Cases reported "Furcation Defects"

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1/6. Furcation involvement in posterior teeth.

    This article presents two cases in which different treatments were used for mandibular molars with furcation lesions. In the first case, a conventional amputation treatment of the distal root was performed to save the mesial root as a terminal tooth, which was used as a partial denture abutment. The second case describes a relatively new technique in which a root perforation was filled with graft material (synthetic bioglass) and covered with a resorbable membrane to treat an iatrogenic furcation lesion adjacent to the mesial root. Twelve months after surgery, periapical radiographs of both treated cases showed increased bone density. Follow-up in both cases--30 months in the first case and 12 months in the second--showed no pathological recurrence or clinical dysfunction. Root amputation may provide an alternative to extraction in periodontally involved molars. Synthetic bone replacement materials combined with guided tissue regeneration may also help to correct osseous defects incurred by recent furcation perforations with associated bone loss.
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2/6. Mandibular and maxillary furcation tunnel preparations--literature review and a case report.

    AIM: The objective of this literature review and subsequent case report is to discuss and illustrate the tunnel preparation procedure as a treatment alternative for furcation-involved molars. review OF THE literature: Furcation tunnel preparation, i.e., the creation of access for plaque control between periodontally diseased roots, has not been discussed in the literature as comprehensively as root resective therapy, though success rates appear to fall within the same range. A short root trunk and a wide furcation entrance diameter are prerequisites for the indication of the tunnel preparation procedure. Although accessory canals in the furcation area are frequent findings on extracted teeth, endodontic complications have not been reported to be major complications after tunnel preparation. Caries developed at tunneled teeth even under proper maintenance, but did not necessarily lead to the loss of an affected tooth. CASE REPORT: In the case presented to illustrate the indication for the tunnel preparation procedure, periodontal disease was almost entirely restricted to the furcation sites of molar teeth. Affected teeth were either extracted or left intact and subjected to tunneling procedures. Periodontal health could be established and maintained at both single and double tunnels over a period of 2 years of periodontal supportive therapy.
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3/6. Subgingival restorations with resin ionomer: a periodontal alternative.

    The successful use and placement of subgingival resin-ionomer restorations in both anterior root and molar furcation defects are demonstrated in this article. Sustained tissue health and minimal probing depths at the surgical site demonstrate clinical success. These case reports illustrate the continued success of alternative treatment procedures for restoring subgingival mechanical root or periodontal lesions.
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4/6. Combined periodontal-prosthodontic treatment of early-onset periodontitis--an alternative to implant therapy.

    A variety of treatment systems should be available for patients whose dentitions are seriously compromised so that they may select customized treatment modalities that satisfactorily restore occlusal function, consider systemic conditions, and lessen the surgical and financial burdens. These requirements become more demanding when clinicians are faced with advanced cases of rapidly progressive periodontitis. Therefore, it is critical to establish sophisticated multidisciplinary treatment modalities for the successful management of these compromised patients. Obviously, because of various limitations, implant therapy cannot be the only solution. This article reports on the successful long-term management of seriously compromised early-onset periodontitis by a combined periodontal-prosthetic treatment as an alternative to implant therapy.
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5/6. A multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of early-onset periodontitis: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment of early-onset forms of periodontitis (EOP) represent a major challenge to periodontists. In this case report, we describe a multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of a patient with severe generalized juvenile periodontitis (GJP). Our approach incorporates clinical laboratory evaluation with conventional concepts of periodontal pathogenesis and therapeutics to diagnose and effectively treat EOP. methods: The 17-year-old female patient presented with clinical and radiographic evidence of severe attachment loss. Microbiological testing showed the presence of known periodontal pathogens including actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, prevotella intermedia, and porphyromonas gingivalis. Routine immunological tests did not reveal any of the functional defects thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of EOP After initiation of therapy, which consisted of scaling and root planing, supplemented with administration of systemic antibiotics, a reduction in probing depth and gain in clinical attachment could be demonstrated. Microbiological testing was used to monitor the composition of the periodontal microbiota and to adjust antimicrobial therapy accordingly. RESULTS: Using a non-surgical approach to treatment, except for 2 root amputations performed without flap reflection, we have been able to stabilize this patient's periodontal condition over the course of a 2-year follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: This treatment strategy provides an efficacious alternative to more aggressive forms of therapy and should therefore be considered for the treatment of patients with severe EOP.
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6/6. Treatment of intrabony defects associated with interradicular root proximity/fusion in molar furcations.

    To treat furcation involvement is a crucial challenge to periodontists, not only because of the limitation in pocket reduction by osteoplasty and apically positioned flap, but also because of the unpredictability in regenerative approaches. Therefore, if the first molar is absent and the second molar has to be retained strategically for prosthetic reasons, very few alternatives besides nonsurgical/surgical debridement can be taken in treating the furcation of the second molar, where the interradicular root proximity and fusion frequently occur. On the other hand, root amputation/hemisection has long been considered a contraindication in treating furcations with two close roots; however, this impression is only empirical. A series of clinical cases involved in the treatment of intrabony defects associated with interradicular root proximity and fusion by root amputation/hemisection has been reported. Without any help of regenerative material, thorough root debridement and pocket reduction were attained. Based on these cases, we suggested that the cut surface created by odontoplasty during root amputation was compatible for periodontal healing and the extraction socket provided striking potential for defect repair. We re-examined the clinical feasibility and benefit of treating intrabony defects associated with interradicular root proximity and fusion in molar furcations by root amputation/hemisection, and suggested that its role should be favorably reconsidered on case basis. The short-term success in periodontal and prosthetic aspects needed to be further evaluated at long-term follow-up.
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