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1/60. ochrobactrum anthropi bacteremia.

    ochrobactrum anthropi (O. anthropi ), formerly known as achromobacter CDC group Vd, is a gram-negative bacillus that is aerobic, oxidase producing, and nonlactose fermenting. This organism has been found in environmental and hospital water sources and has pathogenic potential in humans. Most reports in the literature of O. anthropi bacteremia are associated with intravenous line infections. We describe a case of bacteremia with O. anthropi in a 33-month-old boy with acute osteomyelitis. O. anthropi bacteremia also has been reported in immunocompromised hosts. Rarely, O. anthropi has been a cause of soft tissue or bone infection.
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2/60. Epidemiological investigation of ochrobactrum anthropi strains isolated from a haematology unit.

    ochrobactrum anthropi is an oxidase-producing gram-negative bacillus preferring aqueous environments. It is an opportunist of low pathogenicity with a wide and unpredictable antibiotic resistance. We observed bacteraemia caused by this organism in two immunocompromized patients hospitalized in the same haematology unit and catheter-associated sepsis was recognized within two days. Another isolate was obtained from the stools of a third patient of the same unit. Environmental investigations recovered an isolate from a tap-water sample of the unit. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of these four isolates and two others isolates previously found in the same ward, showed identical restriction patterns for the two blood isolates and confirmed that the two bacteraemia were epidemiologically related.
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3/60. stenotrophomonas maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant.

    Stenotrophomonas (xanthomonas) maltophilia is an aerobic, non-fermentative, gram-negative bacillus that is generally considered an opportunistic pathogen. Infections due to S. maltophilia have become increasingly important in the hospital environment. patients compromised by debilitating illnesses, surgical procedures or indwelling vascular catheters are most prone to S. maltophilia infections. To our knowledge, we report the first case of S. maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant of 31 weeks gestational age. Although the therapy of choice for severe infections caused by S. maltophilia remains to be decided, this patient was successfully treated by amikacin.
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4/60. chromobacterium violaceum infection in brazil. A case report.

    We report the second case of infection with chromobacterium violaceum that occurred in brazil. A farm worker living in the State of Sao Paulo presented fever and severe abdominal pain for four days. At hospitalization the patient was in a toxemic state and had a distended and painful abdomen. Chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral pneumonia and hypoechoic areas in the liver. The patient developed failure of multiple organs and died a few hours later. blood culture led to isolation of C. violaceum resistant to ampicillin and cephalosporins and sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracyclin, aminoglicosydes, and ciprofloxacin. autopsy revealed pulmonary microabscesses and multiple abscesses in the liver. The major features of this case are generally observed in infections by C. violaceum: rapid clinical course, multiple visceral abscesses, and high mortality. Because of the antimicrobial resistance profile of this Gram-negative bacillus, for appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy it is important to consider chromobacteriosis in the differential diagnosis of severe community infections in brazil.
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5/60. stenotrophomonas maltophilia endophthalmitis after intraocular lens implantation.

    BACKGROUND: stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic, gram-negative bacillus. endophthalmitis induced by S. maltophilia has been described in only two cases after intraocular lens implantation. We report S. maltophilia endophthalmitis in two patients with diabetes mellitus after intraocular lens implantation and compare the characteristics of the S. maltophilia-induced endophthalmitis with two previous cases. methods: A 68-year-old woman and a 74-year-old man with diabetes mellitus developed S. maltophilia endophthalmitis within 5 days of intraocular lens implantation. We performed intraocular lens removal and vitrectomy, which resolved the inflammation. No recurrences were found. RESULTS: Cultures grew S. maltophilia in both cases, and one of the organisms was multi-resistant. The final visual acuity was counting fingers and 0.3. The first case revealed a tractional retinal detachment during vitrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: S. maltophilia is a potential opportunistic intraocular pathogen, and the incidence of multiresistant S. maltophilia is increasing. S. maltophilia causes acute endophthalmitis, and its prognosis may not be poor unless the eye has a history of serious disease before the cataract surgery. The combined procedure of intraocular lens removal and vitrectomy was useful in resolving the inflammation and preventing recurrences.
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6/60. Infective endocarditis and septic embolization with ochrobactrum anthropi: case report and review of literature.

    ochrobactrum anthropi, previously known as CDC group Vd, is an aerobic, Gram-negative bacillus of low virulence that occasionally causes human infection. We describe a case of infective endocarditis with O. anthropi complicated by septic embolization. A review of all the literature reported cases of O. anthropi infection is presented and categorized into 'Central line related', 'Transplant related' and "Other pyogenic infections". mortality appears to be related to the underlying disease state, rather than the organism.
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7/60. stenotrophomonas maltophilia endocarditis of prosthetic aortic valve: report of a case and review of literature.

    stenotrophomonas maltophilia (previously known as xanthomonas maltophilia and pseudomonas maltophilia ) is an aerobic, nonfermenting, gram-negative bacillus, which has emerged as a serious nosocomial pathogen in patients with compromised immunity. It is a rare cause of endocarditis with only 20 cases previously reported in medical literature. The risk factors associated with S maltophilia endocarditis include intravenous drug abuse, dental treatment, previous cardiac surgery, and infected intravascular devices. S maltophilia is resistant to multiple antibiotics, which leads to frequent therapeutic failures. Although the optimal antibiotic treatment for S maltophilia endocarditis remains unknown, most of the patients received 2 or more antibiotics. We report a case of S maltophilia endocarditis of prosthetic aortic valve, associated with a painless aortic dissection, that responded well to a combination of ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. The literature is reviewed to elaborate the disease characteristics, the treatments used, and the prognosis of the S maltophilia endocarditis.
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8/60. capnocytophaga cynodegmi cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis in a diabetic man.

    capnocytophaga cynodegmi (formerly "DF-2 like organism"), a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity, is a capnophilic, gram-negative, facultative bacillus. C. cynodegmi has rarely been encountered in human diseases. We report the first known case of cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis caused by C. cynodegmi in a diabetic man from central india following a dog bite.
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9/60. Diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis in bacterial endocarditis.

    Renal involvement is common in patients with bacterial endocarditis. The most common bacteria are staphylococci and streptococci, and the commonest renal histopathological lesion is a diffuse proliferative and exudative type of glomerulonephritis. Very rarely, patients may present with an extensive glomerular epithelial crescent formation with a rapid deterioration in the renal function. This study reviews the published literature on diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis in bacterial endocarditis and reports a 24-year-old male patient with endocarditis due to Capnocytophagia species, a gramnegative facultative anaerobic bacillus, which normally inhabits the oral cavity. Appropriate antibiotic therapy is essential to eradicate the infection. A brief course of corticosteroid therapy may be helpful in those with deteriorating renal function. plasmapheresis may be useful in those with persistent hypocomplementemia, increased circulating immune complexes, and a progressive deterioration in the renal function. Removal of vegetation or valve replacement may be necessary. prognosis is generally good.
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10/60. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema associated with subcutaneous streptobacillus moniliformis abscess.

    We describe an 84-year-old woman who developed remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) associated with a subcutaneous abscess of the hand due to streptobacillus moniliformis. Polyarthritis and edema were relieved after therapy with corticosteroids. We review the association of RS3PE to different rheumatologic, neoplastic, or infectious diseases.
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keywords = bacillus
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