Cases reported "Frontal Sinusitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. The endoscopic management of chronic frontal sinusitis associated with frontal sinus posterior table erosion.

    Expansile inflammatory diseases of the frontal sinuses may produce erosion of the posterior table of the frontal sinus. In these instances, the bone between sinus mucosa and intracranial dura is absent. Over the past decade, endoscopic frontal sinusotomy has emerged as the preferred technique for the treatment of refractory chronic frontal sinusitis. Endoscopic approaches also have a role in the most advanced instances of frontal sinusitis. A retrospective chart review of patients who were treated for frontal sinusitis with erosion of the frontal sinus posterior table was performed. Eight patients were identified. All patients underwent endoscopic frontal sinusotomy; some patients required multiple endoscopic procedures. Complete frontal recess dissection with identification of the frontal ostium was achieved for all involved frontal sinuses. In all cases, this postoperative result was monitored by CT scans (where indicated) and serial nasal endoscopy, which demonstrated good frontal sinus aeration and normal mucociliary clearance. Antibiotics were administered for culture-documented bacterial exacerbations, and systemic steroids were given for management of allergic fungal sinusitis and sinonasal polyposis associated with asthma. No patient underwent frontal sinus obliteration or cranialization. No suppurative intracranial complications were noted during the postoperative period. Endoscopic frontal sinusotomy can be used safely for the definitive management of frontal sinusitis associated with posterior table erosion. In fact, endoscopic techniques may represent the preferred approach for the treatment of this problem. Such an approach avoids the morbidity of more destructive alternatives (such as obliteration), and serves to create a frontal sinus with normal mucociliary clearance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. Intracranial complications of frontal sinusitis in children: Pott's puffy tumor revisited.

    The objective of the present study is to describe the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial complications of frontal sinusitis (Pott's puffy tumor) in a series of pediatric patients at our institution. A rare entity, Pott's puffy tumor has been reported in only 21 pediatric cases in the literature of the antibiotic era. The hospital records and radiographic files at Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital, Cleveland, ohio, USA, over the previous 16 years were retrospectively reviewed in a search for patients with the diagnosis of Pott's puffy tumor, defined as scalp swelling and associated intracranial infection. There were 6 male patients and 1 female patient. Ages ranged from 11 to 18 years (median 14.5 years). Intracranial infections consisted of epidural abscess in 5 patients, subdural empyema in 4 and brain abscess in 1. Intraoperative cultures grew anaerobic organisms in 1 patient, microaerophilic streptococcus in 5 patients, klebsiella species in 1 patient and streptococcus pneumoniae in another. All patients presented with frontal scalp swelling, and other common symptoms included headache, fever, nasal drainage and frontal sinus tenderness. Five patients were treated with antibiotics prior to their presentation. Four patients presented with neurologic decompensation characterized by varying degrees of hemiparesis, obtundation, pupillary dilatation or aphasia. All patients underwent craniotomy and evacuation of the intracranial infection. Even severely impaired patients demonstrated full neurologic recovery. Despite the widespread use of antibiotics, neurosurgical complications of sinusitis continue to occur. A high degree of suspicion, along with prompt neurosurgical intervention and the use of appropriate antibiotics, can result in favorable outcomes in even the sickest patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. Frontal sinus destruction from allergic eosinophilic fungal rhinosinusitis.

    Extensive fungal infections of the paranasal sinuses are most often associated with immunocompromised patients or poorly controlled diabetics. Seldom do young, otherwise healthy patients present with advanced disease destroying bone and compressing the dura and frontal lobe posteriorly. A case of eosinophilic fungal rhinosinusitis which grew Curvularia lunata in culture is reported. Bone destruction can be common as an expanding inflammatory mass pushes and weakens surrounding bone. The destruction of the frontal sinus with the compression of the dura into the anterior cranial fossa of a 26-year-old requires drainage, reconstruction, and medical management. Our experience with the disease and our approach is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Frontal Sinusitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.