Cases reported "Foreign Bodies"

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1/43. Hazard: denture clasps embedded in oral tissues--case reports.

    Three patients presented with their dentures stuck in their mouths due to a retainer clasp becoming embedded in either the anterior fauces or the soft palate. All three dentures were extricated successfully and the resulting puncture wounds were left to heal spontaneously with only antibiotics and analgesics. In all three cases, a sharp pointed molar clasp tip was found to be a common factor. The management and prevention of such cases are presented.
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2/43. Tracheal rupture: a rare complication related to foreign body aspiration.

    A one-year-old patient admitted following foreign body aspiration and referred following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a local hospital was diagnosed to have tracheobronchial rupture. We first assumed puncture of the mucous membrane of the left main bronchus by the tip of the tube. Later, we thought that the rupture might have been caused by rigid bronchoscopy. Etiology and treatment are discussed and recent literature reviewed.
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3/43. tongue piercing and insertion of metal studs: three cases of dental and oral consequences.

    "Body art" is a fashion that appears to be gaining popularity worldwide. There are many risks and potentially adverse results associated with tongue piercing. pain (the procedure is performed without anesthetics), post-placement edema and the risk of prolonged bleeding, if the blood vessels are punctured during the piercing, and fracture of tooth structures, are but a few of the risks. The purpose of the present article is to describe the consequences of three cases of tongue piercing in which metallic barbell-shaped studs were inserted: the consequences include the fracture of tooth structure, caused by the device knocking against the teeth; and inflammation and edema occurred as a result of the piercing of the tongue.
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4/43. High-pressure injection injuries to the hand.

    High-pressure injection injury hides the true extent of the lesions behind an apparent small and harmless puncture of the finger or the hand. Through clinical description, we wish to point out the need for prompt treatment to avoid mutilating and function-threatening complications. We wish to outline the role of the emergency physician who must be aware of the incidence of high-pressure injection injury and become accustomed to early referral to a surgeon, experienced in extensive surgical exploration, removal of foreign bodies, and rehabilitation. The open-wound technique gives the best results. We also point out that failure to refer may become an increasing focus of negligence claims.
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5/43. Absence of hemodynamic and ECG changes in a patient with traumatic left ventricular injury and puncture of the left anterior descending branch.

    patients with penetrating cardiac injury usually present with cardiac tamponade and shock upon hospital arrival. However, absence of hemodynamic depression does not exclude a potentially fatal injury of the heart. This article reports on a patient who developed neither hemodynamic depression nor ECG changes for several hours, despite two left ventricular lacerations with puncture of the LAD. echocardiography is advocated as the diagnostic tool of choice, and it is emphasized that no penetrating objects should be removed from the wound before surgical access to the heart is established, as this may result in the sudden development of cardiac tamponade.
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6/43. neck needle foreign bodies: an added risk for autopsy pathologists.

    The risk to pathologists of contracting diseases due to cuts or needles punctures while performing autopsies is well known. An additional risk is an accidental needle puncture due to retained needle fragments within the subcutaneous tissues or internal organs of intravenous drug addicts. We report 4 cases of drug addicted patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus who came to autopsy and had retained needle fragments within their cervical-clavicular soft tissues. The presence of retained needle fragments increases the risk to the autopsy pathologist of accidental needle puncture and exposure to disease. Because of this phenomenon, the pathologist should take precautions in addition to those currently prescribed when performing autopsies on possible drug abusers.
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7/43. rubber foreign bodies in puncture wounds of the foot in patients wearing rubber-soled shoes.

    We report 8 cases of puncture wound of the foot associated with rubber foreign bodies in patients who were wearing rubber-soled shoes. The difficulty in making the correct diagnosis and the complications arising from these injuries are reviewed. The morbidity associated with these seemingly innocuous puncture wounds can be serious. Infective complications resolved only with removal of all imbedded rubber foreign bodies. A history of wearing rubber-soled shoes during the injury and a high index of suspicion may prevent complications.
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8/43. Gastric perforation due to the ingestion of a hollow toothpick: report of a case.

    A perforation due to the ingestion of a toothpick is a condition seldom seen in the stomach. We herein describe an 80-year-old woman with a perforation of the stomach due to an ingested hollow toothpick. The toothpick was easily removed during a mini-laparotomy. The site of perforation was closed with absorbable sutures and omentum was used to function as an overlying patch. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. The hollow toothpick functioned as a fistula between the contents of the stomach and the peritoneal cavity. This resulted in a very different clinical picture from that observed in "classical wooden" toothpick injury, where the toothpick is not able to function as a fistula. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a hollow toothpick perforating the stomach. A hollow toothpick perforation must be considered in any patient with symptoms of intestinal perforation, even when there is no history of swallowing toothpicks. Removal of a toothpick and subsequent suturing of the puncture site is a simple and relatively minor surgical procedure, which may have a lower morbidity and mortality as compared to other causes of gastric perforation. A precaution to observe, is the potential danger that one of the members of the operating team might perforate a finger.
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9/43. Accidental implantation of a bur tip in the elbow of a dentist. A possible pathway for inoculation with deadly infectious agent.

    The most common source of occupational injury to dentists is percutaneous puncture of the hands from "sharps". We report a percutaneous injury involving a dentist where the tip of a dental bur became implanted in his elbow. The dentist had been vaccinated against hepatitis b and both the patient and dentist were hiv and hepatitis b seronegative immediately after the incident. Surgical exploration of the dentist's elbow the following day was unsuccessful in locating the bur tip. The dentist remains healthy and is not incapacitated as a result of the injury, despite retention of the bur tip. This accident has implications for modifying the design of present and future dental units. We are not aware of a previous report of this type of injury.
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10/43. Colonoscopic identification of a foreign body causing an hepatic abscess.

    BACKGROUND: Hepatic abscesses often result from a perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although rare, this may occur via puncture by a foreign body. The object may directly extend from the stomach or duodenum into the liver, or rarely, the object may perforate the bowel distal to the duodenum and indirectly extend to the liver leading to the formation of an abscess. CASE REPORT: A 44-year-old man developed an hepatic abscess. Although the abscess was identified on computed tomography, various imaging studies were unable to identify the cause of the infection. After an extended ICU course, the patient was deemed stable enough to undergo a colonoscopy that demonstrated a foreign body penetrating through the wall of the sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: Here we describe the first report of a foreign body leading to a hepatic abscess where the object was identified by colonoscopy. In addition, we present a comprehensive literature review examining the method of identification of gastrointestinal foreign bodies that led to liver abscesses. These findings emphasize that in cases of hepatic abscesses of unknown etiology, direct visualization by colonoscopy may be a useful tool to elucidate the cause of the abscess.
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