Cases reported "Fusobacterium Infections"

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11/33. Fusobacteriosis presenting as community acquired pneumonia.

    Fusobacterium species are anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli, which colonise the mucus membranes of man and animals and can cause a number of clinical manifestations including Lemierre's disease (postanginal septicaemia), abdominal infection and deep-seated abscesses. The incidence of fusobacterium infections appears to be increasing, and we present three cases of fusobacteriosis who presented with features of community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Cases were treated with benzyl penicillin and metronidazole, co-amoxiclav and metronidazole and amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Since some of the Fusobacterium species are resistant to penicillin and erythromycin, treatment with these antibiotics in cases of fusobacteriosis presenting as CAP may lead to treatment failure. A high index of clinical suspicion is required to recognise this rare cause of CAP.
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12/33. fusobacterium nucleatum bacteraemia with multiple liver abscesses in an hiv-I antibody positive man with IgG2 deficiency.

    liver abscess formation due to fusobacterium nucleatum is rare. We describe an hiv-I antibody positive man, with normal surrogate markers of cell-mediated immunity, who presented with F. nucleatum bacteraemia and liver abscess formation. He was found to have IgG2 subclass deficiency. This case illustrates the clinical importance of altered B-cell function in patients who are at an early stage of hiv disease.
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keywords = nucleatum
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13/33. Septic arthritis secondary to fusobacterium necrophorum in a 4-year-old girl: case report and review of the literature.

    We report an unusual case of septic arthritis in a 4-year-old child caused by fusobacterium necrophorum. In spite of aggressive parenteral antibiotic therapy with ampicillin-sulbactam after surgical drainage, disease recurred, requiring additional arthrotomies. The infection was eventually eradicated with parenteral meropenem and clindamycin, and additional surgical drainage.
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keywords = fusobacterium
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14/33. osteomyelitis of the pelvis due to fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Anaerobic pelvic osteomyelitis occurs rarely in children. A case of fusobacterium nucleatum osteomyelitis of the right ilium [correction of ileum] in a child without apparent risk factors is described. This case emphasizes the value of diagnostic aspirates. Therapy with a combination of intravenous and oral clindamycin led to successful resolution of the infection.
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ranking = 0.44258036542974
keywords = nucleatum
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15/33. Capnophilic and anaerobic bacteremia in neutropenic patients: an oral source.

    The currently accepted empiric antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections in neutropenic patients may not cover the possibility of capnophilic and anaerobic bacteremia. Many of these infections develop in patients with severe mucositis or periodontitis, and the type of organisms recovered also suggests an oral source of infection. We present two cases of bacteremia in neutropenic patients who had been empirically treated with ceftazidime and piperacillin plus amikacin. In the first case a beta-lactamase-producing strain of capnocytophaga ochracea was isolated; in the second case bacteremia was due to a mixture of leptotrichia buccalis and fusobacterium nucleatum. These observations emphasize the necessity for a reevaluation of the possible use of antimicrobial agents active against beta-lactamase-producing capnophilic organisms and anaerobic bacteria during empiric therapy in neutropenic patients with an oral source of infection.
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ranking = 0.088516073085949
keywords = nucleatum
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16/33. Mixed fusobacterium and actinomyces pulmonary infection. Case report.

    This is a report of a twelve-year-old black male who presents a history of left neck pain, left shoulder pain, weight loss and minimal fever. The admission diagnosis was a malignancy, supported by radiographic findings of consolidation of left lower and left upper lobes and periosteal new bone formation along the inferior aspects of the left second, third and fourth ribs. Open biopsy of the chest wall revealed a large abscess cavity. Subsequent cultures on anaerobic blood agar plates grew actinomyces and Fusobacterium. The patient was treated with penicillin and improved clinically. This case emphasizes the need to culture tissue specimens for a wide array of organisms, including those not commonly seen today. A high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of anaerobic infections. Mixed anaerobic infections, including actinomyces, although uncommon in children, should be considered in the etiology of an intrathoracic mass.
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17/33. Multiple fusobacterium nucleatum liver abscesses. association with a persistent abnormality in humoral immune function.

    A previously healthy 29-year-old man developed multiple hepatic abscesses secondary to fusobacterium nucleatum. No underlying local disease was found. The leading portal of entry for the bacterium may have been the oral cavity; 4 days before the onset of his illness he had had extensive dental work. Immunological evaluation during the illness and in late convalescence (16 weeks after onset) revealed a persistent B cell abnormality characterized by markedly depressed in vitro secretion of immunoglobulins in response to pokeweed mitogen; however, serum immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses were normal. Abnormal numbers of suppressor T cells (OKT8 ) and increased suppressor function were also present. Anaerobic pyogenic liver abscesses may occur in the absence of obvious underlying disease, but this case suggests that there may be an association with in vitro abnormalities of the immune system.
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ranking = 0.44258036542974
keywords = nucleatum
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18/33. Superinfected actinomycotic abscess of the liver.

    Isolated actinomycotic liver abscess is rare. We report a case with fulminant evolution, which was treated successfully with surgery and penicillin. In human actinomycosis, actinomyces israeli is the main infective agent. An abdominal localisation is uncommon, occurring in less than 25% of cases. Isolated liver lesions are extremely rare; their presence might be interpreted as the result of the hematogenous spread of a no longer present intestinal lesion. The evolution of actinomycosis is usually torpid. In the present case, mixed infection with fusobacterium nucleatum might explain the acute evolution.
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ranking = 0.088516073085949
keywords = nucleatum
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19/33. Fusobacterium: anaerobic occult amnionitis and premature labor.

    Fusobacterium species are well established pathogens. Before the advent of effective anaerobic antimicrobial therapy, they were associated with prolonged, often fatal courses. Previously, fusobacterium had not been identified as a common perinatal pathogen. Three cases of occult amnionitis due to Fusobacterium are presented. review of five series of occult amnionitis revealed 23 cases. In seven (30.4%), Fusobacterium was isolated. In 14 (60.8%), an anaerobic species was isolated. The average gestational age of patients from whom anaerobes were grown was 29.0 weeks. Of those that grew no anaerobes, the average gestational age was 32.3 weeks (P less than .05). The overall rate of maternal febrile morbidity was 35%. Fusobacterium accounted for 50% of the febrile cases while accounting for only 30.4% of the total cases.
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keywords = fusobacterium
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20/33. fusobacterium nucleatum pericarditis.

    A pericardial effusion was diagnosed by echocardiography in a 49 year old man who suffered acute cough, orthopnea, and chest pain. Because of a positive tuberculin skin test, mycobacteria were initially suspected as the cause of the pericarditis. The patient was therefore treated with antituberculosis drugs. The pericardial effusion failed to resolve, however, and pericardiectomy was performed. culture of the pericardial fluid yielded pure fusobacterium nucleatum growth. The patient responded to antibiotic therapy and was in good health 3 weeks after being discharged from the hospital. This represents the first report of F. nucleatum pericarditis.
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ranking = 0.53109643851569
keywords = nucleatum
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