Cases reported "Granuloma, Plasma Cell"

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1/35. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the spleen associated with a cavernous hemangioma diagnosed at intra-operative cytology: report of a case and review of literature.

    This report presents a case of a 40 year old Caucasian female with a 15 cm inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the spleen with associated areas of splenic hemangioma of the cavernous type. Abdominal CT showed a largely fatty splenic mass with enhancing septations, and scattered calcifications, and a small density in the liver. Grossly, the splenic lesion showed a lobulated cut surface with areas of myxoid change, necrosis, hemorrhage and cystic softening. The diagnosis of IPT was suggested at intraoperative consultation using cytologic smears and was, subsequently confirmed on permanent sections. Histologically, the lesion consisted of a densely collagenized spindle cell stroma with patchy aggregates of lymphocytes and plasma cells, and scattered foci showing hemosiderin-laden macrophages extracellular calcium deposits and osseous metaplasia. The stromal spindle cells were immuoreactive for smooth muscle actin and vimentin confirming their myofibroblastic phenotype. There were extensive areas of infarction within the mass. The patient, however, remained asymptomatic preoperatively. Histologic analysis in this case raises the possibility that low grade, perhaps repetitive, trauma to the hemangioma may have resulted in intralesional hemorrhages which, through a process of organization, may have evolved into this sizable inflammatory pseudotumor. In addition, this report reviews the current literature on the clinical significance and presentation, morphologic and immunohistochemical findings, prognosis, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapy of the splenic IPT.
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keywords = macrophage
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2/35. Intraosseous calcifying pseudotumor of the axis: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report and review of the literature. OBJECTIVE: To present the first case of intraosseous calcifying pseudotumor arising from the axis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Calcifying pseudotumor is a very rare disease. Only 24 cases have been previously reported. methods: A case of calcifying pseudotumor involving the body, dens, and laminae of the axis in a 60-year-old male patient was managed with total laminectomy of the axis and instrumented occipitocervical fusion, followed by the curettage of the body and dens of the axis and autogenous iliac bone graft. medical records, imaging studies, microscopic findings, and related literature are reviewed. RESULTS: Microscopic examination showed amorphous, basophilic, and chondroid calcifying masses surrounded with palisading histiocytes and foreign body-type giant cells. The findings were consistent with those of calcifying pseudotumors previously reported in other sites of the body. At 24 months after operation, a significant reduction of neck pain was achieved. But there was evidence of local recurrence of the lesion in the body and dens of the axis with a local progression of the preexisting lesion in the facet joints. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of intraosseous calcifying pseudotumor arising from the axis.
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ranking = 0.0065729880980995
keywords = bone
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3/35. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (inflammatory fibrosarcoma) of the bone.

    Although inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, originally described in the lung, have recently been recognized to occur in various sites, their origin in bone is exceptional. We present a case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, so-called inflammatory fibrosarcoma, of the bone. The tumor occurred in the iliac bone of a 70-year-old woman. Standard radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a destructive bone tumor that expanded into the soft tissue. Although the patient underwent excision of the hemi-iliac bone, multiple pulmonary metastases were noted 1 year after the operation. On histologic examination, the tumor was found to be composed of a sarcoma-like cellular area and a hypocellular fibrous area. Inflammatory cell infiltration into the tumor was a distinctive feature and is analogous with that of conventional inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor or inflammatory fibrosarcoma of the soft tissue. This is the first report to our knowledge of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bone with distant metastasis.
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ranking = 0.065729880980995
keywords = bone
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4/35. Long-term evaluation of a novel surgical approach to the pseudotumour of the ilium in haemophilia: exeresis and transposition of the omentum in the residual cavity.

    Pseudotumour of the ilium is a rare but severe complication in haemophiliacs. Excision is often complicated by infections, fistulation and extensive pelvic bone destruction. In 1978, the first author carried out excision of the pseudotumour with transposition of the omentum in the dead cavity to avoid recurrence. This type of surgery has been carried out in three additional patients. The long follow-up of these four patients suggests that this procedure is feasible and curative; local bleeding, infection and fistulation did not recur and the patients remained ambulant with the aid of appropriate devices.
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ranking = 0.0065729880980995
keywords = bone
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5/35. Injuries from palm tree thorn simulating tumoral or pseudotumoral bone lesions.

    Three cases of bone changes caused by foreign bodies that appeared to be tumoral lesions or pseudotumors, were observed in young male patients who presented with pain, localized inflammation, and radiographic and bone scan findings suggestive of tumoral or pseudotumoral lesions. Accurate diagnosis was made at surgery when the foreign body was retrieved. Following removal of the foreign body, postoperative recovery was satisfactory. The common causative agent in all these cases was a palm tree thorn.
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ranking = 0.039437928588597
keywords = bone
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6/35. Fatal instability following "odontoid sparing" transoral decompression of a periodontoid pseudotumour.

