Cases reported "Gastroesophageal Reflux"

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1/7. Fixed drug eruption in hands caused by omeprazole.

    OBJECTIVE: omeprazole is one of the most widely prescribed gastric antisecretory drugs. It is generally well tolerated and significant adverse reactions occur rarely. The objective of this report is to describe a case of fixed drug eruption that occurred during omeprazole treatment. CASE REPORT: A 37-year-old white female patient admitted with epigastric pain and heartburn symptoms. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed reflux esophagitis and the patient was given 20 mg b.i.d. omeprazole. She developed dark-red coloration on her hands, at the fourth day of treatment, which has been defined as fixed drug eruption. These lesions were attributed to treatment and recurred soon after a rechallenge with omeprazole. CONCLUSION: Fixed drug eruption is associated with many drugs but this is the first such report with omeprazole. We suggest being aware of such reactions during omeprazole usage.
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2/7. Diagnosis and dental treatment of a young adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux: a case report with 2-year follow-up.

    A young adult who complained of extreme dentin sensitivity to tactile and thermal stimuli exhibited severe, generalized tooth erosion and an associated parafunctional habit. The diagnosis of the underlying general disease and treatment of its dental sequelae are presented, together with a 2-year follow up. patients who are suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux should be referred to a gastroenterologist or other health professionals to ensure early diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, thus minimizing the destruction of the patient's dentition and improving the patient's general health. Dental treatment should be adjusted to fit the characteristics of each case.
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ranking = 1.5132185296648
keywords = tooth
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3/7. Case report: management of tooth tissue loss from intrinsic acid erosion.

    Acid erosive tooth wear is increasingly being reported in many western countries, and is also being recognised as a significant cause of tooth destruction in persons with xerostomia. The primary aetiology is related to a high consumption of dietary sources of acids and also to an increasing awareness of gastric acid as a significant factor in both children and adults. Recommended preventive dental treatments aim to neutralise the effects of acids, reduce the severity of xerostomia, stimulate salivary flow and buffering capacity, and increase the acid resistance of tooth substance. Initial restorative treatments should be conservative, using adhesive dentistry techniques. This treatment approach is illustrated by the oral rehabilitation of a severe erosion case using adhesive onlays, veneers and all ceramic crowns.
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ranking = 10.592529707654
keywords = tooth
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4/7. gastroesophageal reflux disease, tooth erosion, and prosthodontic rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a relatively common gastrointestinal disorder in the united states. The reflux of acid adversely affects the mucosal lining of the esophagus and is responsible for dental erosion. This article briefly reviews the etiology, risk factors, and medical management of GERD. The patient presentation describes the rehabilitation of a young adult with GERD who needed multidisciplinary care.
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ranking = 6.0528741186592
keywords = tooth
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5/7. Restoring erosion associated with gastroesophageal reflux using direct resins: case report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where stomach acids are chronically regurgitated into the esophagus and oral cavity, resulting in pathology, such as esophagitis, varices or ulcers. Continual exposure of the teeth to these acids can also cause severe dental erosion. This condition frequently is asymptomatic, and the only evident sign may be the irreversible erosion of tooth structure. The dentist often is the first health care professional to identify the affected dentition. knowledge of this cause and effect relationship between GERD and dental erosion will better prepare the practitioner to refer patients for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying medical condition and provide treatment for the affected teeth. This article presents a case report where dental erosion was present due to GERD. After management of the disease with medication, dental treatment of the eroded dentition is described, including diagnosis, treatment planning and restorative reconstruction.
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ranking = 1.5132185296648
keywords = tooth
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6/7. Dental erosion in children.

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. The overlapping of erosion with mechanical forces like attrition or abrasion is probably in deciduous teeth more pronounced than in permanent teeth. Early erosive damage to the permanent teeth may compromise the dentition for the entire lifetime and require extensive restorative procedures. Therefore, early diagnosis of the condition and adequate preventive measures are of importance. knowledge of the etiological factors for erosive tooth wear is a prerequisite for such measures. In children and adolescents (like in adults) extrinsic and intrinsic factors or a combination of them are possible reasons for the condition. Such factors are frequent and extensive consumption of erosive foodstuffs and drinks, the intake of medicaments (asthma), gastro-esophageal reflux (a case history is discussed) or vomiting. But also behavioral factors like unusual eating and drinking habits, the consumption of designer drugs and socio-economic aspects are of importance.
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ranking = 3.0264370593296
keywords = tooth
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7/7. Loss of tooth structure associated with chronic regurgitation and vomiting.

    In summary, a teenaged patient had generalized loss of tooth structure. As the patient previously had a normal dental history and as his family history was negative, many causative factors were quickly ruled out. Finally, after obtaining full cooperation of the patient and reviewing the complete medical records, it was concluded that the loss of tooth structure resulted from demineralization by acidic gastric contents, due to chronic regurgitation and vomiting.
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ranking = 9.0793111779888
keywords = tooth
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