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1/3. Atypical benign migratory glossitis. Report of a case with histologic and electron microscopic evaluations.

    A case of benign migratory glossitis atypically confined to only one side of the tongue is presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by repeated histopathologic evaluation. Electron microscopic studies revealed a striking intimacy between sensory nerve processes and the basal lamina of the lingual epithelium.
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2/3. Symptomatic benign migratory glossitis: report of two cases and literature review.

    Benign migratory glossitis (geographic tongue) is a common clinical finding in routine pediatric dentistry. The condition usually discovered on routine clinical examination, appearing as an asymptomatic, ulcer-like region on the dorsum of the tongue. The lesion may recur at different sites on the tongue, creating a migratory appearance, and in many cases, will resolve completely. The presentation of symptomatic geographic tongue in children is rare. This article presents two cases of symptomatic geographic tongue. Both children presented with a chief complaint of significant oral pain which was affecting daily activity, eating, and sleeping. Both patients presented with a classical clinical presentation of ulcer-like regions on the dorsum of the tongue in which the filiform papillae were denuded. Successful management was achieved with topical and systemic antihistamine. The clinician should be aware that this condition may be symptomatic in children.
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3/3. Atypical migratory stomatitis and munchausen syndrome presenting as periorbital ecchymosis and mandibular subluxation.

    stomatitis areata migrans, unlike its analogue on the tongue, migratory glossitis, is not easily recognized and is so uncommon and varied in appearance that it may escape definitive diagnosis. It may be so puzzling to the clinician that the patient's credibility may be questioned. A detailed report of a case is presented in which an atypical migratory stomatitis went undiagnosed. Bizarre patient behavior followed in the form of self-inflicted injury (munchausen syndrome) as the patient attempted to convince the care providers of the true existence of lesions in order to maintain their interest and to obtain relief from discomfort.
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