Cases reported "Foreign-Body Migration"

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1/33. hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PURPOSE: To report a 63-year-old man with a retained intraocular foreign body who developed a hyphema during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. methods: Case report and review of the current literature on ocular injury caused by intraocular foreign bodies when subjected to an electromagnetic field. RESULTS: Our patient underwent a brain MRI, and the intraocular foreign body caused a hyphema and increased intraocular pressure. The presence and location of the intraocular foreign body were determined by computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSION: magnetic resonance imaging can cause serious ocular injury in patients with ferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining an occupational history, and, when indicated, a skull x-ray or CT to rule out intraocular foreign body before an MRI study.
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2/33. Endoscopic retrieval of a broken and migrated esophageal metal stent.

    In patients with inoperable malignant tumors of the esophagus or cardia, self-expanding metal stents are increasingly used to improve dysphagia. Usually, they are not difficult to place and, as compared to conventional plastic stents, complications such as stent migration or perforation, seem to occur less frequently. This is a report on a young patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the cardia, who was treated with a self expanding metal stent after endoscopic dilatation of a tumor stenosis in the distal esophagus. Immediately after the procedure, he was able to eat and gained weight. Within 6 weeks and while on continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil, the patient complained about recurrent severe dysphagia. Plain x-ray demonstrated a broken and migrated stent, the 2 parts of which were seen in the stomach and the duodenum. The stent could be extracted endoscopically without any complication, but the procedure was difficult and lasted 4 h, as the stent broke 2 more times during retrieval.
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3/33. Two remarkable events in the field of intraocular foreign body: (1) The reversal of siderosis bulbi. (2) The spontaneous extrusion of an intraocular copper foreign body.

    Two unusual events concerning intraocular foreign bodies are presented. The first patient had an occult or unsuspected intraocular foreign body. He showed iridoplegia with mydriasis, siderosis iridis, and an intraocular piece of iron lying posteriorly near the retina. The foreign body was removed and the patient regained normal iris color and pupillary activity. His vision remains 20/15 six years postoperatively dispite ensuing retinal detachment one year after removal of the foreign body. The second patient was a young boy injured by a blasting cap explosion. He lost one eye from the injury and had a piece of intraocular brass in his left eye. In spite of the development of chalcosis and a mature cataract the lens gradually shrank in the pupillary space permitting a clear aphakic area and 20/25 vision. The brass fragment migrated forward and inferiorly and was finally extruded under the conjunctiva five years later, where it was removed and chemically analyzed by x-ray diffraction.
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4/33. Migration of pacemaker lead into the spinal venous plexus: case report with special reference to Batson's theory of spinal metastasis.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Migration of a foreign material via venous routes into the spinal canal is a very rare incidence. We report the second case in which a foreign body has migrated into the spinal canal via the venous route. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: This 35-years-old man presented with sudden onset of severe low back pain and pain in the right leg four months after an unsuccessful attempt to remove a disconnected cardiac pacemaker lead via the femoral vein. Direct lumbar x-ray demonstrated the broken lead of the cardiac pacemaker at the entrance of the right L5 foramen which was also demonstrated by lumbar CT. SURGICAL INTERVENTION: After right L5 hemilaminotomy, the pacemaker lead was found in a vein of the anterior spinal venous plexus just beneath and lateral to the right L5 root. After dissecting it from the surrounding adipose tissue, the embolised pacemaker lead was taken out. CONCLUSION: We present a case report and review of the literature on migration of foreign material into the spinal canal, factors effecting the flow directions in the spinal veins. This case may be the first evidence that proved Batson's theory of spinal metastases in man.
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5/33. The intravenous foreign body: a report of 2 cases.