    Pseudotumour of the craniovertebral junction is an uncommon cause of high cervical myelopathy in the elderly. The anterior transoral approach is the preferred means of accessing these lesions. An "odontoid sparing" transoral approach, in which there is only minimal bone removal, is thought to preserve stability of the craniovertebral junction, obviating the need for posterior stabilisation. This report is of an 82 year old man who developed fatal atlanto-axial instability following an odontoid sparing transoral resection of a pseudotumour. This complication has not previously been described and its occurrence has important implications for the surgical management of this condition.
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ranking = 0.0065729880980995
keywords = bone
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7/35. Aggressive inflammatory pseudotumor of the abdomen 9 years after therapy for wilms tumor. A complication, coincidence, or association?

    BACKGROUND. Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a benign lesion that occurs in various organs and tissues. It is usually sharply demarcated from the surrounding tissue and surgery is considered to be the best treatment. methods. This article discusses a 15-year-old boy with an aggressive IPT of the abdomen occurring 9 years after therapy for wilms tumor. RESULTS. IPT widely involved the esophagus, stomach, and liver, producing severe dysphagia. Histologically, it showed classic features of IPT and, also, areas of metaplastic bone, a new feature recently described in the same lesion of the kidney. It mimicked malignant tumor clinically and led to extensive surgery, but early follow-up has shown no recurrence. CONCLUSION. Although many complications of surgery and chemotherapy are well known, the authors believe that it is unlikely to be the cause of IPT in the case presented. Therefore, the possibility of coincidence or association of wilms tumor and IPT remains open.
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ranking = 0.0065729880980995
keywords = bone
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8/35. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the kidney with extensive metaplastic bone.

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the kidney is a very rare lesion. We describe an 8-year-old boy with IPT of the kidney presenting as a single episode of hematuria. The case highlights a new feature, metaplastic bone, not previously described in IPT. This new feature may be helpful in establishing the correct preoperative and histopathologic diagnosis of IPT of kidney and avoiding inappropriately aggressive therapy. Despite its rarity, IPT of the kidney should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of a solitary renal mass.
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ranking = 0.032864940490498
keywords = bone
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9/35. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the temporal bone.

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the clinical presentation, imaging characteristics, intraoperative findings, and key histopathologic features of inflammatory pseudotumors of the temporal bone. Findings from an index case are presented, and the literature is reviewed for comparison. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: University tertiary referral center. patients: Cases were identified by review of surgical specimens from the temporal bone and lateral skull base with histopathologic confirmation. A single case was identified at our institution. Nine additional cases were identified in the literature; clinical features were reviewed. INTERVENTION: Of reported cases, treatment consisted of complete surgical excision in eight cases and subtotal excision in one. The index patient underwent surgical excision with postoperative corticosteroid therapy for adjacent meningeal involvement, after histopathologic interpretation. Corticosteroids were administered to one patient with residual microscopic tumor, and external beam radiotherapy was used for residual/recurrent disease in one case. RESULTS: The lesions were typically locally aggressive with extensive bony erosion. Three cases (33%) demonstrated labyrinthine and otic capsule involvement. Four cases (44%) involved the facial nerve. Characteristic histopathologic features included fibroblastic proliferation and a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in all cases. Mitotic figures, nuclear pleomorphism, and necrosis were rare or nonexistent. CONCLUSIONS: Inflammatory pseudotumors of the temporal bone are rare but aggressive lesions. Therapy should consist of surgical excision with steroids reserved for residual or intracranial disease or in patients in whom surgery is not an option. These lesions must be differentiated from other infectious, granulomatous, and neoplastic lesions on the basis of histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings.
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ranking = 0.046010916686697
keywords = bone
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10/35. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone.

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors include a diverse group of lesions characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration and variable fibrotic responses. Occurrence in the temporal bone is unusual. We present CT and MR imaging findings of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone in a 26-year-old patient with repeated paroxystic episodes of rotatory vertigo that occurred over a few days. CT and MR imaging revealed a homogeneously enhancing soft-tissue mass of the right mastoid with bone erosion of the tegmen and extensive dural thickening. The mass resembled a malignant tumor, and the patient underwent an extended mastoidectomy through a retroauricular approach. Microscopic examination showed myofibroblastic spindle cells with mixed inflammatory infiltrate, and the pathologic diagnosis was inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.
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ranking = 0.046010916686697
keywords = bone
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