Cases reported "Glaucoma"

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1/33. hyphema associated with pupillary dilation in a patient with exfoliation glaucoma and warfarin therapy.

    PURPOSE: To describe an unusual hemorrhagic complication associated with pupillary dilation in a patient with exfoliation glaucoma taking anticoagulation therapy. methods: A 78-year-old woman with bilateral exfoliation glaucoma who was receiving warfarin, 2 mg daily, for systemic anticoagulation developed acute visual loss in the right eye several hours after pupillary dilation. RESULT: Examination disclosed bilateral advanced exfoliation glaucoma, localized vascularized iridolenticular adhesions in the right eye, and a 4-mm layered hyphema in the right eye. CONCLUSION: patients with exfoliation glaucoma and vascularized posterior synechiae who are receiving anticoagulation therapy are at increased risk for visually significant spontaneous hyphema after pupillary dilation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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2/33. Air bag-associated ocular trauma in children.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a series of children with ocular injuries related to air bag deployment. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational case series. PARTICIPANTS: Seven patients with ocular injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents in which air bags were deployed. methods: review of medical records. RESULTS: All patients had periocular contusions. Minor injuries included corneal abrasions (n = 5), superficial eyelid laceration (n = 1), and traumatic iritis (n = 2). Serious injuries included corneal edema (n = 1) and a traumatic hyphema with secondary glaucoma and cataract (n = 1). The latter patient required surgery. All other injuries resolved with medical therapy. All patients recovered normal visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: Serious ocular injuries in children may result from air bag deployment. Most such injuries are minor and resolve without sequela. It is recommended that infants and children travel in the rear seat of automobiles to minimize their risk of injury.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hyphema
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3/33. Transcorneal oxygen therapy for glaucoma associated with sickle cell hyphema.

    PURPOSE: To study three patients with glaucoma caused by sickle cell hyphema who were successfully treated with transcorneal oxygen therapy. methods: case reports. Three patients with increased intraocular pressure caused by sickle cell hyphema were administered transcorneal oxygen therapy using humidified oxygen at a flow rate that ranged from 1 to 3 l/minute. RESULTS: All three patients had a dramatic reduction in their intraocular pressure within hours of receiving oxygen therapy. No complications were associated with the oxygen therapy. CONCLUSION: Transcorneal oxygen therapy can reduce intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma from sickle cell hyphema. Further study is warranted to evaluate this new therapy.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = hyphema
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4/33. Hemorrhage into the lens as a complication of glaucoma surgery.

    Intralenticular hemorrhage is a rare complication of glaucoma surgery. In a 45-year-old man, the intralenticular blood caused loss of the red reflex from the fundus postoperatively. Clinically, hemorrhage into the lens has usually been misdiagnosed initially as a hyphema.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hyphema
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5/33. An unusual case of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema (UGH) syndrome in which anterior chamber paracentesis led to the diagnosis of sickle cell trait. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: A 43-year-old Cuban pseudophakic male was seen multiple times over a 3-year period complaining of floaters and blurry vision in his left eye. He was noted to have an inferotemporally displaced posterior chamber intraocular lens and recurrent microhyphemas with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) readings between 29 and 46 mm Hg with each episode. He was diagnosed with UGH syndrome. Posterior chamber intraocular lens explantation and anterior chamber washout was performed. The aqueous fluid was submitted for cytopathologic examination. RESULTS: Postoperatively, the patient's symptoms resolved and he had no further hemorrhages or elevated IOP readings. Cytopathology of the aspirate revealed sickled red blood cells. CONCLUSIONS: Microscopic examination of aqueous fluid can be a valuable tool in diagnosing ophthalmic manifestations of systemic disease.
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ranking = 3
keywords = hyphema
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6/33. battered child syndrome simulating congenital glaucoma.

    A 9-week-old child with "congenital glaucoma" was later found to have, in addition to enlarged corneas and elevated intraocular pressure, subluxated and cataractous lenses, hyphema, iridodialysis, angle recession, and vitreous hemorrhage, along with signs of gross parental neglect and physical abuse. To our knowledge, this is the first report in which a battered child with bilateral "congenital glaucoma" (probably caused by trauma) is described.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hyphema
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7/33. Bottle-cork injury to the eye: a review of 13 cases.

