Cases reported "Gingival Neoplasms"

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11/178. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastatic to the oral mucosa: report of a case with multiple gingival localizations.

    BACKGROUND: Metastases to the oral mucosa are rare, representing less than 1% of the tumors at this site. Most of these metastatic neoplasms originate in the lungs, kidneys, and liver. methods: The clinicopathologic features of an occult hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic to the oral mucosa, are reported. The patient, a 70-year-old male, complained of 3 distinct polypoid, reddish lesions of the antero-inferior alveolar crest and both the right and left postero-superior attached gingiva, without bone involvement. The lesions were excised, with the clinical diagnosis of multiple vascular tumors, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Consecutive sections were immunostained for alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, CEA, cytokeratins, EMA, hepatocyte antigen, PSA, S-100 protein, and thyroglobulin, using the alkaline phosphatase/anti-alkaline phosphatase technique. RESULTS: The morphologic features of the lesions were consistent with the diagnosis of carcinoma with trabecular and glandular patterns and bile secretion; furthermore, immunohistochemical reactivity for alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, cytokeratins, CEA, EMA, and hepatocyte antigen was demonstrated and the hepatic origin of the tumor was postulated. ultrasonography demonstrated a liver mass, which was biopsied and treated by chemoembolization. While no further complications occurred in the oral mucosa, the patient died 8 months after the diagnosis for widespread diffusion of the tumor to the lungs and brain. CONCLUSIONS: This case emphasizes the need to include metastatic tumors in the differential diagnosis of atypical neoplasms of the oral mucosa and to evaluate the opportunity of surgical treatment in order to preserve the functions of the mouth, even if the prognosis of the primary tumors remains unfavorable.
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keywords = gingival
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12/178. Three cases of palatal polyps in infants.

    Fibrous lesions are common in the oral cavity, however, in infants they are rarely reported. We present three cases of palatal polyps in infants aged 2 days, 3 months and 7 months. In two cases, the treatment was surgical removal and in one case the polyp decreased in size and surgical removal was not required. In two infants, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically as fibroepithelial hyperplasia.
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ranking = 4.8357952385604E-5
keywords = hyperplasia
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13/178. Chorioepithelioma presenting as a bleeding gingival mass.

    A case is reported in which a very malignant neoplasm appeared clinically to be a pregnancy tumor or a hemangioma. There was, of course, no question as to the cause of death in this particular case. It was of interest because of the rarity of the tumor, the metastasis to the oral cavity, and the fact that the final diagnosis was established from pathologic examination. The case demonstrates, with emphasis, the great importance of biopsy and routine pathologic examination of all tissue for accurate and correct diagnosis, regardless of its clinical appearance.
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keywords = gingival
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14/178. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: a potentially aggressive lesion in children.

    A slowly enlarging gingival mass with a reddish-purple surface is observed in a school-age boy. The lesion was first noted 3 months ago during a routine oral examination but recently it has increased in size and interferes with eating. A periapical radiograph demonstrated focal loss of the alveolar crestal bone in the mandibular incisor region. The diagnosis of peripheral giant cell granuloma, a benign reactive gingival lesion, is confirmed by histopathologic examination. Early detection and excision of this hyperplastic nodule is important to minimize potential dentoalveolar complications.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = gingival
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15/178. Pyogenic granuloma presenting as a congenital epulis.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a clinical approach to the differential diagnosis of oral lesions in neonates. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Academic ambulatory care center. PARTICIPANTS: male infant. RESULTS: A gingival mass in a male infant appeared clinically consistent with a congenital epulis. Following excision and histologic examination, the diagnosis was determined to be a pyogenic granuloma. Careful attention to alternative diagnoses led to the correct etiology. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care pediatricians encounter neonatal oral lesions infrequently. The most common oral lesions in the newborn period are Epstein pearls and Bohn nodules. This case illustrates the importance of formulating a more extensive differential diagnosis on discovery of a neonatal oral mass.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = gingival
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16/178. Gingival peripheral odontoma in an adult: case report.

