Cases reported "Graves Disease"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/144. Graves' disease induced by Na(131)I therapy for toxic multinodular goitre.

    A 59-year-old woman developed manifestations of Graves' disease several months after treatment with radioiodine (Na(131)) for toxic multinodular goitre. During subsequent treatment with additional radioiodine therapy Graves' ophthalmopathy developed which was severe and required treatment with prednisone and orbital radiotherapy. The literature on development of Graves' disease following Na(131) therapy is reviewed and possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. In this case, possibly the first radioiodine therapy has illicited Graves' thyrotoxicosis and the subsequently added radioiodine treatments for the persistent Graves' thyrotoxicosis led to serious ophthalmopathy. physicians should recognise Graves-like disease as a complication of Na(131)I therapy for toxic multinodular goitre and carefully consider the timing of consecutive radioiodine therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/144. Postpartum proptosis with ophthalmopathy.

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum thyroid disease presents in two forms: postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and postpartum Graves' disease (PPGD). CASE REPORT: A case of postpartum thyroid dysfunction with ophthalmopathy is presented. DISCUSSION: In women diagnosed with Graves' disease during the ages of 20 to 35 years, 66% have a postpartum onset; women with a previous history of Graves' disease frequently relapse in the postpartum period. Additionally, up to 25 to 30% of postpartum women can develop permanent hypothyroidism from postpartum thyroiditis. The signs and symptoms of PPT and PPGD may be indefinite after delivery and often go undiagnosed. Because complications can be significant and may become irreversible, proper diagnosis and timely treatment is important.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/144. Two cases of refractory endocrine ophthalmopathy successfully treated with extracorporeal immunoadsorption.

    Endocrine ophthalmopathy (EO) is a severe disease entity that is characterized by retrobulbar swelling due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans on an autoimmune basis. This disorder can lead to the loss of vision and often is resistant to conventional therapy. There is a relation to Graves' hyperthyroidism, but probably no close association. Two patients with severe EO that was resistant to usual therapeutic approaches including steroids and radiological and surgical measures underwent a 20 session course of intensive immunoadsorption therapy (Plasmaselect/Therasorb Anti-IgG) with a mean 2- to 3-fold plasma volume treated. After the first sessions, both patients voiced an impressive relief of their major symptoms, which was confirmed by ophthalmological investigation. Throughout the time of therapy until present, these patients have remained at their respective levels of improvement. We consider immunoadsorption an effective therapeutic opportunity in severe EO resistant to conventional treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/144. Thyroid carcinoma and Graves' disease.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe an unusual patient with thyroid carcinoma who had metastatic pulmonary nodules that regressed transiently during the active phase of Graves' disease. methods: The clinical, pathologic, and laboratory findings in a female patient with thyroid carcinoma, pulmonary lesions, and Graves' ophthalmopathy are presented. In addition, the patient's clinical course and results of serial studies are reviewed. RESULTS: A 62-year-old woman underwent excision of a follicular carcinoma of the thyroid and then total thyroidectomy in 1984. Two years later, chest radiography disclosed multiple pulmonary lesions; open-lung biopsy revealed follicular carcinoma. thyroglobulin determinations continued to increase, and computed tomography of the chest showed an increase in the size and number of pulmonary nodules. Clinically, the patient remained unchanged until 4 years postoperatively, when she noted rapid onset of diplopia, proptosis, and diminished visual acuity. During this time, a thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin assay was strongly positive, thyroglobulin levels were decreased, and computed tomography and radiography of the chest showed evidence of tumor regression. Orbital decompression partially restored vision, and the inflammatory signs decreased gradually. Concurrently, the thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level declined, the thyroglobulin level increased, and the pulmonary lesions increased in size and number. The patient ultimately died of metastatic disease. CONCLUSION: The reduction in size of the pulmonary nodules and decrease in thyroglobulin levels when the thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level was high and the regrowth of lesions when it declined suggest a causal relationship. The hypothesis of an operative autoimmune factor cannot be substantiated without serologic evidence in this case but should prompt physicians to search for other such occurrences.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/144. Orbital lymphoma misdiagnosed as Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of bilateral orbital lymphoma mistakenly diagnosed as Graves' ophthalmopathy. methods: We present a case report, with laboratory data and photographic documentation, and discuss the differential diagnosis in patients with orbital masses. RESULTS: A 65-year-old man with bilateral exophthalmos and substantial weight loss was referred to the Endocrine Clinic for evaluation of possible Graves' disease. A 6-cm mass was detected in the left axilla. biopsy of this mass revealed the histopathologic diagnosis of anaplastic B-cell lymphoma. Treatment with intrathecally administered methotrexate and orally administered dexamethasone promptly resulted in decreased proptosis. CONCLUSION: The most frequent cause of bilateral proptosis is Graves' ophthalmopathy, and when it is associated with weight loss in an elderly patient, the initial diagnostic consideration is thyrotoxic Graves' disease. This case should remind physicians that bilateral orbital lymphoma, although uncommon, may mimic Graves' ophthalmopathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/144. triiodothyronine-induced thyrotoxicosis in ophthalmic graves disease.

