Cases reported "Glioblastoma"

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1/164. Secondary glioblastoma remarkably reduced by steroid administration after anaplastic transformation from gliomatosis cerebri--case report.

    A 45-year-old female presented with gliomatosis cerebri manifesting as hemiballismus-like involuntary movement in the arm, motor weakness in the leg, and hypesthesia in her left side. Computed tomography showed only diffuse swelling of the right cerebral hemisphere, but T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed a diffuse lesion spreading from the right thalamus to the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes on the same side. No abnormal enhancement was recognized. cerebral angiography showed no specific finding. A right occipital lobectomy was performed to confirm the diagnosis of gliomatosis cerebri. Anaplastic transformation was recognized 5 months later. The disease did not resolve with radiation or interferon administration, but steroid therapy achieved remarkably effective tumor regression. The patient died due to pneumonia. autopsy showed the features of diffuse glioblastoma. Steroid therapy may be an effective treatment for gliomatosis cerebri before the terminal stage.
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2/164. Congenital glioblastoma diagnosed by fetal sonography.

    Congenital brain tumors are very rare, and 2-9% of them are accounted for by glioblastomas. We encountered a case of congenital glioblastoma detected at the 39th week of gestation by fetal sonography, which revealed a large echogenic mass in the left temporo-parietal area of the fetal brain with significant midline shift and dilatation of the contralateral lateral ventricle. A detailed sonogram obtained 7 h later showed that the mass had increased in size, and this suggested an expanding hematoma. An emergency cesarean section was performed. Postnatal MRI demonstrated an enhancing mass with a large hematoma. biopsy revealed a malignant brain tumor. Further management was refused and the boy died 6 days after birth. The postmortem pathological diagnosis was glioblastoma. When fetal sonography demonstrates an echogenic mass, a congenital brain tumor should be considered. The mode of delivery should be determined by the nature of the mass and the condition of the fetus.
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3/164. Transient MRI enhancement in a patient with seizures and previously resected glioma: use of MRS.

    A 35-year-old man presented with partial seizures 10 years after resection of a left-sided glioblastoma multiforme. At the old operative site MRI demonstrated extensive cortical and white matter gadolinium enhancement, and PET showed hypermetabolism. biopsy of the area was postponed when MRS showed a normal biochemical spectrum. MRI and PET abnormalities resolved after control of the seizures. MRS is noninvasive and can provide essential information in the management of patients with seizures and previously treated cerebral neoplasms.
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4/164. dissection of the middle cerebral artery caused by invasion of malignant glioma presenting as acute onset of hemiplegia.

    A 57-year-old, previously healthy man who developed acute onset of hemiplegia is presented. Neuro-imaging studies on admission suggested dissection of the middle cerebral artery producing infarction in the frontotemporal region. In contrast to his stable clinical course, serial neuro-imaging studies disclosed rapid growth of malignant glioma, which was confirmed at surgery. Microscopic examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated invasion of glioma cells into the arterial wall associated with intramural haematoma formation of the middle cerebral artery. This case is the first to document dissection of an intracranial artery caused by invasion of tumour cells.
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keywords = cerebral
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5/164. glioblastoma multiforme at the site of metal splinter injury: a coincidence? Case report.

    The authors report the case of a man who had suffered a penetrating metal splinter injury to the left frontal lobe at 18 years of age. Thirty-seven years later the patient developed a left-sided frontal tumor at the precise site of the meningocerebral scar and posttraumatic defect. Histological examination confirmed a glioblastoma multiforme adjacent to the dural scar and metal splinters. In addition, a chronic abscess from which propionibacterium acnes was isolated was found within the glioma tissue. The temporal and local association of metal splinter injury with chronic abscess, scar formation, and malignant glioma is highly suggestive of a causal relationship between trauma and the development of a malignant brain tumor.
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6/164. Cerebral vasculopathy secondary to leptomeningeal gliomatosis: angiography.

    We describe a young woman with a glioblastoma multiforme in whom angiography showed multiple intracranial stenoses. The resected tumour was found to be invading cerebral vessels.
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7/164. Hemodynamic changes in simple partial epilepsy: a functional MRI study.

    We performed functional MRI (fMRI) on a patient with a mass lesion while she happened to experience a simple partial seizure. We used regional T2* signal changes to localize seizure-related hemodynamic changes. Seizure activity was associated with changes in MR signal in different regions that showed sequential activation and deactivation. Our study has shown that epileptic activity leads to changes in cerebral hemodynamics. In selected patients, therefore, it might be possible to use fMRI as a noninvasive tool to detect and investigate cortical patterns of activation associated with seizure activity.
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8/164. Uncommon metastasis of a glioblastoma multiforme in liver and spleen.

    A case of a glioblastoma multiforme is presented. craniotomy was performed with total resection of the right temporal tumor. Postoperatively, the patient received adjuvant radiotherapy, but 6 months after therapy he developed severe nausea and weight loss. recurrence of an intracranial tumor in the right temporal region with nodules in the liver and spleen were detected by CT scan. Fine-needle biopsies of the liver confirmed the diagnosis of a glioblastoma metastasis with characteristic immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein. This rare case of an intracerebral glioblastoma metastasizing to liver and spleen was managed by systemic chemotherapy.
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keywords = cerebral
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9/164. Simultaneous quantitative cerebral perfusion and Gd-DTPA extravasation measurement with dual-echo dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI.

    Quantification of cerebral perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI generally relies on the assumption of an intact blood-brain barrier. The present study proposes a method to correct the tissue response function that does not require this assumption, thus, allowing perfusion studies in, for example, high-grade brain tumors. The correction for contrast extravasation in the tissue during the bolus passage is based on a two-compartment kinetic model. The method separates the intravascular hemodynamic response and the extravascular component and returns the corrected tissue response function for perfusion quantification as well as the extravasation rate constant of the vasculature. Results of simulation experiments with different degrees of contrast extravasation are presented. The clinical potential is illustrated by determination of the perfusion and extravasation of a glioblastoma multiforme. The correction scheme proves to be fast and reliable even in cases of low signal-to-noise ratio. It is applicable whether extravasation occurs or not. When extravasation is present, application of the proposed method is mandatory for accurate cerebral blood volume measurements. Magn Reson Med 43:820-827, 2000.
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keywords = cerebral
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10/164. Spinal leptomeningeal metastases of giant cell glioblastoma associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage: case report.

    A case of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) due to spinal leptomeningeal metastases of a giant cell glioblastoma is described. A 51 year old male presented with a four week history of headache. Neurological examination was normal except for a slight left hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cyst with a mural nodule in the right temporal lobe. The tumour was removed followed by 60 Gy of radiation therapy. Thirty-two months later he developed headache and shoulder pain with symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus. Head CT showed ventriculomegaly and SAH. magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal leptomeningeal metastases at the C4-5, T12, and L2 levels, but no local recurrence or tumour dissemination in the brain. He died 34 months after surgery. autopsy revealed diffuse SAH over the whole brain and spinal cord, associated with spinal leptomeningeal metastases, but no cerebral aneurysms. Spinal radiotherapy and ventriculoperitoneal shunting could possibly have extended survival in this patient.
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