    BACKGROUND: odontoma arising in the extraosseous soft tissue is extremely uncommon. We describe our experience of gingival peripheral odontoma in which the initial presentation was a small asymptomatic nodule. methods: Case study. RESULTS: A 44-year-old man reported with a firm gingival mass of the anterior maxilla which had been gradually enlarging over 5 years. Radiographic examination showed a dense radiopaque mass occupying most of the tumor and no evidence of underlying intraosseous lesion. The pathology was reported as odontoma. CONCLUSIONS: This is the fourth reported case of peripheral odontoma in the gingiva.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = gingival
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17/178. Peripheral clear cell calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Report of a case.

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is an uncommon, locally aggressive odontogenic tumor representing less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Clear cells have been described in CEOT, ameloblastomas, calcifying odontogenic cysts, lateral periodontal, and gingival cysts. It is not yet clear if the clear cell variants of the odontogenic tumors have a different biologic behavior, even if it seems that these tumors are more aggressive with an higher recurrence rate. The authors present a case of a peripheral clear cell CEOT (CCCEOT). It is a rare lesion with only 9 cases reported in the literature. The lesion was removed by excision and no recurrence was found after a 4-year follow-up.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = gingival
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18/178. Unusual gingival presentation of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a well-documented complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, it is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of lymphocytes, which can range from benign B-cell hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with several risk factors, such as congenital or acquired immunodeficiency states, autoimmune disorders, and infectious agents (eg, Epstein-Barr virus). Primary sites of presentation in the head and neck are Waldeyer's ring, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, the oral cavity, and the larynx. Clinical appearance of gingival NHL varies but is usually found to be an asymptomatic gingival enlargement or mass resembling a pyogenic granuloma. We present a patient with a gingival ulceration that was subsequently diagnosed as Epstein-Barr virus malignant lymphoma resulting from the immunosuppression needed to prevent graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation.
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ranking = 1.7500483579524
keywords = gingival, hyperplasia
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19/178. Undefined complications of parathyroid adenoma, parathyroid hyperplasia (primary hyperparathyroidism), thyroid follicular adenoma, thyroid papillary carcinoma, temporal astrocytoma, cerebellar meningioma, and hemangioma of external auditory meatus and oral papilloma.

    A 59-year-old woman who had parathyroid adenoma, parathyroid hyperplasia, thyroid follicular adenoma, thyroid papillary carcinoma, astrocytoma of the right temporal lobe, cerebellar meningioma, capillary hemangioma of the left external auditory meatus and papilloma of the left upper gingiva is reported. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography with contrast-enhancement and gastrofiberscopy revealed no remarkable findings in the pituitary, pancreas, adrenals, stomach or duodenum. Similar lesions were not found in any family members. Defect of the causative genes of multiple endocrine neoplasia types I and IIa, MENIN and RET was not detected. Further follow-up of this patient and family members is needed.
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ranking = 0.00024178976192802
keywords = hyperplasia
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20/178. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder presenting as a mandibular gingival swelling.

    Oral cavity metastases mostly originate from the breasts, lungs, or kidneys. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most frequent malignant tumor of the urinary bladder, rarely metastasizes to the jaws. To the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of bladder carcinoma have been reported in the English literature to metastasize to the jawbones. A new case of mandibular metastasis of urinary bladder TCC with extension to the gingiva is presented in a 64-year-old white man. The patient was referred for a periodontal infection of the upper right first molar. The clinical examination also showed a gingival swelling located in the lower left premolar region with a hypoasthesia of the left side of the lower lip. The gingival mass was biopsied, and the microscopy showed a mandibular metastatic TCC of the urinary bladder extending to the gingiva. Periodontists should be aware that, although gingival metastases are rare, when they occur they may mimic other local benign pathological conditions.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = gingival
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