Cases reported "Granuloma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/137. Coexistence of histoplasma granulomas and Warthin's tumor in the submaxillary salivary gland.

    A 49-year-old woman had a mass in the left submaxillary salivary gland that histologic examination showed to be a Warthin's tumor. In addition, there were multiple necrotizing and confluent granulomas that stained positive for histoplasma organisms using the Gomori methenamine silver stain. The histoplasma organisms in the lymphoid tissue with Warthin's tumor is an extrapulmonary manifestation of the disease which probably spread from the lungs via the lymphatics. The coexistence of the Warthin's tumor and the granulomas is a rare incidental finding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/137. Ultrasonic demonstration of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis.

    An ultrasound examination performed on a young woman with a long history of urinary tract infection demonstrated multiple subcapsular sonolucencies suggestive of multiple abscesses. The combination of the ultrasonic appearance, the clinical history, and a large nonfunctioning kidney with calculi on intravenous pyelography allowed us to suggest the diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Ultrasound plays an even greater role in patients who are allergic to iodinated contrast material in whom intravenous pyelograms and arteriograms may be contraindicated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 189.7341084189
keywords = pyelonephritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/137. Systemic bartonella henselae infection with hepatosplenic involvement.

    BACKGROUND: Systemic manifestations of bartonella henselae infection are rare in the immunocompetent host. The infection generally has initial symptoms of prolonged fever and multiple granulomatous lesions in liver and spleen. methods: Retrospective analysis of the records of all patients with hypoechogenic lesions in the liver and/or spleen diagnosed from 1990 through 1996 in three pediatric clinics in northern italy. RESULTS: Among the 13 patients reviewed, 9 had evidence of B. henselae infection and hepatosplenic involvement: five had prolonged and unexplained fever lasting from 3 to 16 weeks, and four had typical cat-scratch disease and peripheral lymphadenitis. All patients had increased sedimentation rate and normal aminotransferase serum activity. Five children had a liver biopsy, by laparotomy in three and by needle in two. In all, the predominant liver lesion was a necrotizing granuloma. All patients were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. fever lasted from 3 to 16 weeks, and hepatic and splenic lesions resolved in all with residual splenic calcification in one. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic B. henselae infection represents an important cause of inflammatory hypoechogenic hepatosplenic lesions in children. serology provides rapid diagnosis, avoiding multiple and invasive investigations. Hepatosplenic involvement can be found even in children with typical cat-scratch disease without apparent systemic manifestations. The frequency of liver and/or splenic involvement in cat-scratch disease is probably underestimated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/137. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with plaques.

    We report on the clinical and histopathologic findings of four patients who had asymptomatic, erythematous to violaceous plaques symmetrically distributed on the upper aspect of the thighs, lateral chest, and in two cases also on the abdomen and flexor surface of the elbows. All of the patients were women; two of them had arthritis, which in one case was associated with an autoimmune disorder, and another had autoimmune thyroiditis. Histopathologically, all cases showed similar changes consisting of an interstitial granulomatous dermatitis involving mostly the lower reticular dermis. histiocytes were the predominant cellular component, arranged interstitially and in small palisades around foci of degenerated collagen bundles in concert with large numbers of neutrophils and eosinophils. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis can present different clinical expressions, including linear cords, papules, and, as in our cases, plaques. This peculiar histopathologic pattern falls into the spectrum of cutaneous extravascular necrotizing granuloma, a condition that is often associated with systemic autoimmune disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/137. Scopulariopsosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis in an addict.

    Granulomatosis caused by fungal spores of a soil saprophyte is a newly recognized pulmonary complication of intravenous drug addiction. Brown, non-budding spores were histologically identified in necrotic tissue, inside giant cells of sarcoidlike granulomata, and in the vicinity of focal angiitic lesions. The fungus was identified by culture as the dematiaceous scopulariopsis brumptii. Cultural and histopathologic studies of lung biopsy specimens established the diagnosis. We showed precipitating antibodies to fungal antigen in the serum, prepared from the patient's isolate. Similar granulomatous pulmonary lesions were experimentally produced in mice by a single intravenous injection of spores of S. brumptii. The spores remained viable but did not show evidence of growth in the animal's tissue. Precipitating antibodies to fungal antigen and immediate wheal and late necrotizing type of skin reactions were shown in the challenged mice. The studies support the notion that pulmonary hypersensitivity to fungal spores was mediated by an Arthus'-type phenomenon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/137. Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis mimicking an intracranial neoplasm: clinicopathologic features and review of the literature.

