Cases reported "Foreign-Body Migration"

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11/90. Intra-abdominal needles: an enigma (a report of two cases).

    Ingested sharp metallic bodies perforate the gut surprisingly rarely. Perforation and migration of such a foreign body may be silent. patients may present with unrelated symptoms and the discovery of foreign body on radiological examination of the abdomen may come as a surprise. history of ingestion is usually difficult to obtain. foreign bodies after perforation have been reported to migrate to almost any intraabdominal or rarely to even extra-abdominal sites. Migration to the liver, mesentery or the anterior abdominal wall, however, is extremely rare. We report two cases of young women with two ingested needles in each which perforated silently and in one case migrated to the liver and the anterior abdominal wall while in the other they migrated to the mesentery of the small intestine and the anterior abdominal wall.
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ranking = 1
keywords = metal
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12/90. Endoscopic retrieval of a broken and migrated esophageal metal stent.

    In patients with inoperable malignant tumors of the esophagus or cardia, self-expanding metal stents are increasingly used to improve dysphagia. Usually, they are not difficult to place and, as compared to conventional plastic stents, complications such as stent migration or perforation, seem to occur less frequently. This is a report on a young patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the cardia, who was treated with a self expanding metal stent after endoscopic dilatation of a tumor stenosis in the distal esophagus. Immediately after the procedure, he was able to eat and gained weight. Within 6 weeks and while on continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil, the patient complained about recurrent severe dysphagia. Plain x-ray demonstrated a broken and migrated stent, the 2 parts of which were seen in the stomach and the duodenum. The stent could be extracted endoscopically without any complication, but the procedure was difficult and lasted 4 h, as the stent broke 2 more times during retrieval.
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ranking = 6
keywords = metal
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13/90. embolism of a metallic clip: an unusual complication following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    A 32-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy during which there was severe bleeding from the bed of the gallbladder. As application of metallic clips to control the bleeding was not successful, the operation was converted to an open laparotomy. cholecystectomy was successfully completed without further complications, and the post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged. Eighteen months later, the patient complained of dyspnea. Plain radiograph and computed tomography of the thorax showed a metallic clip in the branch of the pulmonary artery supplying the posterior basal segment of the inferior lobe of the left lung. There was no connection between the patient's symptoms and the clip embolism. Nevertheless, clip migration or embolism could cause severe complications. Therefore, metallic clips should not be used to stop bleeding from the gallbladder bed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = metal
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14/90. Choledochal stenosis and lithiasis caused by penetration and migration of surgical metal clips.

    A 71-year-old woman, who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy 1 year previously at our hospital, presented with abdominal pain, high fever, and jaundice. She was diagnosed with choledochal stenosis caused by migration of the clips that were used at the previous operation. At reoperation, the common bile duct was successfully dissected, including the stenotic site, where a metal clip was found to be penetrating the duct wall. The stenotic site was sufficiently resected, when a black-brown gallstone was found proximally to the stenosis. Interestingly, the stone was found to contain two metal clips, which were considered to have migrated into the bile duct and to have acted as a nidus for stone formation. The common bile duct was reconstructed by direct end-to-end anastomosis. Surgeons must exercise caution in the use of metal clips, keeping in mind the potential risk of clip migration.
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ranking = 7
keywords = metal
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15/90. Infusion port dislodgement of bilateral breast tissue expanders after MRI.

