Cases reported "Gingival Hemorrhage"

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1/73. Effective periodontal treatment in a patient with type IIA von Willebrand's disease: report of a case.

    von Willebrand's disease (vWD) is one of the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders. A mild to moderate deficiency of factor viii and von willebrand factor (vWf) often is associated with gingival bleeding. In this case report, the periodontal treatment of a patient with vWD is described. A 45-year-old woman with type IIA vWD was referred for periodontal therapy because of an episode of gingival hemorrhage and percussion pain of teeth #18 and #47. The periodontal findings included probing depths ranging from 2 to 6 mm, horizontal bone loss, and Class II furcation involvement of tooth #46. After consultation with a hematologist, apically positioned flap surgery and hemisection were performed on tooth #46 following completion of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and endodontic therapy. The patient was given 500 units of factor viii including vWf multimer 30 minutes before surgery. After healing of the periodontal tissue, prosthodontic treatment was undertaken on the posterior mandibular sextants. At follow-up, the probing depths ranged from 2 to 3 mm, and gingival bleeding on probing was minimal. The patient's children all had vWD. They had mild to moderate periodontitis with probing depths ranging from 2 to 5 mm and gingival bleeding on probing. With the combined efforts of the periodontist and hematologist, effective periodontal treatment can be provided to patients with von Willebrand's disease.
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2/73. gingival hemorrhage, myelodysplastic syndromes, and acute myeloid leukemia. A case report.

    Myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) presenting as spontaneous gingival hemorrhage is described. gingival hemorrhage is recognized as a symptom of MDS, a rare group of potentially fatal hematological disorders, but it has not previously been documented as a presenting sign. The diagnostic pitfalls are discussed with the case, and the need for careful interpretation of laboratory findings in conjunction with clinical signs is emphasized. Finally, the MDSs are defined, classified and discussed with respect to their relevance to the clinical periodontist, from a diagnostic, therapeutic, and management standpoint.
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3/73. Gingival telangiectases: an underappreciated physical sign of juvenile dermatomyositis.

    BACKGROUND: medline searches (1966-June 1969) failed to identify references that give detailed descriptions of the oral manifestations of dermatomyositis (DM). However, several reports predating medline provided more complete descriptions of oral lesions associated with DM. OBSERVATIONS: We describe 5 cases of juvenile DM with oral manifestations, primarily in the form of gingival telangiectases. These findings are compared with those descriptions found in earlier reports. CONCLUSIONS: Oral lesions in juvenile DM have rarely been reported. mucous membrane involvement associated with DM may include telangiectases, edema, erosions, ulcers, and leukoplakia-like areas. In cases of DM, gingival telangiectases likely represent an underappreciated diagnostic finding analogous to nail-fold telangiectases.
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4/73. Sequelae of dental extraction during quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

    The pathogenesis and treatment of quinine-induced thrombocytopenia is discussed. The case presented involved the sequelae of a dental extraction performed during an episode of acute thrombocytopenia. A complete medical history and knowledge of current medications and their possible side effects are of paramount importance before any patient is treated.
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ranking = 0.0045546597053559
keywords = dental
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5/73. Spontaneous gingival bleeding in an otherwise asymptomatic patient.

    This case is presented to challenge the reader to formulate a differential diagnosis for a patient who visits the dentist with spontaneous, continuous gingival bleeding. When this situation occurs, it is serious and requires immediate attention and a specific treatment plan to arrive at the underlying diagnosis and control the bleeding. The signs and symptoms of a patient with gingival bleeding are presented for diagnosis; the history and management are detailed, and may be useful in diagnosing and treating similar patients.
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6/73. A bleeding tendency as the first symptom of a choledochal cyst.

    We report an 8-month-old male presenting with gingival hemorrhages and nasal bleeding as the first symptom of a choledochal cyst (CC). On physical examination, there was a large cystic mass in the right upper abdominal quadrant. Laboratory studies on admission revealed moderate liver dysfunction and a bleeding tendency due to vitamin k deficiency. After administration of 5 mg vitamin K the bleeding tendency disappeared. At laparotomy, a large CC 5 cm in diameter was found and the liver showed moderate cholestasis. The sudden onset of a bleeding tendency in infants with congenital liver or biliary-tract disease may suggest not only biliary atresia, but also CC.
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7/73. cyclosporine A-induced gingival hyperplasia pemphigus vulgaris: literature review and report of a case.

    gingival hyperplasia appears in 8% to 85% of patients treated with cyclosporine. Most studies show an association between oral hygiene status and the prevalence and severity of this gingival overgrowth. Thus, besides attempting to substitute this drug with another whenever possible, treatment usually involves maintenance of strict oral hygiene coupled with scaling and root planing and removal of iatrogenic factors. Sometimes a second treatment phase involving periodontal surgery is necessary. cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth has been mainly described in post-organ transplant patients. The present case describes, for the first time, a severe form of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth arising in a 15 year-old male with pemphigus vulgaris. Periodontal treatment included oral hygiene and scaling and root planing under local anesthesia. There was a significant reduction in gingival enlargement, as well as a reduction in plaque levels and inflammation. Cessation of drug administration, combined with continuous periodontal treatment, brought further improvement. This successful conservative treatment of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth in a pemphigus vulgaris patient suggests that early diagnosis and comprehensive treatment of these lesions may yield good response and reduce the need for periodontal surgery.
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8/73. Chorioepithelioma presenting as a bleeding gingival mass.

    A case is reported in which a very malignant neoplasm appeared clinically to be a pregnancy tumor or a hemangioma. There was, of course, no question as to the cause of death in this particular case. It was of interest because of the rarity of the tumor, the metastasis to the oral cavity, and the fact that the final diagnosis was established from pathologic examination. The case demonstrates, with emphasis, the great importance of biopsy and routine pathologic examination of all tissue for accurate and correct diagnosis, regardless of its clinical appearance.
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9/73. A new concept in the control of acute gingival hemorrhage.

    The topical application of epsilon-aminocaproic acid may be life-saving therapy for control of acute gingival hemorrhage in patients who are debilitated because of systemic diseases. When low doses were used, there have been no reports of adverse reactions.
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keywords = gingival
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10/73. Implant site development using orthodontic extrusion: a case report.

    One of the most important factors in the successful placement of endosseous implants is the presence of adequate alveolar bone at the recipient site. alveolar bone loss associated with destructive periodontal disease frequently results in osseous defects that may complicate subsequent implant placement. Typically, such defects are treated prior to or at the time of implant surgery using the principles of guided bone regeneration. Under certain circumstances, however, such defects may be managed non-surgically by orthodontic extrusion. orthodontic extrusion can be used to increase the vertical bone height and volume and to establish a more favourable soft-tissue profile prior to implant placement. The addition, the increase in the vertical osseous dimension at interproximal sites may assist in the preservation of the interdental papillae and can further enhance gingival aesthetics. This report illustrates the treatment sequence for site development with orthodontic extrusion prior to immediate implant placement.
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keywords = gingival, dental
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