    A euthyroid woman with ophthalmic graves disease developed endogenous hyperthyroidism coincident with T3 suppression test. There is a putative role of liothyronine administration in precipitating or activating hyperthyroidism. Aberrancies in T3 suppression testing in graves disease occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.089245592357376
keywords = grave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/144. Evidence for thyrotropin receptor immunoreactivity in pretibial connective tissue from patients with thyroid-associated dermopathy.

    Pretibial myxedema (PTM), mainly characterized by the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue, is an extrathyroidal manifestation of autoimmune Graves' disease (GD), almost always associated with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). The thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R) has been proposed as the common target antigen in GD, GO and PTM, with evidence for receptor transcripts and/or protein in these locations. The aim of this study has been to investigate whether receptor protein is present in the pretibial tissues. skin biopsies were obtained from two patients with PTM and two normal subjects without thyroid disease. A portion of each sample was fixed to produce semi-thin sections for Toluidine Blue or periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. The remainder was snap frozen to generate cryostat sections for immunohistochemical analysis using three monoclonal antibodies against TSH-R. In the skin from the two patients suffering from PTM, the dermis was infiltrated by inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, B cells, macrophages, mast cells) and adipocytes. The collagen fibers were dissociated by edema and by the accumulation of a PAS-positive material. Immunodetection of TSH-R produced positive staining on cells localized in the dermis, beneath the epidermis or close to the hypodermis. These cells were elongated and resembled fibroblasts. No immunoreactivity was observed in the dermis from control patients without thyroid disease. In conclusion, we have evidence for TSH-R immunoreactivity in the pretibium of patients with GD, GO and PTM. Further studies are needed to unambiguously identify the positive cells and determine whether the reactivity is due to the receptor itself or to a cross-reacting protein.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5401534509685
keywords = ophthalmopathy, thyroid-associated
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/144. Minimal change nephropathy and graves' disease: report of a case and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a possible association between Graves' disease and nephrotic syndrome attributable to minimal change nephropathy and to review the literature related to renal diseases in patients with Graves' disease. methods: The clinical, laboratory, and renal biopsy findings in a patient with Graves' disease and minimal change nephropathy are discussed. In addition, the pertinent English-language literature published from 1966 to 2001, determined by means of a medline search, is reviewed. RESULTS: A 29-year-old woman underwent assessment by her primary-care physician because of palpitations, sweating, and a 4.5-kg weight loss. physical examination revealed a diffuse goiter and tremors of the extremities but no ophthalmologic signs. Laboratory tests confirmed a diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment was initiated with propylthiouracil and propranolol. Four weeks later, she presented to the University of Louisville Hospital with increasing swelling of her legs and periorbital puffiness. Examination revealed generalized edema, ascites, and pleural effusion. She continued to have features of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory tests showed undetectable thyroid-stimulating hormone (<0.03 mIU/mL) and homogeneously increased 123I thyroid uptake and scan. A 24-hour urine collection revealed urinary protein excretion of 6.75 g. Antinuclear antibodies, serum complement levels, hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) screen were normal. A kidney biopsy specimen revealed features consistent with minimal change disease on light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. The patient had an excellent clinical and laboratory response to treatment with radioactive iodine and corticosteroids, and she was asymptomatic at 6-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the concomitant occurrence of Graves' disease and minimal change disease in the absence of any other immunologic disorder known to be associated with minimal change nephropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.3569823694295
keywords = grave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/144. Late recurrence of unilateral graves orbitopathy on the contralateral side.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of late recurrence of unilateral Graves orbitopathy on the contralateral side after 7 years. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 44-year-old woman with left unilateral Graves orbitopathy underwent two-wall orbital decompression on the left side. After strabismus surgery and left upper eyelid surgery, she was discharged. RESULTS: Seven years after discharge, the patient developed Graves orbitopathy on the right side, and she underwent two-wall orbital decompression on the right side. CONCLUSION: At least in patients with unilateral Graves orbitopathy, late recurrence of the disease in the contralateral orbit may occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.3569823694295
keywords = grave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/144. Thymic hyperplasia presenting as anterior mediastinal mass in 2 patients with graves disease.

    graves disease is an autoimmune thyroid condition characterized by the production of autoantibodies against the thyrotropin receptor. The autoantibodies mimic the effect of the hormone on thyroid cells, which stimulates autonomous production of thyroxine and triiodothyronine. It has been hypothesized that cross-reactivity of autoantibodies may result in graves ophthalmopathy and dermopathy. A seldom-recognized feature of graves disease is thymic hyperplasia. We report 2 patients with graves disease and incidentally discovered anterior mediastinal masses presumed to be thymic hyperplasia. In both cases, these masses regressed spontaneously after treatment of hyperthyroidism.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ophthalmopathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Graves Disease'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.