Cases reported "Granular Cell Tumor"

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1/7. Pituicytomas, a mis-diagnosed benign tumor of the neurohypophysis: report of three cases.

    Pituicytoma is a rare benign primary tumor of the neurohypophysis, occurring in the sellar and suprasellar spaces. We report here three new cases with immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study. Particular attention was paid to the expression of some cell adhesion molecules. These tumors were characterized by bundles of elongated cells strongly immunoreactive to anti-vimentin, S-100 protein, neural cell adhesion molecule and neuron-specific enolase antibodies. glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was not recorded. It expressed the very late antigen alpha2 (VLAalpha2), but not VLAalpha5, and lacked epithelial markers expression (epithelial membrane antigen, E-cadherin), and specific neuronal markers (synaptophysin, chromogranin, neurofilament). Staining for pituitary hormones was negative. At the ultrastructural level, tumor/blood vessel basal lamina and cytoplasmic intermediate filaments were observed but desmosome or pericellular basal lamina were lacking. In one case few secretory granules were recorded. Differential diagnoses include granular cell tumors, pilocytic astrocytomas and spindle cell tumors such as solitary fibrous tumors, fibroblastic meningiomas and schwannomas. However, the unique pattern of antigenic expression and ultrastructural features of pituicytomas distinguish this rare tumor. As a subpopulation of pituicytes (which are distinctive glial cells of the neurophypophysis), some pituicytomas do not expressed GFAP. This suggests that pituicytomas presumably arise from pituicytes at various stages of their differentiation.
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keywords = schwann
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2/7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of peripheral nerve-sheath tumors.

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has allowed for the fine-needle aspiration and diagnosis of many different gastrointestinal neoplasms, including mesenchymal tumors. Although most mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), other mesenchymal tumors, including neural tumors, do occur. Proper diagnosis and differentiation of these tumors from GISTs are important because of their different prognoses and treatment regimens. We encountered three peripheral nerve-sheath tumors of the gastrointestinal tract aspirated by EUS (two schwannomas and a granular-cell tumor). We report on the endoscopic ultrasound, cytologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings of these cases.
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keywords = schwann
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3/7. The unique simultaneous occurrence of granular cell tumor, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Granular cell tumors are generally benign oncocytoid lesions of schwannian origin that are often incidental findings in many locations. gastrointestinal stromal tumors occur in older adults and express the c-Kit protein (CD117). Both of these tumors have been described in association with many other entities; however, they have never been reported to occur jointly. This report is prompted by the simultaneous appearance of 2 granular cell tumors, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and a gastric adenocarcinoma in a 65-year-old woman with a history of breast carcinoma and granular cell tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of these tumors occurring simultaneously.
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keywords = schwann
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4/7. granular cell tumor of the tongue in a 6-year-old girl--a case report.

    granular cell tumor is a relatively uncommon benign hamartomatous lesion occurring in almost any part of the body. The tongue and the buccal mucosa are common intra oral sites. Granular cell lesions may be found in other diverse sites such as the jaw, skin, gastro intestinal tract and respiratory tract. The histogenesis of the lesion still remains unknown. However, histochemical and ultra structural studies propose the origin of the lesion from schwann cells, striated muscle, mesenchymal cells, histiocytes and epithelial cells. The tumor generally occurs in middle or older aged adults. The lesion is typically seen as an uninflammed asymptomatic mass measuring about two cms in diameter with a yellowish surface coloration. As most of the granular cell tumors are benign, surgical excision of the lesion is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of granular cell tumor of the tongue in a 6 year old girl along with a brief review of literature on granular cell tumors.
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keywords = schwann cell, schwann
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5/7. Isolated cervical esophageal reconstruction for rare esophageal tumors.

    BACKGROUND: Isolated defects in the cervical esophagus in patients who have not undergone total laryngectomy are uncommon. We report 2 cases of rare esophageal tumors requiring reconstruction of the cervical esophagus after tumor resection. methods AND RESULTS: The patients were a 51-year-old woman with an esophageal granular cell tumor and a 54-year-old woman with an esophageal schwannoma. Both defects were reconstructed with a radial forearm flap. A small subclinical leak developed in 1 patient and healed spontaneously within 2 weeks. At 1 year and 2 years of follow-up, both patients were consuming a normal diet and had normal voices. CONCLUSIONS: A thin and well-vascularized flap such as the radial forearm flap is essential for reconstructing an isolated cervical esophageal defect so as to maximize functional outcome.
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6/7. Case report 676: Malignant granular cell tumor (schwannoma, myoblastoma), disseminated.

    A rare case of metastatic, lethal, malignant granular cell tumor is presented in a 77-year-old woman. Metastases involved numerous sites, including the skeleton. The key clinical and pathological findings and differential diagnosis in benign and malignant granular cell tumor were discussed, including a review from the English literature of 23 cases of malignant granular cell tumor. The differential diagnosis was considered in detail.
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keywords = schwann
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7/7. Malignant granular cell tumor: report of a case and review of the literature.

    The histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopic features of a rare malignant granular cell tumor (GCT) arising in the left radial nerve of a 54-year-old man are reported. Despite a lack of local recurrence following extirpation, the tumor metastasized to the skull five years later. light-microscopically, both primary and metastatic tumors consisted of markedly atypical or pleomorphic neoplastic cells with abundant cytoplasm containing diastase-resistant periodic acid Schiff reaction-positive granules. These tumor cells were arranged in a sheet-like pattern with mitotic figures including atypical ones, and were frequently immunopositive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen and c-MET, the c-met proto-oncogene product. These findings reflect high-grade malignancy of the present tumor. In addition, the tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and neuron-specific enolase. Ultrastructurally, a large number of intracytoplasmic granules featuring secondary lysosomes as well as long interdigitating cytoplasmic processes, intercellular intermediate junctions, discontinuous basal lamina-like structures, and stromal long-spacing collagen were observed. These findings indicated schwannian differentiation of the present tumor. In addition, based on a review of previously reported cases, the overall clinicopathological characteristics of malignant GCT were summarized.
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