Cases reported "Foreign Bodies"

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1/111. Odontogenic sinusitis causing orbital cellulitis.

    BACKGROUND: Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition that usually is responsive to standard medical and surgical treatment. Current antibiotic therapy recommendations are directed against the usual odontogenic and sinus flora. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present a case of a patient with acute sinusitis initiated by a complicated tooth extraction that did not yield readily to standard treatment. The case was complicated by orbital extension of the sinusitis. The authors isolated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, species from the affected sinus that usually is not encountered in uncomplicated acute nonnosocomial or odontogenic sinusitis. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Though such forms of resistant microbial flora as MRSA are rare, they may be seen in patients who have a history of intravenous, or i.v., drug use and in immunocompromised patients. Management of patients with orbital extension of sinusitis requires hospitalization and i.v. antibiotic treatment.
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2/111. Asymptomatic gastric perforation by a toothpick. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Many cases of gastric perforation with peritonitis, pylephlebitis, hepatic abscesses, or lethal bleeding, caused by ingested long and sharp objects, are reported in the literature. methods: During a right hepatectomy for a giant hemangioma, a wooden toothpick was found between the two layers of the hepatogastric ligament. It was not possible to find the passage of the foreign body through the gastric wall. The patient did not report any correlated symptoms. RESULTS: There was no sign of inflammation around the toothpick, which was enveloped in thin scar tissue. The removal of the foreign body was performed without complications. CONCLUSIONS: The peculiarity of our case is the total absence of symptoms during and after the perforation. Despite the benign evolution of our case, toothpicks must be considered as potentially dangerous, like other pointed objects, and, therefore, removed immediately. copyright copyright 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel
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keywords = tooth
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3/111. A case of stapler pin in the root canal--extending beyond the apex.

    There have been several reports describing the placement, by patients, of foreign objects into exposed pulp chambers and canals. In the present case, a 13-year-old patient reported with complaints of pain and a history of inserting a foreign object into the root canal of the left central incisor. On examination the foreign body was found to be a stapler pin which was projecting 5 millimeters from the apical foramen. foreign bodies discovered from the root canal have varied from radiolucent objects like wooden tooth picks or tooth brush bristles to radioopaque materials like paper pins, needles, pencil leads etc. In the present case, despite our best efforts, the patient did not agree to undergo any treatment except for the extraction of the left central incisor.
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keywords = tooth
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4/111. Foreign body in a mandibular permanent molar--a case report.

    A thirteen-year-old boy was examined in the Department of Pedodontics during a school-screening programme. On examination the left mandibular first permanent molar was found to be grossly destroyed. On radiographic evaluation a radio opaque screw shaped foreign object was seen in the pulp chamber of the said tooth. Retrieval of the foreign object was tried but the attempt was unsuccessful and an extraction was planned. A case of a unique foreign object in the pulp chamber of the tooth is reported.
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5/111. Loss of upper permanent central incisor teeth. Case report.

    A case is reported in which elastic bands caused irreversible periodontal destruction around upper central incisor teeth. Every practitioner should be aware of the hazards associated with the use of elastic bands in minor tooth movement.
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keywords = tooth
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6/111. tongue piercing and insertion of metal studs: three cases of dental and oral consequences.

    "Body art" is a fashion that appears to be gaining popularity worldwide. There are many risks and potentially adverse results associated with tongue piercing. pain (the procedure is performed without anesthetics), post-placement edema and the risk of prolonged bleeding, if the blood vessels are punctured during the piercing, and fracture of tooth structures, are but a few of the risks. The purpose of the present article is to describe the consequences of three cases of tongue piercing in which metallic barbell-shaped studs were inserted: the consequences include the fracture of tooth structure, caused by the device knocking against the teeth; and inflammation and edema occurred as a result of the piercing of the tongue.
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7/111. Hepatic inflammatory mass secondary to toothpick perforation of the stomach: triphasic CT appearances.

    Unintentional ingestion of foreign bodies is common in daily life. The unintentional ingestion of sharp foreign bodies such as toothpicks, fish bones and chicken bones carries a significant risk of perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. Herein, we report a case of hepatic inflammatory mass complicated by the perforation of an ingested toothpick that had a distinctive enhancement pattern on dynamic computed tomograms (CT). Understanding the phenomenon of enhancement in triphasic CT study is the basis in differentiating liver neoplasms.
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ranking = 6
keywords = tooth
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8/111. Aspiration of an avulsed primary incisor. A case report.

    A 7-year-old girl had injured her maxillary primary incisors in a playground. One of the already-mobile incisors had been avulsed. The child who had a cough and breathing difficulties during sleep was diagnosed as suffering from upper respiratory infection and was treated with antibiotics. A few days later because her body temperature was elevated a chest radiograph was taken. The radiograph revealed an aspirated tooth in her right bronchus with atelectasis of the lower lobe. The tooth was removed by bronchoscopy. dentists should suspect any tooth that has been avulsed and not found as possibly aspirated.
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ranking = 3
keywords = tooth
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9/111. Intranasal tooth as a complication of cleft lip and alveolus in a four year old child: case report and literature review.

    Ectopic position of teeth is not rare. The presence of teeth have been reported in ovaries, testes, anterior mediastinum, and pre-sacral regions. In the maxillofacial region, teeth have been found in maxillary sinus, mandibular condyle, coronoid process, chin, nose, and even orbit. Approximately 50 cases of a tooth in the nasal cavity have been reported in literature. However, an intranasal tooth in cases of cleft lip and palate is comparatively rare. Intranasal teeth can cause problems such as nasal obstruction, chronic rhinorrhea and speech problems. Sometimes however, they are totally symptom-free. We present here an interesting case of an intranasal tooth in a four year-old-boy, who was operated on for cleft lip and alveolus at 6 months of age. The intranasal tooth did not cause any symptoms. The tooth was extracted under general anaesthesia when it was found to be very loosely attached to the nasal mucosa. The case is discussed in the light of relevant literature on intranasal teeth in cases of cleft lip and palate.
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ranking = 9
keywords = tooth
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10/111. Don't forget your toothbrush!

    patients with rectally inserted foreign bodies can present to accident and emergency departments or general medical practitioners. Rarely dentally related objects are inserted because of their ready availability in the domestic environment. There are many reasons given for their presence in the rectum, most commonly accidental insertion, assault, and psychosexual motives. This case is the first reported incident of a patient using a toothbrush to relieve his pruritus ani and subsequently losing it up into the rectum.
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