Cases reported "Glomus Jugulare Tumor"

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1/21. Cochleo-vestibular manifestations of jugular foramen pathologies.

    patients presenting pathologies of the jugular foramen are presented, for whom the main symptoms are of cochleo-vestibular nature. A classification of the various pathologies is attempted, the anatomy reviewed and hypotheses capable of producing the symptom elaborated.
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ranking = 1
keywords = foramen
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2/21. The preservation and reconstruction of cerebral veins and sinuses.

    Although cerebral veins and venous sinuses are very important to the neurosurgeon, they have received adequate attention only recently. The consequences of cerebral venous occlusion are well known. When the venous outflow is compromised due to a lack of adequate collateral circulation, venous infarction follows, with swelling, haemorrhage and neuronal death. The clinical consequences will depend upon the region of involvement of the brain and the site of the infarcted tissue. The symptoms may include seizures, hemiplegia, aphasia, coma and death. Similarly, the consequences of cerebral venous sinus occlusion depend upon the availability of collateral circulation. When such collaterals are not available, papilledema and visual loss and a pseudotumour cerebri syndrome are observed in milder cases, whereas, severe diffuse brain swelling, coma and death may be observed in severe cases. Acute venous or venous sinus occlusion is potentially very dangerous, whereas slow and chronic venous or venous sinus occlusion is better tolerated. Even in such patients, some neurological manifestations may follow, when the collaterals are poor.
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ranking = 0.0024163520793654
keywords = cerebral
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3/21. Schwannoma of the jugular foramen.

    Two cases of schwannoma limited to the jugular foramen are described. This entity may clinically and radiologically resemble glomus jugulare tumors so closely, that only careful histological examination of an adequate surgical tumor specimen can provide a definitive diagnosis. Since documentation of this form of neurogenic tumor is lacking in the literature, it suggests that the entity is very rare or that such tumors may be erroneously classified as glomus jugulare tumors. The two cases in this study were managed surgically by subtotal removal via a wide transmastoid approach.
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keywords = foramen
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4/21. Reversible cochleo-vestibular deficits in two cases of jugular foramen tumor after surgery.

    Primary jugular foramen (JF) tumor, such as glomus jugular tumor or JF schwannoma, may manifest as a lower cranial nerve deficit; in addition, it can be accompanied by deafness or vertigo if it affects the cranial nerve (CN) VIII. Recently, we encountered JF schwannoma 1 and glomus jugulare tumor 1. Both cases invaded the adjacent cerebellopontine angle, leading to cochleo-vestibular deficits prior to the operation. After surgery, recovery of the audiovestibular function, including hearing, auditory brainstem response and caloric response, was anticipated in both patients. Therefore, cochleo-vestibular deficits in JF tumors can be attributed to compression neuropathy, rather than tumor infiltration.
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keywords = foramen
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5/21. Jugular foramen tumors: diagnosis and treatment.

    OBJECT: Jugular foramen tumors are rare skull base lesions that present diagnostic and complex management problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients with jugular foramen tumors who were surgically treated in the past 16 years, and to analyze the surgical technique, complications, and outcomes. methods: The authors retrospectively studied 102 patients with jugular foramen tumors treated between January 1987 and May 2004. All patients underwent surgery with a multidisciplinary method combining neurosurgical and ear, nose, and throat techniques. Preoperative embolization was performed for paragangliomas and other highly vascularized lesions. To avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and to improve cosmetic results, the surgical defect was reconstructed with specially developed vascularized flaps (temporalis fascia, cervical fascia, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and temporalis muscle). A saphenous graft bypass was used in two patients with tumor infiltrating the internal carotid artery (ICA). facial nerve reconstruction was performed with grafts of the great auricular nerve or with 12th/seventh cranial nerve anastomosis. Residual malignant and invasive tumors were irradiated after partial removal. The most common tumor was paraganglioma (58 cases), followed by schwannomas (17 cases) and meningiomas (10 cases). Complete excision was possible in 45 patients (77.5%) with paragangliomas and in all patients with schwannomas. The most frequent and also the most dangerous surgical complication was lower cranial nerve deficit. This deficit occurred in 10 patients (10%), but it was transient in four cases. Postoperative facial and cochlear nerve paralysis occurred in eight patients (8%); spontaneous recovery occurred in three of them. In the remaining five patients the facial nerve was reconstructed using great auricular nerve grafts (three cases), sural nerve graft (one case), and hypoglossal/facial nerve anastomosis (one case). Four patients (4%) experienced postoperative CSF leakage, and four (4.2%) died after surgery. Two of them died of aspiration pneumonia complicated with septicemia. Of the remaining two, one died of pulmonary embolism and the other of cerebral hypoxia caused by a large cervical hematoma that led to tracheal deviation. CONCLUSIONS: Paragangliomas are the most common tumors of the jugular foramen region. Surgical management of jugular foramen tumors is complex and difficult. Radical removal of benign jugular foramen tumors is the treatment of choice, may be curative, and is achieved with low mortality and morbidity rates. Larger lesions can be radically excised in one surgical procedure by using a multidisciplinary approach. Reconstruction of the skull base with vascularized myofascial flaps reduces postoperative CSF leaks. Postoperative lower cranial nerves deficits are the most dangerous complication.
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ranking = 2.0003451931542
keywords = foramen, cerebral
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6/21. glomus jugulare tumor presentation and management: a case study.

