Cases reported "Gangrene"

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1/36. Intensive tandem cryofiltration apheresis and hemodialysis to treat a patient with severe calciphylaxis, cryoglobulinemia, and end-stage renal disease.

    This is the first report on tandem cryofiltration apheresis (CFA) and hemodialysis (HD). A 44 year old white man with Type II mixed cryoglobulinemia, hepatitis c virus (HCV), severe skin lesions, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis was air-transferred for CFA, which is only available at our medical center. The patient failed to respond to high dose steroids, immunosuppression, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange for the treatment of his cryoglobulinemia, and he failed alpha-interferon therapy for his HCV. On arrival, he was also found to have severe calciphylaxis secondary to ESRD with generalized, painful skin ulceration, necrosis, and penile gangrene. To treat both conditions, intensive, tandem CFA/HD was initiated. He received extensive wound care and surgical debridement. To prevent pressure ulcers and worsening of skin lesions, he was placed on the FluidAir (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) controlled air bed. The patient received 18 tandem CFA/HD treatments, and four extra HD treatments in one month. sodium citrate was used as an anticoagulant for the CFA procedure. His plasma cryoglobulin (CG) level dropped from 6,157 to 420 microg/ml, and his calciphylaxis also improved. The CFA effectively removed 93% of CG, without significant removal of IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, and fibrinogen. No albumin or fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was required as replacement fluid for CFA. No citrate toxicity or evidence of complement activation with the cryofilter was observed. The entire CFA procedure time (3(1/2) hours) was considered. Intensive, tandem CFA/HD was performed in a critically ill patient with no apparent adverse consequences.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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2/36. Postoperative synergistic gangrene after spinal fusion.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case of synergistic necrotizing gangrenous fasciitis after spinal surgery is reported. OBJECTIVES: To describe this unusual complication, explain the rationale of treatment, and increase awareness of this serious postoperative complication. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Although several cases of postoperative synergistic necrotizing fasciitis have been reported, there are no previously reported cases of this condition after spinal surgery. methods: A rapidly progressive necrotizing spinal wound infection after fusion for degenerative disc disease was treated in a 39-year-old man. RESULTS: The infection was successfully treated with serial debridements, appropriate antibiotics, and hyperbaric wound oxygenation. CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest adherence to the fundamental principles of treatment including radical surgical debridement and appropriate antibiosis for necrotizing gangrene after spinal surgery. In evaluation of aggressive spinal wound infections, diagnosis of synergistic necrotizing fasciitis should be kept in mind. Although hyperbaric wound oxygenation was implemented as an adjunct and appeared to aid in controlling the infection, its effect on outcome is not clear.
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ranking = 24.718201780718
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/36. Use of procine zenografts in treatment of Fournier's gangrene.

    The use of procine xenografts as a biologic dressing has become increasingly popular, particularly in cases of extensive tissue loss, as in severe thermal injuries. It not only minimizes protein and fluid loss, acts as a barrier to infection, but also prevents conversion of second-degree burns through its ability to control existing infection. In this case, it was used successfully to treat Fournier's gangrene. We believe it significantly eased and shortened the patient's hospital stay and enabled us to apply autogenous split thickness skin grafts sooner than with conventional modes of wound care.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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4/36. Management of amputation-stump breakdown.

    Seven cases of above-knee amputation stump breakdown following surgery for arteriosclerosis obliterans were successfully treated with Travase ointment. (bacillus subtilis proteinase). rehabilitation was facilitated because secondary closure of the previously infected necrotic wounds could be more rapidly undertaken.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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5/36. Uraemic gangrene syndrome: is parathyroidectomy always necessary?

    This report presents a case of uraemic gangrene syndrome with multiple ulcerations and calcium (Ca) deposits in the vessel walls. High-dosage oral calcium carbonate (CaCO3) treatment alone resulted in rapid wound healing with decreased serum phosphorus (P), Ca x P product and parathormone and only slightly increased Ca levels. We suggest that this should be the first choice of treatment in such cases because positive clinical response can achieve symptom-free status for the patient until kidney transplantation, thus making parathyroidectomy unnecessary.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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6/36. HBO and gas gangrene. A case report.

    A 58-year old man, in a mediocre health condition, was admitted into Landspitallin Fossvogur, the University of Reykjavik City Hospital, iceland, because of fever, chills, local pain and swelling due to the presence of a big old wound in his left heel. The first clinical appearance showed a gas gangrene of the area. The patient immediately underwent a surgical debridement and a fasciotomy, and antibiotic intravenous therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) were started. During the treatment the patient suffered for a multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS), was admitted in ICU and survived. A total of 52 HBO sessions were performed and one month since the admission into the hospital the patient received a skin transplant. He achieved a complete restitutio ad integrum after 78 days of hospitalization. gas gangrene is a fulminating infection caused by the genus of Clostridia. If not treated, it leads to the death of the host. The actual treatment for gas gangrene includes surgery, antibiotics, general resuscitative measures and HBOT.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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7/36. False aneurysm of the peroneal artery: an unusual complication of femoro-peroneal bypass grafting.

    Non-traumatic false aneurysm formation involving the native crural vessels is rare. We present the case of a false aneurysm of the native peroneal artery, which complicated femoro-peroneal bypass grafting. It seemed most likely to be of an infective aetiology, arising as a consequence of contiguous methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus wound infection. This was previously unreported in the literature. Successful management was achieved by primary suture, local wound debridement, excision of the distal graft and replacement with an interposition vein graft through uninfected tissue planes.
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ranking = 12.359100890359
keywords = wound infection, wound
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8/36. fistula management following an appendicectomy: nursing challenges.

    Preservation of skin integrity, nutritional support and removal of odour are key features of fistula management. This case study describes the care of a patient with a fistula wound that discharged copious amounts of semi-solid faecal matter.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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9/36. abdominal wall sinus due to impacting gallstone during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an unusual complication.

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, perforation of the gallbladder can occurs in < or = 20% of cases, while gallstone spillage occurs in < or = 6% of cases. In most cases, there are no consequences. gallstones can be lost in the abdominal wall as well as the abdomen during extraction of the gallbladder. The fate of such lost gallstones, which can lead to the formation of an abscess, an abdominal wall mass, or a persistent sinus, has not been studied adequately. Herein we report the case of a persistent sinus of the abdominal wall after an emergent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an 82-year-old woman with gangrenous cholecystitis and perforation of the friable wall in association with an empyema of the gallbladder. The culture of the obtained pus was positive for escherichia coli. After a small leak of dirty fluid from the wound of the epigastric port site of 4 months' duration, surgical exploration under local anesthesia revealed that the sinus was caused by spilled gallstones impacting into the abdominal wall between the posterior sheath and left rectus abdominalis muscle. The removal of the stones resulted in complete healing. Long-term complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy involving the abdominal wall are rare but important possible consequences that could be avoided.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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10/36. amputation-sparing treatment by nature: "surgical" maggots revisited.

    Maggots were used as adjunct treatment for infected wounds that showed no response to the classical approach of wound debridement and antibiotic therapy. We summarize findings for 11 patients with necrotic wounds who received treatment with "surgical" maggots (100-2900 applied in 3-10 changes of dressing) for 11-34 days, which apparently aided in tissue remodeling and cure, and describe 2 typical patients in detail.
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ranking = 3
keywords = wound
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