Cases reported "Granuloma, Pyogenic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Bacillary angiomatosis affecting the oral cavity. Report of two cases and review.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is an infectious disease characterized by proliferative vascular lesions; it mainly affects HIV-positive patients. Multiple cutaneous nodular lesions together with fever, chills, malaise, anorexia, vomiting and headache are the most important clinical manifestations. It may also involve the heart, liver, spleen, bones, lung, muscles, lymph nodes, central nervous system and other organs. erythromycin, 500 mg four times a day, is the drug of choice. The importance of this lesion lies in its clinical and histological similarity with other diseases. Cutaneous and oral lesions of BA clinically resemble Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Histopathologically, BA may be confused with angiosarcoma, pyogenic granuloma and epithelioid hemangioma. We report two HIV-positive men with BA lesions in the oral mucosa. diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and Warthin-Starry silver staining.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Pyogenic granuloma of the sigmoid colon.

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a polypoid form of lobular capillary hemangioma that usually occurs in the skin and some mucosal surfaces. However, it is extremely rare in the intestinal tract and its preoperative diagnosis is difficult. We report on a case of PG of the sigmoid colon in a 62-year-old woman with a 6-month history of rectal bleeding. A pedunculated polypoid lesion was detected by colonoscopy and a polypectomy was performed. A microscopical study revealed a lobular arrangement proliferation of varying sizes of capillaries within an edematous stroma. A critical review of the English literature yielded only another well-documented case of PG in the large intestine. Diagnostic consideration includes inflammatory polyp and other vascular tumors such as bacillary angiomatosis and the angiomatous variant of Kaposi's sarcoma. Precise recognition of this distinctive vascular neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract is essential to avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. Localized bacillary angiomatosis in the oral cavity: observations about a neoplasm with atypical behavior. Description of a case and review of the literature.

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a rather frequent infectious pathology appearing mainly in the skin but can also affect the liver, spleen, heart, bones, lungs, muscles, central nervous system and other organs. The localization of the lesion in the oral cavity is rather rare, as it is evident in the literature. Bacillary angiomatosis can be clinically similar to the Kaposi's sarcoma and histologically confused with angiosarcoma, epitheloid hemangioma and pyogenic granuloma. A case of bacillary angiomatosis of the oral cavity in an immuno-competent patient is described. The high tendency to relapse, the capability in migration and to involve several localizations at the same time have induced the authors to deepen the research to exclude the possibility that it could be a Kaposi's sarcoma or a pyogenic granuloma and to get to an accurate diagnosis in order to resolve the disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Recurrent pyogenic granuloma with satellitosis--a localized variant of bacillary angiomatosis?

    A 27-year-old male patient had recurrent pyogenic granuloma with satellitosis. Histologically, Warthin-Starry staining of the lesions revealed clumps of dark bacilli as found in patients with bacillary angiomatosis. IgG antibodies against bartonella (Rochalimaea) henselae were elevated as shown by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The patient did not present an obvious risk for HIV infection or immunosuppression, and no antibodies against hiv-1 and hiv-2 were found. Recurrent pyogenic granuloma with satellitosis may be a localized variant of bacillary angiomatosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompetent child: the first reported case.

    Bacillary angiomatosis, an infectious process associated with Rochalima spp., was thought until recently to be restricted to HIV-infected or otherwise immunosuppressed patients. In 1993, bacillary angiomatosis was reported in several immunocompetent adults. An extensive literature review failed to find references to bacillary angiomatosis in immunocompetent children. We describe a 6-year-old female who presented with a single, rapidly growing, friable, erythematous papule on her neck. Histologic examination of a biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. The patient was otherwise healthy, and her physical examination was normal. Laboratory studies, including HIV serology, were normal. The patient was treated with six weeks of oral erythromycin without evidence of recurrence. We present and discuss the implications of the first case of bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompetent child.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Eruptive epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with spindle cells.

    A 39-year-old white man presented with four discrete dermal nodules in his right upper arm. biopsy revealed superficial dermal well-circumscribed nodules composed of solid areas and vascular spaces lined by epithelioid endothelial cells and a similar nodule composed of spindle and epithelioid cells. A moderate mitotic count of 3-4 mitoses/10 hpf was present. Multiple lesions erupted 1 month later distally and proximally to the original lesions. magnetic resonance imaging of the right arm demonstrated a lesion in the humerus. biopsy of the humerus showed a vascular tumor with similar histologic features to the overlying skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included epithelioid vascular tumors, bacillary angiomatosis, pyogenic granuloma, and Kaposi sarcoma. Vascular lesions containing epithelioid and spindle cells span a spectrum from benign to malignant. We believe these tumors belong in the category of hemangioendothelioma and propose the name eruptive epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with spindle cells. Our case emphasizes that eruptive cutaneous vascular lesions do not always suggest immunosuppression or malignancy. Additionally, it highlights the association between epithelioid vascular lesions of the skin and bone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = angiomatosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Granuloma, Pyogenic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.