Cases reported "Fractures, Bone"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/32. Bilateral sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation: a case report.

    Bilateral sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation of the sacrum with displacement is a rare injury. We found only four such injuries previously reported in the literature. Nonoperative management in this case led to complete functional return and acceptable alignment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/32. Hemophiliac pseudotumor of the sacrum.

    Although the pelvis is a common site for hemophiliac pseudotumors, involvement of the axial skeleton, such as the spine and sacrum, is rare. A rare case of hemophiliac pseudotumor arising from a healed fracture of the sacrum is reported. Findings of plain radiographs, CT, and radionuclide bone scan may simulate tumors of neural origin, but the heterogeneity of MRI is suggestive of hemophiliac pseudotumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/32. The management of burst fractures of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

    Burst fractures of the fifth lumbar vertebra are extremely rare. Three cases of this fracture are reported and the treatment discussed. Two patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and lumbar bracing; the third underwent posterior decompression and instrumentation. All patients showed a loss of lordosis between L4 and the sacrum, this being greatest in the surgically treated patient. It is suggested that current instrumentation cannot adequately maintain this unusual fracture in good alignment and a conservative approach is advocated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/32. Sacral fracture with compression of cauda equina: surgical treatment.

    Fractures of the sacrum are rare and generally accompany fractures of the pelvis. Isolated transverse sacral fractures are even less frequent, and extensive neurologic deficits may accompany these injuries. This report describes an unusual case of extradural hemorrhage accompanying a complex fracture of the sacrum. The reversal of a serious neurologic deficit was notably aided by sacral laminectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/32. Fractures of the sacrum and sacroiliac joint: evaluation by computerized tomography with multiplanar reconstruction.

    Conventional roentgenographic views of the pelvis provide inadequate assessment of complex bony trauma. Computerized tomography (CT) allows simpler patient positioning, more reliable detection of subtle fractures, better characterization of complex fractures, and detection of associated soft tissue and joint space abnormalities. The addition of multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) provides a better understanding of the pathoanatomy. The sacrum and the sacroiliac joint, traditionally problematic to image, are particularly well defined by CT/MPR. Subtle diastasis and intra-articular fragments are more reliably detected when the transaxial image is supplemented by coronal reconstructions. The degree of comminution and direction of fragment displacement are also best defined by coronal and sagittal formatting. Surgeons often find this protocol useful in preoperative assessment of extent and stability of fractures, and in planning conservative or surgical management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/32. radiation induced fractures of sacrum: CT diagnosis.

    Sacral insufficiency fracture due to bone atrophy may develop as a complication of irradiation of pelvic malignancies. pain is the presenting symptom and the clinical diagnoses most often considered are recurrence of the original malignancy and metastatic disease. Computed tomography provides the most specific information helpful for the detection of these fractures and for exclusion of recurrent malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/32. Unilateral S-1 root compression syndrome caused by fracture of the sacrum.

    Unilateral S-1 nerve root compression after an S-1 sacral fracture was found in an 18-year-old man after a motor vehicle accident. The positive myelogram, myelogram-computed tomogram, and magnetic resonance studies led to surgical intervention. Marked bony callous formation contiguous with the S-1 alar fracture protruded into the canal and was responsible for tethering the S-1 nerve root. A right L-5 hemilaminectomy, an L-4, L-5 and L-5, S-1 medial facetectomy, and foraminotomy facilitated nerve root decompression. Postoperatively, the patient was markedly improved. The authors suggest a more aggressive attitude in the diagnostic, radiographic, and surgical management of sacral fractures now that more specific technical facilities are available to define the precise character of the lesions involved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/32. A new approach to upper cervical injuries.

    Severe injuries to the upper cervical region can be the cause of death. Standard autopsy techniques are inadequate for examination of this area. Therefore a technique has been developed that gives excellent visualization and allows removal of the brain and spinal cord in one piece. With the body prone a midline incision is made from the top of the head to the sacrum. The skull is sawed in a circle from one side of the foramen magnum around the top of the skull to the other side of the foramen magnum. The lamina of the neural arches of the vertebral column are sawed. With the removal of the piece of skull and the posterior portions of the neural arches, the posterior half of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and entire spinal cord are exposed. The entire brain and spinal cord can be removed as a unit. Cases are selected by history, X-ray examination, or floppy head. Four cases in which this approach has been helpful are briefly mentioned.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/32. Bone scanning in the detection of occult fractures.

    The potential role of bone scanning in the early detection of occult fractures following acute trauma was investigated. technetium 99m pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained in patients with major clinical findings (e.g., pain, swelling, tenderness) and negative or equivocal roentgenograms following trauma. Bone scanning facilitated the prompt diagnosis of occult fractures in the hip, knee, wrist, ribs and costochondral junctions, sternum, vertebrae, sacrum, and coccyx. Several illustrative cases are presented. Roentgenographic confirmation occurred following a delay of days to weeks and, in some instances, the roentgenographic findings were subtle and could be easily overlooked. This study demonstrates bone scanning to be invaluable and definitive in the prompt detection of occult fractures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/32. Displaced midline longitudinal fracture of the sacrum.

    An unstable displaced midline longitudinal (vertical) fracture of the sacrum, apparently not previously reported, is described. Pitfalls in treatment are elucidated. It is recommended that Pennal 's classification be used to categorize all pelvic fractures in order to ensure early and adequate treatment and minimize the occurrence of disabling sequelae. In the patient reported, complications were bladder prolapse, pelvic instability, and sciatic nerve injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Fractures, Bone'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.