Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/21. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization.

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/21. endoscopy as a tool for diagnosing and treating gastrointestinal angiodysplasia in haemodialysis patients.

    Gastroenteric angiodysplasia is an important cause of haemorrhage in chronic renal failure patients. This paper reports on 2 patients on maintenance haemodialysis with upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to different manifestations of angiodysplasic lesions (sudden appearance of haematemesis and melaena in one case, progressive anaemia with apparent resistance to erythropoietin in the other case). Exploratory endoscope examination of the first digestive tract showed in both cases the presence of bleeding angiodysplasic lesions. Both patients were there and then submitted to surgical endoscopy, during which the bleeding angiodysplasic lesion was sclerosed with physiological salt solution plus adrenaline 1/10000 and 1% polydocanol. In one patient, bleeding occurred again ten days later, making renewed surgical endoscopy necessary. In the course of this an elastic ligature was made to the superangular angiodysplasia. A year later in both cases there were no direct or indirect signs of further bleeding; an endoscopic check-up showed the treated lesions to be sclerosed. endoscopy offers the unique possibility of being used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in a single session. In expert hands, endoscope therapy is effective and markedly reduces the risk of side effects.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/21. subclavian artery aneurysm with oesophagoarterial fistula.

    Aneurysms of the subclavian artery are rare. Fistula formation between the subclavian artery and the oesophagus has been described in aberrant subclavian artery and oesophageal foreign body. However, a fistula between a non-aberrant subclavian artery aneurysm and the oesophagus has not been previously reported. In this report, an unusual case of subclavian artery aneurysm with a fistula to the oesophagus causing intractable haematemesis is presented with the angiographic findings.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/21. Cholecystogastric fistula presenting with haematemesis: diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.

    The case is reported of a 72-year-old woman suffering from morbid obesity, who presented with haematemesis while on anti-coagulant therapy. The source of the bleeding proved to be the gastric exit of a cholecystogastric fistula. Subsequent cholangitis was successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) while simultaneously the extent of the fistula was established. cholecystectomy and closure of the fistula was contraindicated because of her morbid obesity. She remained well for 6 months but then presented with a gallstone ileus while another stone was found to be escaping from the gastric fistula. Her morbid obesity resulted in surgical procrastination, which eventually proved fatal. This patient experienced both of the most common types of complication in cholecysto-enteral fistulation, cholangitis and gallstone ileus. Although cholecysto-enteral fistulas (CEF) are probably less common than several decades ago, they are now most likely to be diagnosed during ERC. Gastroenterologists therefore need to be aware of their potential to contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of this surgical condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/21. Gastroduodenal artery stump haemorrhage following pylorus-sparing Whipple procedure: treatment with covered stents.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To report a case of bleeding after pancreatoduodenectomy in a patient with pancreatic leak and portal thrombosis who was successfully treated with an endovascular approach. methods: A 58-year-old male, suffering from neoplasm of the distal bile duct, underwent a pylorus-preserving Whipple procedure. On the 18th day, following a sudden drop in pressure and low haematocrit values, the patient underwent surgery. The source of the bleeding was not found. Six days later, following the appearance of bleeding from the abdominal drainage and haematemesis with shock, the patient had an immediate angiography. Bleeding from the gastroduodenal artery stump was evident, the portography showed no portal flow. With respect to the shortness of the stump, safe embolisation with coils, while preserving the common hepatic artery patency, was difficult to obtain. RESULTS: By transcatheter placement of covered stents into the hepatic artery and thereby occluding the origin of the gastroduodenal artery, the bleeding was stopped. After 2 months, CT angiography showed patency of both the common and proper hepatic arteries. Nine months after the procedure the patient is in good health. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous placement of covered stents can be the solution in cases where transcatheter embolisation is not recommendable because of portal vein thrombosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/21. Fatal haematemesis due to benign retrosternal goitre.

    The development of a goitre in the retrosternal space may result in many different symptoms due to local compression. We describe a case in which such a goitre resulted in full-thickness ulceration of the oesophagus, which presented as a fatal haematemesis. We believe that such a complication has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/21. Massive upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a young man: a case of Dieulafoy's syndrome.

    A 23-year-old man was admitted following a massive haematemesis. Dieulafoy's syndrome was diagnosed and the treatment was a partial proximal gastrectomy and pyloroplasty. The diagnosis and approach to surgical management of Dieulafoy's syndrome are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/21. Coeliac axis ligation in a case of unmanageable upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGH) is a frequent reason for referral in gastroenterologic practice. It consists of bleeding that originates in the upper gastrointestinal tract, between the oesophagus and Treitz's angle. Gastroduodenal peptic ulceration, severe lesions of gastric or duodenal mucosa, and esophageal varicose rupture are the most frequently reported causes of UGH. Clinically, it manifests as rectal bleeding or haematemesis. Regardless of the causal lesion, UGH is differentiated by the degree of haemodynamic instability. Thus, initial management of UGH with haemodynamic instability does not depend on the lesion that produces it but rather on controlling the hypovolaemia in all cases. Subsequent therapeutic measures, which in certain cases are defined in early stages of this picture, depend on the aetiology of the lesion causing the UGH and its treatment. We present a case of unmanageable UGH of unknown aetiology despite multiple diagnostic and therapeutic measures, where final successful treatment required an exceptional surgical intervention--celiac axis ligation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/21. Gastric epithelioid haemangioendothelioma: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Vascular tumours of the stomach are rare, representing 0.9%-3.3% of all gastric neoplasms. A 58 year old man was admitted as an emergency with a one day history of haematemesis and melaena. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for a tumour in the lesser curve of the stomach. The tumour showed the characteristic histological and immunohistochemical features of epithelioid haemangioendothelioma. Surgery in the form of wide excision seems to be the treatment of choice for this rare neoplasm. This case highlights the difficulty in diagnosing this rare tumour preoperatively and emphasises the need for long term follow up in view of its uncertain metastatic potential.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/21. angiodysplasia of cardia of stomach--a case report.

    angiodysplasia of gastrointestinal tract is still thought to be an entity of unknown aetiology. This lesion is most commonly observed in elderly patients presenting with severe and persistent iron deficiency anaemia, following occult blood loss or acute episodes of haematemesis. In the stomach antral vascular ectasia is the most common presentation. We report an autopsy case of vascular ectasia in the cardia of stomach in a young patient with clinical symptoms of anaemia as the presentation and an associated secondary hemosiderosis of liver.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.