Cases reported "Gingivitis"

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1/56. Histopathology and electron and immunofluorescence microscopy of gingivitis granulomatosa associated with glossitis and cheilitis in a case of Anderson-fabry disease.

    A 17-year-old white boy with signs, symptoms, and family history of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum universale, Anderson-fabry disease (AFD), developed recurrent and then persistent swelling of both lips, erythematous hyperplastic gingivae, and a pebbled tongue. Positive blood findings were raised serum IgE, decreased T-cell level, and increased B-cell level. Histopathology of the gingiva showed noncaseating granulomas with multinucleate giant cells containing Schaumann bodies and large plasma-cell infiltrates in which immunofluorescence demonstrated immune globulins of several classes. Electron microscopy and histochemistry demonstrated ceramide in the vasculature. No glycolipid was found in the macrophages or giant cells of the granulomas which, in contrast, resembled sarcoid reactions. plasma cells with Russell bodies and immune reaction-induced degranulation of mast cells were also identified. The pathogenesis of the oral findings possibly relates to altered immune reactivity associated with damage to the microvasculature analogous to that in melkersson-rosenthal syndrome.
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keywords = white
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2/56. Allergic contact gingivostomatitis from a temporary crown made of methacrylates and epoxy diacrylates.

    Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by (meth)acrylates is common in dental personnel, whereas dental acrylic fillings and crowns have rarely been reported to cause problems in dental patients. Here we report on a 48-year-old woman who developed gingivitis, stomatitis, and perioral dermatitis after a temporary crown made of restorative, two-component material had been inserted. The manufacturer stated that the temporary crown base paste and catalyst contained three (meth)acrylates, namely, a proacrylate, which is a modification of 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BIS-GMA); a tricyclate, which is a saturated, aliphatic, tricyclic methacrylate; and urethane methacrylate. The manufacturer refused to give more exact information on the (meth)acrylates. Patch testing revealed that the patient was highly allergic to BIS-GMA, other epoxy diacrylates, and (meth)acrylates, as well as to the base paste and catalyst of the temporary crown. Accordingly, it was concluded that the allergic reaction was caused by BIS-GMA, or a cross-reacting (meth)acrylate, or other (meth)acrylates in the temporary crown.
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ranking = 20533.748721906
keywords = dental
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3/56. Implant site development using orthodontic extrusion: a case report.

    One of the most important factors in the successful placement of endosseous implants is the presence of adequate alveolar bone at the recipient site. alveolar bone loss associated with destructive periodontal disease frequently results in osseous defects that may complicate subsequent implant placement. Typically, such defects are treated prior to or at the time of implant surgery using the principles of guided bone regeneration. Under certain circumstances, however, such defects may be managed non-surgically by orthodontic extrusion. orthodontic extrusion can be used to increase the vertical bone height and volume and to establish a more favourable soft-tissue profile prior to implant placement. The addition, the increase in the vertical osseous dimension at interproximal sites may assist in the preservation of the interdental papillae and can further enhance gingival aesthetics. This report illustrates the treatment sequence for site development with orthodontic extrusion prior to immediate implant placement.
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ranking = 6844.582907302
keywords = dental
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4/56. Foreign body gingivitis associated with a new crown: EDX analysis and review of the literature.

    Gingival inflammation associated with foreign bodies in connective tissue is termed Foreign Body gingivitis (FBG). It is not commonly recognized by clinicians and has recently been described fully in the literature. It is more common in females, and the incidence by age follows a normal distribution, unlike bacterially-induced gingivitis. Most frequently, a red or red-and-white painful, chronic lesion, it has usually been present for less than one year and does not resolve with optimization of oral hygiene. It may be clinically confused with lichen planus. There is no gingival site predilection. Microscopically, foreign bodies are associated with the gingival inflammation, and elemental analysis suggests that they are usually derived from abrasives, and less commonly from restorative materials. Treatment of FBG is still unclear and its prevention is discussed. A case is presented in which a patient developed localized foreign body gingivitis after placement of a crown. Elemental analysis using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) of the foreign particles was most consistent with an abrasive material.
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5/56. Early tooth loss due to cyclic neutropenia: long-term follow-up of one patient.

    In young patients with abnormal loosening of teeth and periodontal breakdown, dental professionals should consider a wide range of etiological factors/diseases, analyze differential diagnoses, and make appropriate referrals. The long-term oral and dental follow-up of a female patient diagnosed in early infancy with cyclic neutropenia is reviewed, and recommendations for care are discussed.
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ranking = 13689.165814604
keywords = dental
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6/56. Oral rehabilitation of a hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia patient: a 6-year follow-up.

    This case report describes the oral rehabilitation of a female child with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia over a 6-year time period. It demonstrates the need for periodic modification and replacement of a prosthesis, an orthodontic appliance, and a gingivoplasty. Although the initial treatment plan was considered to be a compromise due to limited cooperation, an improvement was observed in the patient's social behavior as a consequence of her dental treatment. The effects of unavoidable changes in the dental team over 6 years are also discussed.
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ranking = 13689.165814604
keywords = dental
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7/56. Ehlers-Danlos type VIII. review of the literature.

    Ehlers-Danlos type VIII is a rare disorder characterized by soft, hyperextensible skin, abnormal scarring, easy bruising, and generalized periodontitis with early loss of teeth. To illustrate the clinical dermatological and dental features, we present the case history of a 20-year-old patient who has suffered from poor healing of wounds at the shins and knees since childhood, which have developed into hyperpigmented atrophic scars. In the course of orthodontic treatment during the last 3 years, severe apical root resorption, gingival recession, and loss of alveolar bone were observed. family history was noncontributory for any skin or tooth disorders. The typical clinical signs confirmed the diagnosis of ehlers-danlos syndrome type VIII. As there is no specific treatment for the disorder, management is limited to the symptomatic treatment of the dental disease. It seems advisable to consider carefully the indications for orthodontic treatment in patients with Ehlers-Danlos type VIII syndrome.
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ranking = 13689.165814604
keywords = dental
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8/56. Allergy to a common component of resin-bonding systems: a case report.

    Allergies to materials routinely used in dentistry are becoming more prevalent. The hydrophilic resin 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate is a common constituent of systems designed to bond resin-based restorative materials to dentine. It has been considered to have a high sensitizing potential, although dental patient-related allergies to the resin appear to be rare. This report presents details of a patient who has such an allergy, which, it is suspected, manifested as an intra-oral lichenoid reaction to the closely approximating anterior restorations.
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ranking = 6844.582907302
keywords = dental
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9/56. The dental management of a child with leopard syndrome.

    This report describes the dental management of a child with leopard syndrome who presented with multiple grossly carious primary teeth. comprehensive dental care was carried out under general anaesthesia.
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ranking = 41067.497443812
keywords = dental
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10/56. dyskeratosis congenita: report of a case.

    dyskeratosis congenita is a rare multisystem condition involving mainly the ectoderm. It is characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and leukoplakia of mucous membranes. Oral and dental abnormalities may also be present. Complications are a predisposition to malignancy and bone marrow involvement with pancytopenia. The case of a 14-year-old girl is described who presented with several of the characteristic systemic features of this condition, together with the following oral features: hypodontia, diminutive maxillary lateral incisors, delayed dental eruption, crowding in the maxillary premolar region, short roots, poor oral hygiene, gingival inflammation and bleeding, alveolar bone loss, caries and a smooth atrophic tongue with leukoplakia. Although this condition is rare, dental surgeons should be aware of the dental abnormalities that exist and the risk of malignant transformation within the areas of leukoplakia.
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ranking = 28942.742294028
keywords = dental, caries
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