Cases reported "Gingival Hyperplasia"

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1/18. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency in a child with severe oral involvement.

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare inherited defect of phagocytic function resulting from a lack of leukocyte cell surface expression of beta2 integrin molecules (CD11 and CD18) that are essential for leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and chemotaxis. A small number of patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 have a milder defect, with residual expression of CD18. These patients tend to survive beyond infancy; they manifest progressive severe periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket formation, and partial or total premature loss of the primary and permanent dentitions. We report on a 13-year-old boy with moderate leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 and severe prepubertal periodontitis. This case illustrates the need for the dentist to work closely with the pediatrician in the prevention of premature tooth loss and control of oral infection in these patients.
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2/18. oral manifestations of Schimmelpenning syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    Schimmelpenning syndrome (SS) is characterised by specific skin manifestations, skeletal defects, and central nervous system abnormalities. Here, the SS is briefly reviewed, and the oral and dental manifestations are described in a patient whose medical findings were previously published and included severe hypophosphatemic rickets. Significant oral and dental features included papillomatous lesions of the gingiva, hemihyperplasia (hemihypertrophy) of the tongue, bone cysts, aplasia of teeth, enlarged pulp chambers, hypoplastic or absent enamel, and an odontodysplasia-like permanent tooth.
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3/18. Diffuse but unilateral gingival enlargement associated with von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: An 8-year old girl was referred for diagnosis and treatment to the Department of Periodontology Oral Surgery of the University Hospital of Liege with an unusual clinical situation: a major, non-inflammatory, diffuse but unilateral enlargement of the interproximal, marginal and attached gingiva around all teeth of the right side of both the upper maxilla and mandible, whereas the alveolar process of the left side of upper and lower arches appeared strictly normal. METHOD: The clinical examination showed delayed eruption of some permanent teeth in the 1st and 4th quadrants. Except for its asymmetric occurrence, this gingival enlargement strongly resembled phenytoin-induced enlargement or gingival fibromatosis. This unilateral expression was evocative of a vascular or neurologic pathology. Several large "cafe-au-lait" spots were found disseminated on the body. Several selective surgical removals of thick gingival caps impairing the eruption of some permanent teeth were performed, and the removed tissues were histologically analyzed. RESULTS: Because of the presence of the large "cafe-au-lait" spots, a clinical diagnosis of Von Recklinghausen's disease was given and later confirmed several times by the histological analysis of the gingival biopsies. Now, 6 years later, this gingival enlargement due to the development of intra-gingival neurofibromas is stable and all permanent teeth have had a normal eruption, but alveolar bone growth has been partly impaired by the presence of the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: The present case of unilateral diffuse hyperplasia is a unique clinical expression of neurofibromatosis type I, a slowly evolving neurodermic dysplasia.
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4/18. Extraction as a treatment alternative follows repeated trauma in a severely handicapped patient.

    Handicapped patients with protruding maxillary incisors are prone to repeated dental trauma. A 13-year-old girl with cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation and seizure disorder was referred to our department for restoring the traumatized anterior teeth. Despite drug combination, the frequency of seizure attack was around 10 times a month. The oral examination showed multiple caries, gingival hyperplasia, class II malocclusion with 14 mm overjet and deep overbite. During the first 3 years of a 7-year follow-up period, six episodes of anterior tooth trauma due to seizure attack occurred. The trauma-related treatment performed included endodontic therapy, multiple composite restorations, apical repositional flap, and finally extraction of all four upper incisors with fabrication of a semi-fixed band-retained denture. The denture restored normal overbite and overjet with improved esthetics. For 4 years following the fabrication of denture, no trauma occurred to the anterior teeth in later seizure attacks. Considering inadequate control of seizure disorder, little ability of the patient to receive comprehensive orthodontic treatment, poor prognosis of restorations, and possible future injuries, the removal of non-functional, nonesthetic, trauma-susceptible incisor teeth can be justified as an alternative to tooth preservation.
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5/18. A conservative aesthetic solution for a single anterior edentulous space: case report and one-year follow-up.

