Cases reported "Giant Cell Tumors"

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11/256. Giant cell tumour of the hamate. Case report.

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman who had had the distal end of the ulna resected for a giant cell tumour five years before presenting with a further one in the hamate. The medullary cavity of the hamate was curetted and cancellous bone grafted from the distal radius. Her symptoms resolved, and 26 months postoperatively the cortex of the hamate was fully restored.
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12/256. Giant cell tumour of soft tissue--a case report.

    Giant cell tumor is seen in late adolescence or in the third or fourth decade of life. It arises from epiphysis of long bones, the commonest site being the distal end of the demur and the proximal end of tibia. This paper presents a case report of giant cell tumor of soft tissue.
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13/256. Giant cell tumour of soft tissue--a case report.

    Giant cell tumor is seen in late adolescence or in the third or fourth decade of life. It arises from epiphysis of long bones, the commonest site being the distal end of the femur and the proximal end of tibia. This paper presents a case report of giant cell tumor of soft tissue.
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14/256. Malignant giant-cell tumor of the parietal bone: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Giant-cell tumors (GCTs) are primary bone tumors that involve long bones in 75 to 90% of patients. They seldom develop in the cranium and are very rare in patients older than 60 years of age. A GCT rarely occurs with Paget's disease; when it does, however, it is most commonly associated with the polyostotic form and tends to involve the craniofacial bones. Pagetic GCTs are less aggressive than GCTs that are not associated with Paget's disease. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We report the case of an 81-year-old woman with a painless left parietal mass and asymptomatic monostotic parietal Paget's disease. INTERVENTION: Surgical resection was performed, and histological examination of the lesion demonstrated Paget's disease with a malignant GCT. An incidental, low-grade, small-cell lymphocytic lymphoma also was noted. The patient experienced local recurrence of the malignant GCT and eventually died after developing pulmonary metastases of the malignant GCT. CONCLUSION: This case is the first reported example of a patient with a malignant GCT of the cranium associated with monostotic Paget's disease. It provides evidence that not all pagetic GCTs in the cranium are benign, as has been reported.
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15/256. Radiosensitive giant cell tumour of the sphenoid bone.

    Giant cell tumours rarely occur in the cranial region. We encountered a radiosensitive giant cell tumour of the sphenoid in a 12-year-old girl. After a two-stage operation, the residual tumour regrew rapidly. The adjuvant radiotherapy subsequent to additional surgery has suppressed the growth of the residual tumour for 5 years.
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16/256. Ceramic endoprosthesis for aggressive giant cell tumors near the knee: eight cases followed for more than 10 years.

    Eight patients with locally aggressive giant cell tumor were treated with marginal resection and implantation of a ceramic endoprosthesis with a non-hinged knee joint. The patients have been followed-up for between 10 to 16 years. Newly formed bone appeared at the junction between implant and cortex and in 2 cases subsidence of the implant was seen. All the patients had good function of the knee and no revision was needed.
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17/256. Ovarian giant cell tumor with cystadenocarcinoma.

    A 25-year-old woman had a malignant ovarian tumor with two distinct tumor patterns: pseudomucinous cystadenocarcinoma and malignant giant cell tumor of bone. One area of the tumor had a lining of tall columnar epithelium with abundant mucin production; however, another area of the same tumor had a number of large multinucleated giant cells that resembled osteoclasts, intermingled with mononuclear stromal cells. There was no blending of the two tumor patterns. Mitoses were frequent in both areas. A probable histogenesis of the tumor from a malignant teratoma is suggested.
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18/256. An unusual cause for tinnitus.

    Central giant cell granulomas of the skull base are uncommon entities. They usually present at the epiphyses of long bones such as the proximal femur and distal radius. Otological symptoms are not known as a common presenting symptom of giant cell granulomas.
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19/256. Secondary malignant giant-cell tumour of bone: molecular abnormalities of p53 and H-ras gene correlated with malignant transformation.

    AIMS: We report two cases of secondary malignant giant-cell tumour occurring without irradiation therapy. To elucidate the mechanism of malignant transformation in this tumour, we searched for the molecular abnormalities of p53, MDM2 and the H-ras genes. methods AND RESULTS: These cases were retrieved after a review of 103 cases of primary giant-cell tumour of bone, registered in our institute. One case occurred in the distal femur of a 42-year-old female after surgical curettage, while the other arose in the acetabulum of a 25-year-old male after en bloc resection. Microscopically, the malignant tumour in the distal femur was composed of a proliferation of ovoid or fusiform cells arranged in fascicles with high mitotic activities. The malignant transformed tumour in the acetabulum was made up of pleomorphic tumour cells with atypical mitoses. In the tumour of the distal femur, both p53 and H-ras mutations were detected. Abnormal nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and c-myc expression were also revealed by immunohistochemistry. In both cases, the recurrent malignant tumour over-expressed MMP-9 and revealed a higher MIB-1-labelling index compared with the primary conventional giant-cell tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that multiple oncogene or tumour suppressor gene mutations may play an important role during malignant transformation in conventional giant-cell tumours.
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20/256. Giant cell tumor of the rib.

    In a rare case of a giant cell tumor of rib origin, a 25-year-old woman to be evaluated for an abnormal mass shadow in chest radiography was strongly positive in a tuberculin skin test, but showed no evidence of active tuberculosis. Chest computed tomography showed a heterogeneous mass originating in the posterior end of the right fourth rib and containing multiple calcifications and cystic lesions. magnetic resonance imaging showed a high signal intensity with low signal intensity areas. Bone scintigraphy showed an abnormal marked accumulation at the tumor site. A thoracoscopic examination was conducted prior to complete tumor resection, including the fourth rib and related muscles. The pathological diagnosis returned was a giant cell tumor of the bone. The patient did not undergo chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and remains well, and tumor-free at 6 months after surgery.
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