    Two cases of metallic foreign body injury to the upper limb are described. In both cases the foreign body was clearly visible on x-rays, considered to be lodged in the soft tissues, but migrated to one of the large subcutaneous veins. One subsequently migrated to the heart; the other was removed from the peripheral vein.
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6/33. Unusual migration of the distal catheter of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt into the heart: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is the most common form of treatment for hydrocephalus. Thoracic complications with VP shunts are rare, but we present the second documented case of the distal migration of the distal catheter of a VP shunt into the heart. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 14-year-old boy, who underwent placement of a right occipital VP shunt at another institution after closed-head injury, presented with hypertension. Plain chest x-rays and computed tomography revealed the distal catheter to be in the right ventricle of the heart. INTERVENTION: A joint surgical procedure was performed with the cardiac surgery team. The cardiac surgeons created a pericardial window through a subxyphoid incision. Simultaneously, a right occipital incision was made to access the distal catheter, which was then slowly pulled out with the pericardium under direct visualization. No hemorrhage or change in the pericardium was observed, and, therefore, the need for a thoracotomy was eliminated. A new distal catheter was placed into the peritoneal cavity. CONCLUSION: The migration of the distal catheter probably occurred during the initial VP shunt placement. The internal jugular vein probably was perforated by the tunneler during the creation of the distal catheter tract. Slow venous flow and negative inspiratory pressure may have gradually pulled the catheter up into the right atria and ventricle. As demonstrated by our case report, the catheter can be extracted safely in a joint procedure with cardiac surgeons, and a thoracotomy is not always necessary. The patient did not experience postoperative complications, and his hypertension was alleviated.
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7/33. Late hydrocephalus in a case of wandering bullet into the pineal region.

    We report a patient in whom a bullet in the brain migrated into the pineal region causing hydrocephalus 3 months later. In patients undergoing surgical removal of intracerebral or intraventricular bullets, it is recommended to obtain an x-ray or CT scan on the day of operation. Late hydrocephalus may occur several months after migration of the bullet due to scar tissue.
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8/33. diagnosis of peanut inhalation by MRI.

    A peanut is a commonly inhaled foreign body during childhood. Some cases are difficult to diagnose especially in cases without a clear history of inhalation. We describe a 16-month-old boy presenting with stridor and fever. The chest x-ray suggested inhalation of a foreign body but there was no history of this. A high spot on a T1-weighted chest MRI was due to a peanut which was seen to have moved from the right main bronchus to the left inferior bronchus, between the two MRI studies. MRI can provide information on position and size of the peanut, the conditions of the surrounding tissues and may be also useful in treatment. We consider MRI to be a valuable new method for the diagnosis of peanut inhalation.
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9/33. Sudden suffocation by surgical sponge retained after a 23-year-old thoracic surgery.

    A 70-year-old male patient with a 23-year-old history of right lower lung lobectomy for primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma (T1 N0 M0) presented with recurrent bronchopneumonia and purulent sputum. Pleural callus, lung abscess, bronchopleural fistula, and stitch granulomas were confirmed by chest x-ray, computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy in the background of his complaints. An attempt to remove the bronchial purulent discharge and tissue sampling was made by using a flexible bronchoscope. The area of the lower trachea suddenly became clogged during bronchoscopic removal of the suspected piece of tissue (which later turned out to be organizing surgical gauze). The resuscitation following ventricular fibrillation failed to save the patient's life. The forensic postmortem examination confirmed the position of the foreign body extending from the abscess cavity, crossing the midline at carina and obstructing the lower trachea. This foreign body was a remnant of the surgical gauze left behind during a thoracic surgery 23 years ago.
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10/33. Laparoscopic removal of a swallowed sewing needle that migrated into the greater omentum without clinical evidence.

    We report a case of a sewing needle, presumably originating from the transverse colon or the ligament of Treitz, that migrated to the greater omentum. A 24-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with a complaint of abdominal pain which was exacerbated by breathing or any physical activity. Abdominal plain x-ray showed a needle in the left upper abdominal area. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and contrast enhanced x-ray studies was unable to reveal whether the needle was in the colonic lumen. Virtual colonoscopy examination demonstrated that the foreign body was not in the lumen. The foreign body was removed from the patient's greater omentum in a fluoroscopy- guided laparoscopic surgery. An accurate and rapid diagnosis of a perforation in the gastrointestinal tract as the result of an ingested foreign body is difficult in the absence of peritonitis or abscess formation. In such cases, the virtual colonoscopy is useful if there is uncertainty whether the foreign body is in the lumen. Perioperative fluoroscopy can be useful to overcome the lack of tactile discrimination in laparoscopy, in patients who have been scheduled for surgery who have no signs of the localization of the foreign body (such as abscess or solid organ migration).
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