    Conservative solutions for the restoration of a single edentulous space in the anterior maxilla present an aesthetic challenge to the clinician. Treatment options for tooth replacement include implant placement, a classical fixed partial denture, or a resin-bonded appliance with a metal substructure or fiber-reinforced resin. The resin-bonded Encore Bridge (daVinci Studios, Woodland Hills, CA) offers a restorative solution that is conservative and aesthetic when compared to the required full-tooth preparation in a conventional three-unit fixed partial denture. This case report addresses the indications, preparation guidelines, and restorative procedures for an Encore Bridge.
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6/18. Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: clinical, radiological and histological aspects of four cases.

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare developmental disorder of the maxilla, primarily involving the posterior part of the maxilla. Clinically, the disorder is often diagnosed in early childhood due to a unilateral buccolingual expansion of the posterior alveolar process, gingival enlargement, absence of one or both premolars in the affected region, delayed eruption of the adjacent teeth and malformations of the primary molars. In this report, four patients with SOD are described. The findings were similar to earlier reports, but for the first time an ipsilateral rough erythema on the skin in two of the subjects is reported.
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7/18. Severe gingival hyperplasia in a child with I-cell disease.

    I-cell disease (mucolipidosis II) is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from the deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme, N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferease. The disease presents as a mental and motor developmental delay with oral manifestations that include severe gingival hyperplasia usually seen before one year of age. The life expectancy of children with this condition is poor, with death usually occurring around the fifth year. A case report of a 3-year-old Pakistani male, with I-cell disease, is presented. The chief dental concerns of the parents were his swollen gums and delayed tooth eruption. Supportive treatment only was initiated. Differential diagnosis for severe gingival overgrowth in young patients should take account of this rare metabolic disorder in addition to hereditary and idiopathic fibromatosis and drug associated gingival overgrowth.
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ranking = 1.2005622121008
keywords = tooth, eruption
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8/18. amelogenesis imperfecta: the multidisciplinary approach. A case report.

    amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary developmental disorder of the dental enamel, in both primary and permanent dentition. The main clinical characteristics are extensive loss of tooth tissue, poor esthetics, and tooth sensitivity. Transmission of the gene takes place by either autosomal, dominant X-linked, or recessive modes. This clinical report describes a treatment sequence based on a multidisciplinary approach. A 21-year-old girl with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta was referred to the Ege University School of dentistry clinic. She was concerned about the poor appearance and sensitivity of her teeth. The patient presented with an anterior open bite, although orthodontic treatment had been completed previously. Periodontal gingivectomy of her posterior teeth followed by endodontic treatment where indicated was proposed. The prosthodontic treatment consisted of metal ceramic fixed partial dentures of precious alloy. At the end of treatment, function and esthetics were improved to a level acceptable to both the patient and the dental team.
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9/18. Destructive membranous periodontal disease (ligneous periodontitis): a case report and 3 years follow-up.

    Destructive membranous periodontal disease is a rare, destructive and poorly defined entity, which is the part of a systemic disease due to plasminogen deficiency and fibrin deposition. The disease is characterised by gingival enlargement and periodontal tissue destruction that leads to rapid tooth loss despite treatment attempts. biopsy is essential to rule out other periodontal disease in the differential diagnosis.
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10/18. Unusual oral manifestations and evolution in glycogen storage disease type Ib.

    glycogen storage disease type Ib is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase with consequent accumulation of glycogen. The purpose of this study is to report a case affected by glycogen storage disease type Ib in which unusual oral findings were evident and to review the pertinent literature. The disease presents with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlacticacidemia, neutropenia, and neutrophilic dysfunction causing increased susceptibility to recurrent infections. Common intraoral manifestations are dental caries, gingivitis, periodontal disease, delayed dental maturation and eruption, oral bleeding diathesis, and oral ulcers. Conversely, unusual oral lesions were observed in this case as hyperplastic-hypertrophic gingiva and giant cell granulomatous epulis. The treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor markedly increased the neutrophil counts and reduced the frequency of infections and inflammations. Proper evaluation of the patient's oral condition, a program of preventive measures, and suitable medical consultation are important to minimize and avoid long-term complications.
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keywords = eruption
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