    Glomus jugulare tumors are rare, normally benign, paragangliomas located in and around the jugular foramen at the base of the skull. They may cause significant lower cranial nerve deficits due to mass effect, and as part of the chromaffin cell system (including pheochromocytomas), they may also actively secrete catecholamines. Resection, while frequently difficult, is the treatment of choice. nurses caring for patients with glomus jugulare tumors need to be skilled in recognizing lower cranial nerve deficits and complications that may arise related to inappropriate catecholamine release or due to disruption of cerebral venous return by tumor or surgery.
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ranking = 0.2003451931542
keywords = foramen, cerebral
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7/21. Cerebral venous thrombosis: new causes for an old syndrome?

    The range of disorders affecting the cerebral veins and sinuses is increasing and now includes blood disorders, abnormalities in the patterns of blood flow, and infiltrative or inflammatory conditions, all of which may promote thrombosis. We describe 10 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis: two had protein s deficiency, one had protein c deficiency, one was in early pregnancy, and there was a single case of each of the following: dural arteriovenous malformation, intracerebral arteriovenous malformation, bilateral glomus tumours, systemic lupus erythematosus, Wegener's granulomatosis, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The recognition of such diverse aetiology may be importance since clinical features are non-specific, and may consist only of raised intracranial pressure, allowing confusion with 'benign intracranial hypertension'. The existence of effective treatment both for the thrombosis and for many of the underlying disorders makes early diagnosis essential. The prognosis of treated patients may be favourable.
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ranking = 0.0010355794625852
keywords = cerebral
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8/21. Myeloma manifesting as a large jugular tumor: case report.

    The authors report a case of cranial plasmacytoma with multiple myelomas and palsy of the lower cranial nerves. The osteolytic lesion adjacent to the jugular foramen was demonstrated by an angiogram to be exceedingly hypervascular, with arteriovenous shunting resembling that seen in paragangliomas. Forty-five cases of cranial and intracranial plasmacytoma from the literature were reviewed. The findings indicate that a cranial plasmacytoma commonly appears to be a hypervascular tumor, whereas most dural tumors or intraparenchymal tumors have poor vascularity.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = foramen
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9/21. Management of a glomus jugulare tumour with internal carotid artery involvement.

    A previously healthy 40-year-old female presented for surgical resection of a large glomus jugulare tumour with extensive involvement of the carotid siphon and intracranial extension. Conduct of anaesthesia with specific reference to cerebral protection is discussed. A combination of induced hypothermia, barbiturate therapy, normotension, normocarbia and prior clamping of the distal internal carotid artery was chosen. The role of barbiturates as a therapeutic intervention is debated.
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ranking = 0.00034519315419505
keywords = cerebral
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10/21. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma simulating glomus jugulare tumor.

    A 59-year-old man presented with jugular foramen syndrome caused by a mass with roentgenographic and histologic features highly suggestive of a glomus jugulare tumor. However, electron microscopic examination of the surgical specimen revealed features diagnostic of a previously unsuspected renal cell carcinoma. Because primary tumors of the glomus jugulare and metastatic renal cell carcinoma may present with the same clinical and roentgenographic findings and look similar histologically, careful electron microscopic examination of the tumor and urologic screening should be performed in suspected cases of glomus jugulare tumors.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = foramen
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