Cases reported "Granuloma Inguinale"

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1/4. granuloma inguinale (donovanosis) presenting as a neck mass in an infant.

    A case of granuloma inguinale (GI) presenting as a lateral neck mass in a 4-month-old, hiv-positive infant is described. The histological features of the mass were typical of GI, with numerous macrophages containing intracellular organisms with a "closed-safety-pin" appearance. This is a rare occurrence, and the mode of transmission of infection is discussed. An awareness of GI in infants by both clinicians and pathologists is important to prevent morbidity and allow for prompt institution of appropriate treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
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2/4. Extragenital granuloma inguinale in North queensland.

    Two cases of extragenital granuloma inguinale are presented. A 41-year-old female presented with fever, a swollen knee joint and osteolytic lesions involving distal bones, and a 49-year-old male had multiple faecal fistulae in the lower abdomen with extensive involvement of pelvic organs. The diagnostic difficulties presented by such cases and the various types of extragenital pathology that have been described in this disease are discussed.
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ranking = 0.00042389730516976
keywords = bone
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3/4. granuloma inguinale (donovanosis): an unusual cause of otitis media and mastoiditis in children.

    granuloma inguinale (donovanosis) is seen predominantly in adults (it rarely occurs in children) and mainly affects genital skin and mucosa. infection occurs at other skin and mucosal sites, and hematogenous dissemination to bone also has been described. The infection responds dramatically to appropriate antibiotic treatment. We present two cases of granuloma inguinale occurring in children (8 months and 5 months of age) causing mastoiditis and external ear discharges. A temporal lobe abscess also developed in the 8-month-old child. Subsequent computed tomography scans showed marked improvement in the brain lesion after treatment. The second child had a polypoid mass in the middle ear that on biopsy showed the features of granuloma inguinale. The mother of this child had biopsy-proven granuloma inguinale of the uterine cervix. These cases indicate that granuloma inguinale can be transmitted during vaginal delivery, and careful cleansing of neonates born to infected mothers is recommended.
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ranking = 0.00042389730516976
keywords = bone
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4/4. Disseminated donovanosis (granuloma inguinale) causing spinal cord compression: case report and review of donovanosis involving bone.

    Donovanosis is a genital ulcer disease that occasionally has extragenital manifestations. This report describes a case of disseminated donovanosis in a 54-year-old woman from northern australia who had subsequent thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis and spinal cord compression. Malignancy and vertebral tuberculosis were the major differential diagnoses. The patient had no genital lesions at the time of diagnosis of extragenital donovanosis but had undergone a hysterectomy, thus raising the possibility of prior disease of the uterine cervix (most previous cases have been associated with primary cervical disease). Despite treatment with doxycycline, she had no significant neurological improvement. Donovanosis disseminated to bone has been reported in 18 cases in the last 55 years. awareness of donovanosis in the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and prompt pelvic examinations enabling early diagnosis of occult cervical disease are the most important measures in preventing morbidity and mortality due to disseminated donovanosis.
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ranking = 0.0021194865258488
keywords = bone
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