    PURPOSE: To analyze the anatomic and functional consequences of wine-cork injury to the eye in relation to the patient's age and the type of cork and wine. methods: We retrospectively studied 13 patients, six women and seven men, presenting to our department with bottle-cork injury to the eye between January 1999 and June 2001. RESULTS: All patients presented with closed-globe injury according to Kuhn et al's classification. All the cases were injured by bottle corks from sparkling wine: white in ten cases and red in three. Mean visual acuity at admission was 20/100 (range, hand motion to 20/20). The most frequent early injury was anterior chamber hyphema (84.6%), followed by corneal injury (62.2%), ocular hypertension (46.1%), lens subluxation (30.8%), traumatic cataract (23.1%), and post-traumatic retinal edema (23.1%). Mean final visual acuity was 20/25; the follow-up ranged from 3 to 29 months, averaging 16.1 months. Late complications were as follows: pupil motility anomalies (38.5%), traumatic cataract (30.8%), iridodialysis (15.4%), traumatic optic neuropathy (7.7%), post-traumatic glaucoma (7.7%), and traumatic maculopathy (15.4%). Surgical treatment was necessary in two cases (15.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Bottle-cork eye injuries account for 10.8% of post-traumatic hospital admissions to our department. Most of them are due to sparkling white wine served at room temperature. There is no correlation between ocular injury and the eye-bottle distance or the type of cork.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hyphema
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8/33. Bimanual bipolar diathermy for recurrent hyphema after anterior segment intraocular surgery.

    phacoemulsification with mechanical pupil dilation was performed on a functionally monocular glaucoma patient with pseudoexfoliation syndrome. The postoperative course was complicated by persistent intraocular hemorrhaging from the pupil margin in multiple locations that ceased temporarily with a marked elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP). Normalization of IOP with medication or paracentesis resulted in recurrent bleeding and a subsequent increase in IOP elevation. Surgical intervention using bipolar diathermy was required to control the bleeding and the elevated IOP. A bimanual approach allowed the corrective procedure to be performed in a simple and efficacious manner.
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ranking = 2
keywords = hyphema
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9/33. Treatment of post-traumatic trabecular mashwork thrombosis and secondary glaucoma with intracameral tissue plasminogen activator in previously unrecognized sickle cell anemia.

    Intracameral tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) application in a child with previously unrecognized sickle cell anemia, post-traumatic hyphema, thrombosis in trabecular mashwork and consecutive acute glaucoma showed positive results. Thirteen year-old boy, son of African father and Caucasian mother, was admitted to hospital, with symptoms of acute glaucoma and partial hyphema after right eye trauma. visual acuity of affected eye was 0.5 and intraocular pressure (IOP) 46 mm Hg. Despite a common therapy three days later clinical condition of patient's right eye was getting worst. visual acuity was only hand motion (HM) and IOP 53 mmHg. At this point rose suspicion of sickle cell disease (SCD) and decision about injecting t-PA (20 microg) into anterior chamber was made. Cytological examination of aqueous humor revealed 10% sickled erythrocytes. Hemoglobin electrophoresis discovered hemoglobin S so that diagnosis of SCD was confirmed. Intraocular application of t-PA showed excellent results in post-traumatic hyphema with trabecular mashwork thrombosis in the patient with sickle cell anemia. Two-years follow up confirmed permanent normalisation of IOP and visual acuity. Successful outcome with anterior chamber paracentesis and intracameral injection of t-PA is promising novel approach, which we recommend in treatment of post-traumatic hyphema in SCD.
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ranking = 2
keywords = hyphema
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10/33. Differential diagnosis of spontaneous hyphema associated with central retinal vein occlusion.

    Spontaneous hyphema refers to a nontraumatic hemorrhage in the anterior chamber. It is uncommon and may result from such conditions as rubeosis iridis, intraocular neoplasms, blood dyscrasias, severe iritis, fibrovascular membranes in the retrolental or zonular area, and vascular anomalies of the iris. A case is presented describing a spontaneous hyphema occurring as a result of iris neovascularization in a patient who suffered from occlusion of the central retinal vein. Spontaneous hyphema and the presenting ocular conditions as they pertain to its occurrence are discussed.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = hyphema
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