Cases reported "Glossitis"

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1/22. Histopathology and electron and immunofluorescence microscopy of gingivitis granulomatosa associated with glossitis and cheilitis in a case of Anderson-fabry disease.

    A 17-year-old white boy with signs, symptoms, and family history of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum universale, Anderson-fabry disease (AFD), developed recurrent and then persistent swelling of both lips, erythematous hyperplastic gingivae, and a pebbled tongue. Positive blood findings were raised serum IgE, decreased T-cell level, and increased B-cell level. Histopathology of the gingiva showed noncaseating granulomas with multinucleate giant cells containing Schaumann bodies and large plasma-cell infiltrates in which immunofluorescence demonstrated immune globulins of several classes. Electron microscopy and histochemistry demonstrated ceramide in the vasculature. No glycolipid was found in the macrophages or giant cells of the granulomas which, in contrast, resembled sarcoid reactions. plasma cells with Russell bodies and immune reaction-induced degranulation of mast cells were also identified. The pathogenesis of the oral findings possibly relates to altered immune reactivity associated with damage to the microvasculature analogous to that in melkersson-rosenthal syndrome.
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2/22. Chronic herpes simplex virus type I glossitis in an immunocompromised man.

    herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the tongue commonly accompanies acute primary herpetic gingivostomatitis. However, recurrent infection of the tongue is exceptional and is restricted to immunocompromised individuals. A 57-year-old man with corticosteroid-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sciatica presented with a chronic median glossitis due to HSV-1. The main clinical and histological feature was massive necrosis of the entire mucosa. immunohistochemistry demonstrated a considerable amount of HSV gB, gC and gD envelope glycoproteins dispersed in the chorion. In contrast, HSV-1 dna was detected only in a limited number of epithelial cells using in situ hybridization. The extent of necrosis and the pattern of viral dna and envelope protein distribution represent unique features of median herpetic glossitis, which are not found in more common types of HSV infection.
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3/22. dermatitis, glossitis, stomatitis, cheilitis, anemia and weight loss: a classic presentation of pancreatic glucagonoma.

    Glucagonomas are rare tumors. They are predominantly located in the body or tail of the pancreas and display a constellation of signs and symptoms referred to as glucagonoma syndrome. The term necrolytic migratory erythema is used to characterize the distinctive rash associated with this syndrome. This report describes a classic presentation consisting of dermatitis, glossitis, stomatitis, angular cheilitis, anemia, and weight loss that was associated with the finding of a pancreatic mass and a markedly elevated plasma glucagon level. After pancreatic resection, the patient had complete resolution of the rash and normalization of plasma glucagon.
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4/22. taste disorder involving Hunter's glossitis following total gastrectomy.

    We treated five patients with Hunter's glossitis following total gastrectomy. The major complaints of the patients were taste disorder and abnormal glossal sensation. In all five cases, the patient's tongue was red and smooth, and laboratory testing showed the presence of macrocytic anemia and decreased serum concentration of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin). Gustometry was carried out in four cases and the results documented the presence of taste disorder. All five patients were treated by administration of vitamin B12, which led to improvements in the appearance of the tongue, the patients' subjective complaints and the results of taste testing. When patients present with a red, smooth tongue, Hunter's glossitis (which can easily be improved by administration of vitamin B12) should be considered in the differential diagnosis.
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5/22. Kaposi's sarcoma of the tongue associated with median rhomboid glossitis in a non-AIDS patient. A case report.

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) of the tongue is extremely rare in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of KS of the tongue associated with a median rhomboid glossitis. The main clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical features allowed the differential diagnosis.
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6/22. Granulomatous glossitis: a case report.

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with a complaint of lingual enlargement. Detection of non-caseous epithelioid granuloma on histopathological examination led to a diagnosis of a granulomatous glossitis. Extensive investigation for the presence of associated disorders yielded negative results. Metranidazole and clofazimine were totally ineffective and tetracycline led to a minimal improvement. No associated disorder was detected at a 4-year follow-up examination. The position of granulomatous glossitis within the spectrum of orofacial granulomatous conditions is discussed.
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7/22. Localized amyloid tumor of the tongue. A case report and review of the literature.

    Amyloid is usually deposited in the tongue, as a part of generalized amyloidosis. Isolated localized amyloidosis of the tongue is relatively rare. We report such a case which presented with glossodynia and glossopyrosis and was thought clinically to represent median rhomboid glossitis. Histologically the amyloid stained positively with congo-red giving green birefringence under polarized light, was not abolished after permanganate pretreatment and did not react immunohistochemically for amyloid A, beta 2 microglobulin and transthyretin.
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8/22. Rhomboid glossitis in atypical location: case report and differential diagnosis.

    Median rhomboid glossitis (MRG) is an uncommon benign abnormality of the tongue, most frequently affecting men. It is typically located around the midline of the dorsum of the tongue, anterior to the lingual "V", appearing as a reddish, rhomboid area, depapillated, flat maculate or mamillated and raised by 2 - 5 mm. This paper reports a case of rhomboid glossitis in a 61-year-old man who consulted for a painless raised lesion on the dorsum of the tongue, in left paramedial (not medial) location. Histopathological findings were compatible with rhomboid glossitis. Other diagnoses considered but ruled out on the basis of the clinical and histopathological findings were haemangioma, pyogenic granuloma, amyloidosis, granular cell tumour, and squamous cell carcinoma. This case confirms that rhomboid glossitis may occur in paramedial locations.
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9/22. Median rhomboid glossitis: secondary to colonisation of the tongue by actinomyces (a case report).

    Median rhomboid glossitis is an inflammatory lesion of the tongue, now believed to be secondary to candidiasis. We document a case of median rhomboid glossitis with heavy colonisation by actinomyces in a 60-year-old male. We propose that actinomyces, like candida, induces pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the mucosa of the tongue and florid inflammatory hyperplasia of the underlying connective tissue, resulting in the characteristic elevated lesion. actinomyces has not earlier been implicated as a cause of median rhomboid glossitis.
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10/22. Laboratory measurements of nutritional status as correlates of atrophic glossitis.

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a comprehensive laboratory assessment of nutritional status in two elderly patients selected for the presence of atrophic glossitis, a classic physical sign of malnutrition. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Inpatient internal medicine ward at the William S. Middleton Memorial veterans Medical Center, Madison, wisconsin. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: blood specimens were analyzed by the Nutrition Evaluation Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition research Center on aging at Tufts University. Both subjects had biochemical evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition and were deficient or marginally deficient in several vitamins and trace minerals. CONCLUSIONS: Much work needs to be done to determine the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the classic physical signs of malnutrition as predictors of low biochemical levels and adverse clinical outcomes. The presence of atrophic glossitis should prompt the clinician to consider a basic nutritional assessment.
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