Cases reported "Foreign-Body Migration"

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11/63. Percutaneous retrieval of a proximally migrated common bile duct endoprosthesis from the right anterior duct.

    common bile duct (CBD) endoprostheses that are inserted at endoscopy are in routine clinical use to decompress the obstructed biliary tract. This case describes the proximal migration of a CBD endoprosthesis into the right anterior duct. An attempt at endoscopic retrieval failed. The endoprosthesis was retrieved by a percutaneous transhepatic approach using an Amplatz goose-neck snare. To the best of our knowledge, use of the Amplatz goose-neck snare has not been reported for this application.
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keywords = neck
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12/63. A rare case of a foreign body migration from the upper digestive tract to the subcutaneous neck.

    Ingested foreign bodies are not unusual in singapore. The most common of these objects are fish bones, which typically become lodged in the tonsils or in the base of the tongue. We report a rare case of an ingested fish bone that migrated from the upper digestive tract and into the soft tissues of the neck just below the skin.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = neck
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13/63. Peritoneal shunt migration into the pulmonary artery--case report.

    A 48-year-old man underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting for hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage due to left vertebral artery dissection, which had been successfully treated by trapping. The peritoneal catheter was correctly positioned via a right upper abdominal incision, and symptoms related to the hydrocephalus disappeared. One month later, the patient began to complain of pain on the right side of the neck. Chest radiography revealed that the peritoneal end of the catheter had migrated into the right pulmonary artery. The catheter route was explored through a small neck incision, and was found to enter the external jugular vein. The catheter was extracted and repositioned into the peritoneum. This type of shunt migration is quite unusual, but could be lethal by causing pulmonary infarction or arrhythmia. The catheter had probably entered the external jugular vein through a perforation caused by the shunt guide during the ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Follow-up radiography should be scheduled to detect such a complication.
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keywords = neck
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14/63. Delayed suture intravesical migration as a complication of a Stamey endoscopic bladder neck suspension.

    We report our experience with two cases of late migration of the suture and bolster occurring 2 years after a modified Stamey endoscopic bladder neck suspension. Delayed migration of the suture and bolster after an endoscopic bladder neck suspension across tissue planes, with subsequent erosion into the bladder, is uncommon. Recurrent urinary tract infection and mild suprapubic discomfort were the only symptoms. cystoscopy was the only helpful diagnostic tool and should be considered early in the evaluation of this kind of patients. The mechanism of migration of the cuff and the operative technique are discussed.
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ranking = 3
keywords = neck
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15/63. A foreign body in the pharynx migrating through the internal jugular vein.

    We present an unusual and a rare case study of a 45-year-old woman who had swallowed a sharp pointed metallic foreign body while eating meat. The foreign body had migrated from the cricopharynx through the parapharyngeal space and penetrated the internal jugular vein over a period of 10 days presenting as a tender neck swelling. The management of this case is discussed here in brief.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
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16/63. Management of neuroform stent dislodgement and misplacement.

    A self-expanding stent has recently been introduced for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. We describe two cases of stent malposition within large aneurysms. In the first case, the stent was dislodged during microcatheterization. This was managed by placement of a second stent through the interstices of the first followed by aneurysm coiling. In the second case, after deployment, the proximal portion of the stent moved into the aneurysm as the exchange guidewire was removed. This patient was treated by vessel sacrifice.
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keywords = neck
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17/63. Pharyngolaryngeal migration: a delayed complication of an impacted bullet in the neck.

    We present a case of a patient who sustained a bullet wound to the mouth and face resulting in impaction of the foreign body in the neck. This was initially managed conservatively until migration into the supralaryngeal area occurred. This resulted in airway obstruction, dysphagia, and dysphonia necessitating resuscitation and per-operative intrapharyngeal removal. Bullet wounds are uncommon in this country and experience with these cases is lacking. This paper discusses the various management options and the mechanism of how the bullet became lodged in the tissues of the neck.
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ranking = 3
keywords = neck
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18/63. Pars plana suture fixation for intraocular lenses dislocated into the vitreous cavity using a closed-eye cow-hitch technique.

    We describe a modified intraocular cow-hitch technique for pars plana suture fixation of intraocular lenses (IOLs) that dislocated into the vitreous cavity in 3 patients who had a 3-port vitrectomy and IOL implantation because of retinal disease. To reposition the dislocated IOL after the residual vitreous was removed, 2 additional sclerotomies for suture fixation were made 3.0 mm posterior to the limbus. A loop (cow-hitch knot) was made with 10-0 polypropylene for suture fixation. After the neck of the cow-hitch loop was grasped with an intraocular forceps, the loop was used to lasso a haptic of the dislocated IOL, which was then pulled forward to the sclerotomy. The same procedure was used for the other haptic, and both sutures were secured to the sclera under scleral flaps. In all patients, the dislocated IOLs were repositioned without the need for extraction. The procedures were uneventful. Pars plana suture fixation with the intraocular cow-hitch technique can be used to reposition an IOL that has dislocated into the vitreous cavity.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
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19/63. Self-extrusion of a foreign body from the upper digestive tract to the skin.

    Migrated ingested foreign bodies from the upper digestive tract have the potential to cause life-threatening complications. Cases of spontaneous expulsion to the skin of the neck are very rare. We present an unusual case of an ingested foreign body that migrated out of the upper digestive tract and self-extruded via the skin of the neck. An approach to the safe management of such seemingly innocuous foreign bodies is discussed. This report highlights the message that non-found ingested foreign bodies should be treated seriously due to the possibility of migration and resulting complications.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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20/63. Metallic fragment embolization to the middle cerebral artery.

    A 25-year-old male was wounded accidentally in the neck by a metallic fragment, which penetrated his right carotid artery and migrated within the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. Clinical and laboratory findings over a 16-month-period are reported. Problems arising from the presence of metallic emboli to the cerebral circulation are discussed on the basis of the pertinent literature.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
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