Cases reported "Foreign-Body Reaction"

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1/38. Foreign body reaction to a metal clip causing a benign bile duct stricture 16 years after open cholecystectomy: report of a case.

    We present herein a case where a benign bile duct stricture developed 16 years after an open cholecystectomy and without any prior symptoms. The patient was thought to have a Klatskin tumor both pre- and intraoperatively and was treated with a resection of the mass and bile duct confluence, while hepaticojejunostomies were also performed to both ducts separately. A pathologic examination of the specimen revealed extensive fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and a nonnecrotizing granulomata. Any hilar mass presenting after upper abdominal surgery should therefore be considered to be potentially a benign bile duct stricture, even with a long symptom-free interval.
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keywords = metal
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2/38. Constrictive pericarditis from an embolized hypodermic needle: radiographic, CT and MR imaging findings.

    We present the radiographic, computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in a woman with constrictive pericarditis due to an embolized hypodermic needle. The chest films revealed pleural effusions but no foreign body. The CT showed pericardial thickening and a linear foreign body of metallic attenuation in the right ventricular apex, and MR imaging revealed a signal void with magnetic susceptibility artifact. This case illustrates the capabilities and limitations of CT and MR imaging in hypodermic needle-induced constrictive pericarditis.
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keywords = metal
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3/38. Subcutaneous injection of elemental mercury with distant skin lesions.

    BACKGROUND: mercury poisoning presents a variety of clinical pictures depending on chemical structure, amount absorbed, total mercury burden, and individual factors. Distant skin lesions, after subcutaneous injection of metallic mercury, have not been previously described. CASE REPORT: We present a homicidal, subcutaneous injection of mercury resulting in widespread skin lesions, remote from the radiologically visible mercury. The lesions appeared at 40 days and began to clear at 6 months after the injection.
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keywords = metal
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4/38. Metallosis mimicking osteomyelitis from a forearm plate retained for 50 years.

    A forearm plate retained for 50 years was removed because an acute inflammation mimicked chronic infection. The radiographs were very confusing. During the operation metallosis was obvious. Despite the general opinion that forearm plates should be kept in place, this probably should not apply to old "historical" hardware of uncertain chemical composition.
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keywords = metal
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5/38. A case of allergic reaction to surgical metal clips inserted for postoperative boost irradiation in a patient undergoing breast-conserving therapy.

    We report a case of a 28-year-old woman with right-sided breast cancer. The patient had been treated for atopic dermatitis since her infancy. She underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in July 1998, and three titanium clips were placed at the margin of the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Two months after surgery, the patient exhibited a rapid exacerbation of atopic dermatitis. Various drugs were suspected to be the cause of the allergic reaction, but the results of a bi-digital O-ring test (BDORT) suggested an allergic reaction to titanium clips. In August 1999, the patient underwent a second operation to remove the titanium clips under local anesthesia. Allergy to surgical titanium clips is a rare complication, but in patients with a history of severe allergic diseases, a preoperative immunologic examination should be performed and the patient's history of metal allergy should be investigated.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = metal
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6/38. Late operative site pain with isola posterior instrumentation requiring implant removal: infection or metal reaction?

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the cause of late operative site pain in six cases of scoliosis managed with Isola posterior instrumentation that required removal of the implants. METHOD: Microbiologic examination of wound swabs and enriched culture of operative tissue specimens was undertaken in all cases. Histologic study of the peri-implant membranes also was conducted. RESULTS: The presentation in all cases was similar: back pain appearing between 12-20 months after surgery, followed by a local wound swelling leading to a wound sinus. In only one of these cases was the discharge positive for bacterial growth. Implant removal was curative. Histologic examination of tissue specimens revealed a neutrophil-rich granulation tissue reaction suggestive of an infective etiology despite the failure to isolate organisms. Within the granulation tissue was metallic debris that varied from very sparse to abundant from fretting at the distal cross-connector junctions. A review of recent literature describing similar problems suggests that late onset spinal pain is a real entity and a major cause of implant removal. CONCLUSIONS: On reviewing the evidence for an infective etiology versus a metallurgic reaction etiology for these cases of late onset spinal pain, it was concluded that a subacute low-grade implant infection was the main cause. Histologic findings would seem to confirm low-grade infection. There may be more than one causative factor for late operative site pain, as it is possible that fretting at cross connection junctions may provide the environment for the incubation of dormant or inactive microbes.
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keywords = metal
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7/38. Paratibial cyst associated with wear debris after total knee arthroplasty.

    We present a case in which a synovial cyst arose from the proximal tibia and expanded in the calf of a patient after total knee arthroplasty. A cystogram showed a direct communication between the joint cavity and the cyst, apparently associated with a screw that penetrated the tibial cortex. Histologic examination of the cyst showed an inflammatory reaction, including macrophages, foreign body giant cells, and metal and polyethylene particles. To our knowledge, this is the first case report illustrating a paraosseous cyst that developed after total knee arthroplasty. Wear debris from the total knee prosthesis may have been responsible for this unusual cyst.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = metal
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8/38. Metal-containing lymph nodes following prosthetic replacement of osseous malignancy: potential role of MR imaging in characterisation.

    The identification of regional lymphadenopathy in patients with bone malignancy treated by excision and insertion of a prosthesis usually indicates metastatic disease. We present two cases in which the lymphadenopathy was due to an uncommon but well-recognized foreign body reaction. This is secondary to the lymphatic uptake of metal debris shed by the prosthesis. In one case the metal within the excised lymph node could be demonstrated on in vitro MR imaging and in retrospect on the original in vivo scans. This condition should be considered when undertaking an MR examination in patients with bone malignancy treated by prosthetic replacement in whom there is a clinical suspicion of metastatic spread to the regional lymph nodes.
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keywords = metal
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9/38. Extensive osteolytic cystlike area associated with polyethylene wear debris adjacent to an aseptic, stable, uncemented unicompartmental knee prosthesis: case report.

    We present the case of a patient who after uncemented unicompartmental knee arthroplasty developed a large osteolytic cystlike area in the lateral aspect of the tibial metaphysis, contralateral to a well-fixed tibial component at revision surgery. The lesion contained fibrotic soft tissue, evidence of a foreign-body giant cell reaction and polyethylene particles, but no metal wear debris, infection, or malignancy. This case demonstrates that there is a direct communication between the joint cavity and the cyst.
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keywords = metal
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10/38. Wear debris from total hip arthroplasty presenting as an intrapelvic mass.

    A granulomatous reaction to the small particles worn off from an implanted prosthesis is a common complication in arthroplasty. The chronic inflammatory response to the wear debris from either the polyethylene or the metal components is thought to be responsible for osteolysis, implant loosening, and finally mechanical failure. Formation of an extra-articular granulomatous tissue mass is uncommon, however. We report a case of a huge granulomatous mass that presented as an intrapelvic tumor. The prosthesis was an Anatomical Medullary Locking (AML) hip arthroplasty with cementless fixation. The polyethylene insert was manufactured by ram extrusion and sterilized with gamma irradiation in air. Fragments of the insert were among the contents in the cystic mass together with black metallic debris. There was no loosening of the prosthesis, and the acetabulum floor was preserved.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
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