    Tissue expanders are placed routinely for breast reconstruction, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a common diagnostic procedure. Many studies have reported on the safety of MRI in patients with nonferromagnetic implants; however, many tissue expanders contain ferromagnetic components. The authors present a case of bilateral tissue expander infusion port dislodgment after MRI. A 56-year-old woman underwent bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with McGhan BIOSPAN tissue expanders. These implants contain integral nonferromagnetic infusion ports, as well as small, powerful Magna-Site magnets. Several weeks postoperatively the patient underwent MRI of her spine, which was ordered by her primary physician for back pain. Subsequently, the infusion ports could not be located with the finder magnet. A chest radiograph was obtained, which demonstrated bilateral dislodgment of the infusion ports. Surgical removal and replacement of the tissue expanders were required. safety considerations of MRI have been discussed extensively in the literature, and data on MRI with various implanted devices have been obtained. The potential risks of performing MRI on patients with metallic implants include conduction of electrical currents, heating of the implant, misinterpretation resulting from artifact, and the possibility of movement or dislodgment of the implant. The small magnet integral to many tissue expanders may be overlooked by patients and physicians during pre-MRI screening. All patients undergoing tissue expansion with implants that contain integral ports should be thoroughly warned about the potential hazards of MRI.
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ranking = 1
keywords = metal
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16/90. Delayed effects of a migrated foreign body (sewing needle) in the cervical spine: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report is presented. OBJECTIVE: This report documents one case of intraspinal migration of a metal foreign body. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The migration and penetration of foreign bodies into the spine have been described, but there are only three reports of a needle as the causative object. methods: This case report included a chart review, an examination of the patient, and a literature search. RESULTS: The patient successfully underwent surgery, in which the foreign body (a sewing needle) was removed. CONCLUSION: It is important to be aware of the possible delayed penetration of a foreign body into the spine even in patients with few or no symptoms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = metal
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17/90. Late arthroscopic debridement of metal fragments and synovectomy after penetrating knee joint injury by low-velocity missile: a report of two cases.

    Retained metal debris from intraarticular missile injury to the knee may produce mechanical symptoms and synovitis. Arthroscopic debridement and thorough synovectomy can relieve symptoms and allow early return of function.
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ranking = 5
keywords = metal
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18/90. Surgical clips as a nidus for stone formation in the common bile duct.

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with symptomatic gallbladder stones. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed using metallic clips. Three years later, she underwent a endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for interscapular and right upper quadrant pain, jaundice, and fever. This examination revealed a stone and clips in the common bile duct (CBD). A sphinteroctomy was undertaken, but the stone could not be extracted despite multiple attempts. Ultimately, a Kocher incision was required to achieve choledocotomy and extraction of the stone and the clips.
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ranking = 1
keywords = metal
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19/90. Clip migration causes choledocholithiasis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    The migration of surgical clips after laparoscopic procedures was first reported in 1992, but such instances are extremely rare. We herein demonstrate a case of a migrated metal clip, which had been applied originally to the cystic duct, but thereafter had moved to the common bile duct. This clip caused choledocholithiasis in a patient 1 year after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A 63-year-old man underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During the operation, the inflamed cystic duct was divided accidentally, and three clips were applied immediately. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain from postoperative day 8. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated bile leakage from the cystic duct, but showed no clips or choledochal stones. The patient complained of severe upper abdominal and back pain 1 year after the operation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed a metal clip in the common bile duct and choledochal stones above the clip. The clip and the cholesterol stones were removed using a basket catheter. Three clips applied to the cystic duct should have been removed because of the necrosis in the remaining cystic duct. Thereafter, the clip may have migrated through the stump of the cystic duct into the lower part of the common bile duct. This clip seems to have later caused choledocholithiasis resulting from stagnation of the bile flow. Bile leakage after an operation seems to increase the risk of clip migration. Regardless of the primary lesion, a careful follow-up evaluation is necessary for patients demonstrating complications.
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ranking = 2
keywords = metal
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20/90. Expandable metallic stents should not be used in the treatment of benign esophageal strictures.

    Expandable metallic stents have become popular in recent years for the treatment of esophageal strictures. While they are undoubtedly of great value in the palliation of malignant strictures and tracheo-esophageal fistulas, there is concern over their use for the treatment of benign diseases. We report three cases, in which such problems were seen following stent insertion for benign esophageal strictures. All three patients developed further strictures above the stents, one was complicated by a tracheo-esophageal fistula and two stents (in one patient) migrated distally into the stomach. Two of the patients underwent subsequent esophageal surgery. In both cases, this proved extremely difficult and hazardous because of the intense fibrotic reaction induced by the stents. Expandable mesh stents should not be used for the treatment of benign esophageal strictures without careful consideration of the potential problems, which can include rendering the problem inoperable.
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ranking = 5
keywords = metal
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