    We present a unique case of biopsy-proven necrotizing sarcoidosis involving the central nervous system (CNS) in a 52-year-old woman. The patient presented with a 3-month history of left-sided headache and sharp, shooting pains on the left side of her face. She also has a previous history of sarcoidosis, histopathologically confirmed on parotid gland biopsy 24 years before. Imaging studies of the present lesion revealed a 1.8 x 1.4-cm mass in the left temporal lobe with signal intensity suggestive of meningioma or low-grade glial neoplasm. Surgical resection was initiated, and intraoperative consultation with frozen sections revealed granulomata. The lesion was biopsied, and surgical intervention was terminated. Permanent sections failed to reveal bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi, or foreign bodies. A diagnosis of necrotizing neurosarcoidosis was rendered. The patient was administered steroid therapy and clinically responded favorably. At the most recent follow-up almost 2 years later, there was no evidence of recurrence or progression. Necrotizing sarcoidosis has been reported most commonly in the lungs and rarely in other organ systems. We report the first histologically proven case involving the CNS as well as a rare example of sarcoidosis and necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis in the same patient. sarcoidosis and its necrotizing variant should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a granulomatous mass lesion involving the CNS, particularly in the context of a history of systemic disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/137. sarcoidosis and systemic vasculitis.

    BACKGROUND: systemic vasculitis is an unusual complication of sarcoidosis. Over a 10-year period, the authors have provided care for six patients who had features of both sarcoidosis and vasculitis. Vasculitis could not be attributed to other causes. OBJECTIVES: To report six patients (five children) who had sarcoidosis and systemic vasculitis and compare our experience with previous literature. To better delineate the clinical spectrum of sarcoid vasculitis and its response to therapy. methods: Retrospective analysis and a medline literature review of sarcoid and concurrent vasculitis from 1966. RESULTS: Our six patients had systemic illnesses that included fever, peripheral adenopathy, hilar adenopathy, rash, pulmonary parenchymal disease, musculoskeletal symptoms, and scleritis or iridocyclitis. Biopsies revealed features compatible with the diagnosis of sarcoidosis or necrotizing sarcoid granulomata in either skin, lymph node, lung, synovium, bone, bone marrow, liver, trachea, or sclera. Arteriography showed features of large vessel vasculitis in three patients, all of whom were African American, whereas patients with small vessel vasculitis were white. Prior reports of sarcoid and vasculitis included 14 adults, of whom half had predominantly small vessel disease, and half had medium- or large-sized vessel disease. Eight previously reported children included seven with primarily large vessel sarcoid vasculitis. Racial background was noted in 15 reported cases and included whites (6), african americans (5), and Asians (4). Among the authors' six patients, four improved when treated with prednisone alone. However, relapses occurred when the drug was tapered or withdrawn. CONCLUSIONS: sarcoidosis may be complicated by systemic vasculitis that can affect small- to large-caliber vessels. Sarcoid vasculitis can mimic hypersensitivity vasculitis, polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis, or Takayasu's arteritis. African American and Asian patients are disproportionately represented among cases with large vessel involvement. Corticosteroid and cytotoxic therapy is palliative for all forms of sarcoid vasculitis. However, relapses and morbidity from disease and treatment is common.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/137. Acute granulomatous interstitial nephritis and colitis in anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome associated with lamotrigine treatment.

    We present the case of a 17-year-old woman with a history of bipolar disorder, who developed a clinical syndrome manifested by fever, lymphadenopathy, skin rash, diarrhea, and acute renal failure requiring dialysis after the use of lamotrigine. Renal biopsy showed acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) with focal granulomas. Similarly, colonic biopsy specimens showed colitis and ileitis with non-necrotizing epithelioid granulomas. The patient had a complete recovery after withdrawal of the medication and steroid treatment. Although lamotrigine has been previously implicated in the development of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome, there have been no previous reports of acute granulomatous interstitial nephritis or colitis associated with the use of this drug.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/137. Granulomatous angiopanniculitis of the breast. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Granulomatous angiopanniculitis (GAP) is a rare benign condition of the breast of unknown etiology. Clinically and by fine needle examination, GAP may simulate breast carcinoma. The cytologic characteristics have not been described before. CASE: A 63-year-old female exhibited a palpable mass in her left breast. The fine needle aspirate contained both epithelioid and stromal elements. The epithelioid component consisted of dissociated individual cells and small groups and clusters of atypical cells. The stromal component showed a uniform, not-atypical pattern. The lumpectomy specimen showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous panniculitis and lymphoid angiitis without involvement of ducts or lobules. CONCLUSION: Granulomatous lesions should be borne in mind in the differential diagnosis of breast cancer in fine needle aspiration cytology. GAP must be histopathologically distinguished from granulomatous inflammation in the breast of autoimmune or infectious origin as specific medical therapy may be available for these latter diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/137. ANCA-associated necrotizing/granulomatous glomerulonephritis in an elderly patient; importance of the renal biopsy.

    ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis may present initially with renal symptoms, especially in elderly patients. We report a case of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis in an 80-year-old female presenting with renal insufficiency and proteinuria. There was no evidence of systemic illness at admission. The major finding in the renal biopsy was the presence of granulomas. Additional testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) was suggested. The ANCA test was positive confirming the diagnosis of ANCA-associated necrotizing/granulomatous glomerulonephritis. The patient responded well to adequate treatment with immunosuppressive therapy. This case demonstrates the importance of the renal biopsy in cases of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis presenting with renal symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = necrotizing
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Granuloma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.