Cases reported "Gastritis"

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1/13. Chronic gastritis and helicobacter pylori.

    helicobacter pylori is the major cause of chronic gastritis. The predominant anatomic distribution of the gastritis is antral in the majority of individuals. In a small minority, the corpus is predominantly involved. The former pattern is associated with duodenal ulceration in some patients, but the majority of those infected never develop either symptoms or disease. The latter form is associated with the development of gastric ulcer and carcinoma and may be protective against the development of Barrett's esophagus. It is the physiological changes associated with the histological changes and the, as yet poorly, defined host response, which are of paramount importance in determining the evolution of a disease or whether the infected individual remains asymptomatic and disease free. This article addresses the various relationships between H. pylori infection, histology, gastric physiology, and disease.
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2/13. A case of primary esophageal B-cell lymphoma of MALT type, presenting as a submucosal tumor.

    The primary esophageal lymphoma is extremely rare, and shows various morphologic characteristics. Only a single case of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type lymphoma confined to the esophagus has been reported in the literature. A 61-yr-old man was referred to our hospital for evaluation of an esophageal submucosal tumor (SMT) that had been detected incidentally by endoscopy. He had a history of pulmonary tuberculosis with long-term anti-tuberculosis medication 15 yr before, and also had a history of syphilis, which had been treated one year before. He had been taking a synthetic thyroid hormones for the past 10 months because of an autoimmune thyroiditis. endoscopy showed a longitudinal round and tubular shaped smooth elevated lesion, which was covered with intact mucosa and located at the mid to distal esophagus, 31 cm to 39 cm from the incisor teeth. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed a huge longitudinal growing intermediate- to hypo-echoic mass located in the submucosal layer with internal small, various sized honeycomb-like anechoic lesions suggesting germinal centers. Subsequently, he underwent a surgery, which confirmed the mass as a primary esophageal low-grade B-cell lymphoma of MALT type.
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3/13. Collagenous gastritis in a Korean child: a case report.

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is an extremely rare disorder. The first case of collagenous gastritis in a Korean boy in his pre-teens who had been receiving treatment for refractory iron deficiency anemia has been reported. The patient had been suffering from intermittent abdominal pain, recurrent blood-tinged vomiting and poor oral intake. The gastric endoscopy revealed diffuse cobblestone appearance of the mucosa with easy touch bleeding throughout the stomach but no abnormalities in the esophagus, duodenum, and colon. Pathologic examination of the gastric biopsies from the antrum, body and cardia showed a subepithelial collagen deposition with entrapped dilated capillaries, moderate infiltrates of lympho-plasma cells and eosinophils of the lamina propria, and marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosa. The collagen deposition appeared as discontinuous bands with focally irregular extension into the deeper part of the antral mucosa. It measured up to 150 microm. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected. The biopsies from the duodenum, esophagus and colon revealed no pathologic abnormalities.
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4/13. Corrosive gastritis mimicking linitis plastica carcinoma.

    A 59-year-old female with depressive tendencies was admitted suffering from hematemesis and abdominal pain, two hours after ingestion of an unknown amount of toilet bowl cleaner (hydrochloric acid, pH 1.0). A barium study 24 days after ingestion revealed rigid narrowing and granulation of the entire stomach. The esophagus and duodenum were normal. The radiographic results were similar to those obtained for linitis plastica carcinoma of the stomach, but biopsy specimens of the stomach revealed no cancer cells. A total gastrectomy was performed about two months after ingestion to relieve the persistent feeling of nausea. Specimens revealed a rigid and thickening lining and a denuded mucosal surface of the stomach. The cut surface of the specimen showed a remarkable fibrous thickening of the submucosal layer. Microscopic examination failed to reveal a normal mucosal layer except in a narrow area of the fornix, and remarkable fibrosis of the submucosal lining was noted. No cancer cells were found. Corrosive gastritis has a linitis plastica appearance with a predilection for the antrum. Radiological examination revealed the very rare manifestation of a rigid narrowing of the whole stomach mimicking linitis plastica type cancer.
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5/13. Menetrier's disease. A trivalent gastropathy.

    Current conceptions of Menetrier's disease only obliquely resemble those originally described. Bona-fide cases are so uncommon that, of 125 cases diagnosed as Menetier's disease, hypertrophic gastritis, or protein-losing gastropathy treated at the massachusetts General Hospital during the 26-year period of 1962-1987, only six cases merited an unequivocal anatomic diagnosis. Two other cases previously described proved on review to be nondiagnostic in one instance and campylobacter pylori gastritis in the other. Because abnormalities in the secretion of gastric acid and in the loss of protein from the stomach may coexist, a representation of each case in semiquantitative terms can be described on triaxial coordinates. Three patients had a hypercoagulable state, one in association with gastric carcinoma. One other case of gastric carcinoma and one of esophageal carcinoma coexistant with Menetrier's disease were identified. Administration of subcutaneous heparin during the perioperative period to patients with Menetrier's disease is appropriate regardless of whether or not hypercoagulation or carcinoma is manifest. If treatment with anticholinergic drugs and inhibitors of gastric acid secretion fails, total gastrectomy is the best solution, because it stops protein loss, eliminates hyperchlorhydria, prevents development of gastric carcinoma, and permits anastomotic reconstruction between normal esophagus and normal small bowel.
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6/13. Primary tuberculous granulomatous esophagogastro-duodenitis: a report of a case.

    Primary upper gastro-intestinal tuberculosis is a very rare disease. We report the case of a 25-year-old man who presented with a febrile illness and non-specific gastro-intestinal symptoms. The upper gastro-intestinal x-rays showed a normal esophagus and non-specific changes of the stomach and duodenum. endoscopy revealed diffuse esophagogastro-duodenitis of tuberculous origin. The patient recovered completely after treatment.
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7/13. Gastric candidiasis.

    A male, aged 60 with rheumatoid arthritis which was treated with prednisone, developed a severe symptomatic stomal gastritis at the site of a previous Polya partial gastrectomy. The endoscopic appearance of the lesion was similar to that of Candida infection, which is more frequently seen in the oesophagus. candida albicans was cultured from biopsy specimens, and prompt resolution of the lesion and the patient's symptoms occurred with orally administered antifungal therapy. Primary gastric candidiasis should be considered in compromised patients with symptoms of infection of the upper part of gastrointestinal tract.
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8/13. Acid corrosive gastritis. A plea for delayed surgical approach.

    Acid corrosive gastritis is infrequently seen. It spares the esophagus and damages the antrum. It causes mucosal ulceration, damages the muscularis and ends in a typical antral stricture. The dynamic perpetuating pathophysiologic events, starting with coagulation necrosis, impose postponement of surgical intervention. Two cases of second degree acid corrosive gastritis are presented. Surgery was performed in both patients, only after dysphagia and vomiting became intractable.
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9/13. Esophageal candidiasis following omeprazole therapy: a report of two cases.

    Esophageal candidiasis was diagnosed at endoscopy in two patients receiving omeprazole therapy. There was no clinical evidence of immunosuppression or any obstructive lesion in the esophagus. There was prompt response of oral ketoconazole. These cases suggest that marked acid reduction may predispose to esophageal candidial infection.
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10/13. A fatal case of emphysematous gastritis and esophagitis.

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of infectious gastritis characterized by intramural gas production by gas forming organisms. We report a fatal case of this disorder with involvement of both stomach and esophagus in a 76 yr old man who had a past history of alcohol abuse, and whose recent therapy included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.
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