Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/15. Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds.

    In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in india. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., capnocytophaga canimorsus and pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/15. chorioamnionitis with intact membranes caused by capnocytophaga sputigena.

    We report a case of chorioamnionitis with intact membranes caused by capnocytophaga sputigena. The pregnant woman was hospitalised in preterm labor without fever, neither tenderness, just regular contractions. In spite of the tocolitic treatment the patient gave birth to a girl at 29 weeks' gestation, weighing 1220 g and transferred to intensive care. The newborn had clinical and biological signs of infections and was initially treated by ampicillin, cephalosporin and metronidazol. capnocytophaga sputigena was found on membranes, cord, amniotic fluid and placenta. It was also identified in maternal endocervix culture. Histologic findings showed a focal chorioamnionitis. This was the fourteenth reported case of infection due to capnocytophaga species occurring in pregnancy. All the cases are reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/15. Transcatheter embolization of mycotic aneurysm of the subclavian artery with metallic coils.

    Mycotic aneurysms of the subclavian artery are rare. This report describes an experience of 2 rare cases in which transcatheter embolization with metallic coils was performed for the management of these lesions alternative to surgery. Two patients who had been treated with chemotherapy for malignant neoplasms were diagnosed as having mycotic aneurysms of the left subclavian artery. The causes of these lesions were presumed to be the invasion of the arterial wall by the pulmonary abscess in case 1, and wound infection after placement of the reservoir for intraarterial chemotherapy in case 2. In both cases, proximal and distal sites of the aneurysm were embolized with metallic coils. In case 1, the vertebral artery was also embolized with Guglielmi detachable coils to avoid retrograde blood flow. Both aneurysms were completely occluded by a single embolization. In case 1, although weakness and paresthesia of the left hand remained, lethal hemoptysis due to aneurysmal fistulization to the lung parenchyma ceased. In case 2, no neurological deficit except for mild paresthesia in the left thumb had been observed. Both patients died of primary disease 10 and 5 months after the procedure. Transcatheter embolization is technically feasible and effective enough to treat the mycotic aneurysm of the subclavian artery even in the situation in which the surgical option seems to be difficult or risky.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/15. capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis presenting as an acute abdomen in an asplenic patient.

    Acute abdominal symptoms are frequently caused by surgical intra-abdominal problems. However, the differential diagnosis also includes several internal diseases. Overwhelming infections may present with acute abdominal signs, particularly in the immunocompromised host. Asplenic patients are highly susceptible to infections with encapsulated bacteria such as streptococcus pneumoniae, haemophilus influenzae and neisseria meningitidis. Severe infections due to capnocytophaga canimorsus (DF2), are also common in this group. C. canimorsus is a Gram-negative rod, present as a commensal organism in cat and dog saliva. We describe the atypical presentation of a fatal C. canimorsus-sepsis in a 46-year-old man, who underwent traumatic splenectomy two decades earlier.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/15. Co-infection of the human cornea with stenotrophomonas maltophilia and aspergillus fumigatus.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of corneal co-infection of stenotrophomonas maltophilia and aspergillus fumigatus. methods: We describe a culture and biopsy proven infectious keratitis with a large, brown, round anterior chamber mass attached to the endothelium. RESULTS: stenotrophomonas maltophilia was cultured from external scrapings of a corneal ulcer and septate hyphae were stained with Gomori's methenamine silver(GMS) stain along the wall of the excised intracameral mass. aspergillus fumigatus was cultured from the mass and pus pockets developed along the corneoscleral incision for removal of the mass. CONCLUSION: Co-infection of cornea with stenotrophomonas maltophilia and aspergillus fumigatus with existence of a large, brown, smooth-surfaced mass in the anterior chamber makes this case unique and interesting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/15. capnocytophaga spp. brain abscess in an immunocompetent host: problems in antimicrobial chemotherapy and literature review.

    The fourth case report of a brain abscess due to the fastidious Gram-negative organism capnocytophaga spp. is described and discussed on the grounds of clinical, microbiological, and therapeutic evidence. A probable origin from a cat bite and/or an underlying severe mandibulary granuloma is suspected. Due to lack of clinical and neuroradiological response to neurosurgery and a combination of imipenem-amikacin-clindamycin-fluconazole, second-line empiric llnezolid treatment proved rapidly successful, in the absence of further microbial isolations. in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing is often unpredictable for capnocytophaga spp., and agents usually active on Gram-positive organisms may also be effective, both in vitro and in vivo. Due to its favorable brain penetration and its dual mode of administration, linezolid may be an alternative option for patients with multiple risk factors, brain abscess of suspected polymicrobial origin, and lack of response to empiric or culture-driven therapeutic attempts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/15. achromobacter xylosoxidans endophthalmitis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction and gene sequencing.

    PURPOSE: To report a patient with achromobacter xylosoxidansendophthalmitis that was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction and gene sequencing. methods: Case report. A patient with culture-negative endophthalmitis underwent an anterior chamber tap. polymerase chain reaction was performed on the aqueous sample using the 16S ribosomal dna primer set to detect and amplify bacterial dna. The amplified dna was sequenced and compared to archived sequences in a gene library using the BLAST search program. RESULTS: A 214-base pair gene sequence was amplified and matched with the gene sequence for A. xylosoxidans. Antimicrobial treatment was instituted with resolution of hypopyon, anterior chamber cells, and vitreous cells one month after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: polymerase chain reaction of 16S rDNA combined with gene sequencing may be an alternative method of diagnosing culture-negative bacterial endophthalmitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/15. Percutaneous balloon pericardiotomy for the treatment of infected pericardial effusion with tamponade.

    Percutaneous balloon pericardiotomy has been used as an alternative for surgically created pericardial window mainly for the management of malignant pericardial effusions in critically ill patients. We describe a patient with purulent pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade who was treated successfully and without complications with percutaneous balloon pericardiotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/15. Systemic response to gram-positive and gram-negative infections--comparison and contrast.

    The concept of the systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) has recently been defined with suggested new terminology and criteria for diagnosis, and this has gained acceptance in the international literature. The importance of Gram-positive organisms as a cause of the SIRS has become increasingly recognised in recent years. This report describes a case of severe staphylococcal infection with a clinical picture similar to 'classic' endotoxic shock associated with Gram-negative organisms. We use this report to discuss the management of severe sepsis with organ dysfunction, outline the clinical complications and specific therapy of staphylococcal infections, discuss the new terminology, and compare and contrast the features of SIRS associated with varying causes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/15. Lemierre's syndrome.

    Lemierre's syndrome is an acute medical condition characterized by anaerobic oropharyngeal infection leading to septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. The illness is often complicated by septic pulmonary emboli and distant metastatic infections. Treatment consists of surgical drainage of purulent collections and long-term intravenous antibiotic therapy. Although Lemierre's syndrome is rare, it is potentially fatal and remains an important entity for clinicians to recognize and treat appropriately.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = rna
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.