Cases reported "Goat Diseases"

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1/2. Presumptive babesia ovis infection in a spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica).

    On December 29 1995, a 13-year old, male Spanish ibex was easily captured by hand, with depression, weakness and severe tick infestation, mainly in the periocular and auricular regions. Blood and serum samples were collected and haematological analysis and serum iron levels were determined. Red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were decreased and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) increased (macrocytic-hypochromic anemia). serum iron and transferrin saturation were decreased and total and unbound iron-binding capacity were increased. Piroplasms were observed within parasitized erythrocytes and presumptively identified as babesia spp. ticks were identified exclusively as Ripicephalus bursa. The animal was treated with imidocarb but died after 15 days of capture. Histopathological examination revealed congestion of pulmonary capillaries and spleen, glomerulonephritis, hemoglobinuric nephrosis and generalized hemosiderosis. An indirect fluorescent antibody test was performed using a babesia ovis isolate of ovine origin as antigen and the animal was positive with a titre of 1:640.
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keywords = tick
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2/2. Crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever virus infection in the western province of saudi arabia.

    In 1990, an outbreak of suspected viral haemorrhagic fever involving 7 individuals occurred in Mecca in the Western Province of saudi arabia. congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever (CCHF), not previously known to be present in saudi arabia, was incriminated. A study of the epidemiology of this virus was therefore carried out in Mecca, and in nearby Jeddah and Taif in 1991-1993; 13 species of ixodid ticks (5 Hyalomma spp., 5 rhipicephalus spp., 2 Amblyomma spp., 1 Boophilus sp.) were collected from livestock (camels, cattle, sheep, goats), and of these 10 were capable of transmitting CCHF. camels had the highest rate of tick infestation (97%), and H. dromedarii was the commonest tick (70%). Attempts to isolate virus from pools of H. dromedarii and H. anatolicum anatolicum were unsuccessful. The source of infection in 3 confirmed cases of CCHF was contact with fresh mutton and, in a suspected case, slaughtering sheep. An investigation in Mecca, which included a serological survey of abattoir workers, identified 40 human cases of confirmed or suspected CCHF between 1989 and 1990, with 12 fatalities. Significant risk factors included exposure to animal blood or tissue in abattoirs, but not tick bites. It is suspected that the CCHF virus may have been introduced to saudi arabia by infected ticks on imported sheep arriving at Jeddah seaport, and that it is now endemic in the Western Province.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tick
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