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1/6. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in india. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., capnocytophaga canimorsus and pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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2/6. Genital ulcer caused by human bite to the penis.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Human bite injuries, while less frequent than cat or dog bites, usually stem from aggressive behavior, sports, or sexual activity. It has been thought that human bites have a higher rate of infection than animal bites, but this view is likely skewed because of the frequency of closed fist injuries presenting to emergency rooms. Human bites to the genitalia also occur, but are not often reported because of embarrassment. GOAL OF THE STUDY: We report a genital ulceration after a human bite to the penis and review appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers. STUDY DESIGN: This article reports the development of a severe genital ulcer associated with a human bite to the penis secondarily infected, as verified by culture, with an oral flora organism eikenella corrodens. RESULTS: The genital ulceration healed after appropriate antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of human bites focuses on obtaining an accurate history and performing a salient physical examination, as well as early irrigation and debridement. Transmission of communicable disease should be considered as a possible consequence. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment and primary closure of wounds continue to be areas of controversy.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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3/6. capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis with purpura fulminans and symmetrical gangrene following a dog bite in a shelter employee.

    The authors describe a fatal case of purpura fulminans with symmetrical peripheral gangrene and sepsis caused by capnocytophaga canimorsus in a 45-year-old, previously healthy woman who was bitten by a dog at an animal shelter where she was employed. Absent in this patient were the usual risk factors, including immunosuppression, alcohol abuse, corticosteroid therapy, and splenectomy. The patient's presentation to the emergency room late in the course of the infection probably effected her death. C canimorsus should be strongly suspected in any case of septicemia following a dog bite. Prompt therapy may influence the potentially fatal course of systemic infection. Employees and/or volunteers who work in animal shelters should be cognizant of the potential risks of a dog or cat bite and follow recommended procedures when such an incident occurs.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = animal
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4/6. Polymicrobial bacteremia caused by escherichia coli, edwardsiella tarda, and shewanella putrefaciens.

    edwardsiella tarda, a member of enterobacteriaceae, is found in freshwater and marine environments and in animals living in these environments. This bacterium is primarily associated with gastrointestinal diseases, and has been isolated from stool specimens obtained from persons with or without clinical infectious diseases. shewanella putrefaciens, a saprophytic gram-negative rod, is rarely responsible for clinical syndromes in humans. Debilitated status and exposure to aquatic environments are the major predisposing factors for E. tarda or S. putrefaciens infection. A 61-year-old woman was febrile with diarrhea 8 hours after ingesting shark meat, and two sets of blood cultures grew escherichia coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens at the same time. She was successfully treated with antibiotics. We present this rare case of polymicrobial bacteremia caused by E. coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens without underlying disease, which is the first found in taiwan. This rare case of febrile diarrhea with consequent polymicrobial bacteremia emphasizes that attention should always be extended to these unusual pathogens.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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5/6. Penile ulcer from traumatic orogenital contact.

    Human bite injuries, although less frequent than animal bites, usually stem from aggressive behavior, sports participation, or sexual activity. Human genital bites and similar traumatic events also occur, but are infrequently reported because of embarrassment. A genital ulceration following mild trauma during oral-genital contact is reported and appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic interventions reviewed. The ulcer was infected, as verified by culture, with an aggressive oral flora organism, eikenella corrodens. The genital ulceration healed following appropriate antibiotic therapy. Treatment of human bites focuses on obtaining an accurate history and salient physical examination, as well as performing early irrigation and debridement. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment and primary closure of bite wounds remain areas of controversy. Because there is an inherent high risk of infection, genital human bite wounds (and similar traumatic events related to orogenital contact) should be managed with prophylactic antibiotic administration.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = animal
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6/6. capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteraemia demonstrated by a positive blood smear. A case report.

    The observation of bacteria in a peripheral blood smear was conducive to the diagnosis of capnocytophaga canimorsus septicaemia in a patient with no definite record of animal bites. Multiple rods were seen extracellularly and within the cytoplasm of neutrophils. The blood culture became positive after 18 h of incubation. disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) was manifest and infarction of the spleen was suspected. Direct examination of peripheral blood smears could be a valuable adjunct in the diagnosis of overwhelming bacteraemia.
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keywords = animal
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