested foreign bodies. deglutition of an endotracheal tube is an unusual complication of airway management. In these cases, the artificial airway is "lost" when it becomes lodged deep into the esophagus. Endoscopic extraction has been described as therapeutic. We report a case in which prehospital endotracheal intubation attempt for the management of closed head injury resulted in a swallowed endotracheal tube. The tube remained undetected until radiographs were performed for a second unrelated traumatic event 2 years later. Endoscopic extraction was unsuccessful, due to rigidity of the tube. Surgical extraction via gastrotomy was uneventful. Surgeons involved in trauma and other emergency settings should be aware of this complication and options in management.
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keywords = esophagus
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6/201. An unusual cause of tracheal stenosis.

    PURPOSE: To report a large chronic tracheal foreign body, causing tracheal stenosis in an 11-yr-old girl. CLINICAL FEATURES: The history was suggestive of obstructive airways disease with secondary bronchiectasis. Physical findings were crepitations and rhonchi all over the chest. blood gases were normal. Chest X-ray showed bronchiectasis and a ventilation perfusion scan identified a tracheo-esophageal fistula. During anesthesia to confirm this, intubation and ventilation were difficult because of tracheal stenosis. The hypoventilation resulted in severe hypercarbia and acidosis. A subsequent CT scan showed a stenosis of 2 mm diameter and 1 cm length in the middle third of trachea, bronchiectasis, and an air filled pocket between the trachea and esophagus. PFT showed a severe obstruction. Antitubercular treatment which was started on the presumptive diagnosis of tuberculous stenosis and tracheoesophageal fistula caused a delay with deterioration of patient from intermittent dyspnea to orthopnea with severe hypecarbia and acidosis. The anesthetic management of the tracheal reconstruction was difficult due to her moribund condition even after medical treatment, the short length of the trachea above the obstruction, its severity and lack of resources for alternative techniques. A large foreign body was found lying obliquely in the trachea dividing it into an anterior narrow airway mimicking a stenosed trachea, and a wider posterior blind passage. CONCLUSION: The anesthetic consequences were peculiar to the unexpected etiology of the stenosis and poor general condition of the patient. Minor details like the tracheal tube bevel and ventilatory pattern became vitally important.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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7/201. Acute suppurative thyroiditis due to foreign body-induced retropharyngeal abscess presented as thyrotoxicosis.

    Acute suppurative thyroiditis is an uncommon condition. Most patients have preexisting oropharyngeal fistulae. Penetrating oropharyngeal injuries resulting from swallowed foreign bodies provide an acquired channel of infection spreading into the relatively resistant thyroid gland. The authors describe a patient with infective thyroiditis complicating retropharyngeal abscess caused by a chicken bone that perforated the upper esophagus. Transient thyrotoxicosis complicating acute suppurative thyroiditis is very rare. Pertechnetate and Ga-67 scans confirmed extensive inflammation of the thyroid gland and the release of hormones as the cause, as distinct from concurrent Graves' disease. awareness of this unusual complication is important to avoid inappropriate treatment for hyperthyroid disease.
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keywords = esophagus
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8/201. Respiratory distress due to esophageal perforation caused by ball point ingestion.

    A 15-month-old girl who developed respiratory distress which persisted for three days prior to admission demonstrated pleural effusion on the chest x-ray which was determined to be due to esophageal perforation caused by the ingestion of a ball point. A gastrotomy was performed to extract the ball point. A gastrostomy was performed and a chest tube was inserted. The esophagus was normal radiologically within one month. Foreign body ingestion may cause esophageal perforation in childhood. If it goes unnoticed and a diagnosis is delayed, there is danger of the more hazardous development of mediastinitis. It is important that a child with respiratory distress also be evaluated for esophageal foreign body ingestion.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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9/201. brain abscess following delayed endoscopic removal of an initially asymptomatic esophageal coin.

    Brain abscesses are rare occurrences in pediatric patients, and making their diagnosis can be difficult. The two most commonly cited risk factors are otorhinologic infections and cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). We present a 13-month-old child with a brain abscess who, 2 weeks prior, underwent rigid endoscopy for the extraction of a coin from the esophagus. We believe this to be the first such report of a brain abscess after rigid endoscopy for removal of an esophageal foreign body. In this case the esophageal coin was initially asymptomatic and had been present for weeks prior to removal. The potential association between delayed coin extraction and development of an intracranial infection, suggested by this report, may warrant investigation.
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keywords = esophagus
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10/201. Esophageal foreign body presenting with stridor: report of one case.

    We report a case of a 12-month-old infant who developed acute respiratory distress with stridor from an impacted proximal esophageal foreign body. She was treated inappropriately as upper respiratory infections prior to the validation of the presenting complaint. Difficulties in diagnosis of esophageal foreign bodies arise, when the patient presents with atypical symptoms. Clinical suspicion remains the most important aid to diagnosis and endoscopic examination is essential for the diagnosis and successful management of foreign bodies in the esophagus.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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