Cases reported "HIV Infections"

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1/13. Bacillary angiomatosis by bartonella quintana in an hiv-infected patient.

    Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis are opportunistic infections caused by bartonella henselae and bartonella quintana, which occur in patients with late-stage infection. We report a case of bacillary angiomatosis in an hiv-infected patient with skin, bone, and probably liver involvement, The identification of the agent (B quintana ) was done by polymerase chain reaction in the skin specimen. The patient had complete regression of all lesions after a 6-month regimen of oral erythromycin.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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2/13. Molecular characterization of first human Bartonella strain isolated in italy.

    The aim of this study was to characterize a Bartonella strain (BA-1) isolated from a blood culture of an Italian, human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient with bacillary angiomatosis. We analyzed the isolate using molecular biology methods such as whole-cell fatty acid analysis, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, type-specific 16S rRNA PCRs, sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and arbitrarily primed PCR. The BA-1 isolate turned out to be a bartonella quintana strain, similar but not identical to B. quintana oklahoma, which was used as a control strain.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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3/13. Characterization of a novel Rochalimaea species, R. henselae sp. nov., isolated from blood of a febrile, human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient.

    Isolation of a Rochalimaea-like organism from a febrile patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus was confirmed. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease length polymorphism analysis of a portion of the citrate synthase gene, demonstrated that the agent is closely related to members of the genus Rochalimaea and that the isolate is genotypically identical to the presumptive etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis. However, the same genotypic analyses readily differentiated the new isolate from isolates of other recognized Rochalimaea species as well as other genera of bacteria previously suggested as putative etiologic agents of bacillary angiomatosis and related syndromes. We propose that the novel species be referred to as Rochalimaea henselae sp. now.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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4/13. Abdominal visceral peliosis associated with bacillary angiomatosis. Ultrastructural evidence of endothelial destruction by bacilli.

    Peliosis involving solid internal organs is a rare entity, and it has been reported in association with chronic debilitating diseases. Bacillary angiomatosis (BA), on the other hand, is a recently identified lesion found virtually only in individuals infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. We describe herein two cases of visceral BA and peliosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Based on light and electron microscopic findings, we conclude that (1) BA bacilli present in the hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, in a suitable host milieu, may be the causative agents of peliosis hepatis; (2) BA bacilli can be found both intracellularly and extracellularly; and (3) peliosis is also identified in association with BA in abdominal lymph nodes.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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5/13. Bacillary angiomatosis caused by bartonella quintana.

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a disorder of neovascular proliferation involving skin and lymph nodes of immunosuppressed patients. bartonella henselae or bartonella quintana have been inculpated as causative by direct culture or PCR amplification of dna sequences. Here, we report the clinical evolution of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) whose B. quintana infection was diagnosed by PCR.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = angiomatosis
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6/13. Epithelioid angiomatosis affecting the oral cavity as a first sign of hiv infection.

    Oral lesions are frequently the first manifestation of hiv infection and accurate diagnosis may be important in determining the management of individual patients. Lesions may be relatively common but non-specific, such as candidosis, or may be indicative of AIDS, such as Kaposi's sarcoma. Epithelioid angiomatosis is a recently described vascular lesion which may be clinically and histologically similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, but which is infective in origin. Usually it is a manifestation of AIDS and presents as multiple cutaneous lesions but has rarely been reported in the mouth. In this report a patient presented with lesions of epithelioid angiomatosis which were confined to the oral mucosa and which were associated with hiv infection, but not with AIDS. Differentiation from Kaposi's sarcoma is important, since epithelioid angiomatosis may be treated with antibiotics and a mistaken diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma may wrongly categorise an individual as having AIDS.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = angiomatosis
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7/13. The agent of bacillary angiomatosis. An approach to the identification of uncultured pathogens.

    BACKGROUND. Bacillary angiomatosis is an infectious disease causing proliferation of small blood vessels in the skin and visceral organs of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and other immunocompromised hosts. The agent is often visualized in tissue sections of lesions with Warthin-Starry staining, but the bacillus has not been successfully cultured or identified. This bacillus may also cause cat scratch disease. methods. In attempting to identify this organism, we used the polymerase chain reaction. We used oligonucleotide primers complementary to the 16S ribosomal rna genes of eubacteria to amplify 16S ribosomal gene fragments directly from tissue samples of bacillary angiomatosis. The dna sequence of these fragments was determined and analyzed for phylogenetic relatedness to other known organisms. Normal tissues were studied in parallel. RESULTS. Tissue from three unrelated patients with bacillary angiomatosis yielded a unique 16S gene sequence. A sequence obtained from a fourth patient with bacillary angiomatosis differed from the sequence found in the other three patients at only 4 of 241 base positions. No related 16S gene fragment was detected in the normal tissues. These 16S sequences associated with bacillary angiomatosis belong to a previously uncharacterized microorganism, most closely related to Rochalimaea quintana. CONCLUSIONS. The cause of bacillary angiomatosis is a previously uncharacterized rickettsia-like organism, closely related to R. quintana. This method for the identification of an uncultured pathogen may be applicable to other infectious diseases of unknown cause.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = angiomatosis
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8/13. Visceral bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis: possible manifestations of disseminated cat scratch disease in the immunocompromised host: a report of two cases.

    Opportunistic infection with the causative agent of cat scratch disease may be responsible for an unusual vascular proliferative lesion, referred to as bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis, previously described only in human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-infected patients. We present a case of an hiv-infected patient with bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis involving the liver and bone marrow causing progressive hepatic failure. We also report a case of a cardiac transplant recipient with hepatic and splenic bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis manifesting as a fever of unknown origin, a previously unreported event in a non-hiv-infected patient. These cases represent the first documentation of bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis with visualization of cat scratch-like organisms involving internal organs.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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9/13. Intra-abdominal mass associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage: a new manifestation of bacillary angiomatosis.

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a recently described vascular proliferative lesion that occurs most commonly in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Cutaneous lesions are the most frequently described manifestations of bacillary angiomatosis. However, as culture techniques and disease recognition have improved, additional manifestations have been identified in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, including bacillary peliosis hepatis and isolated bacteremia. Two species of the genus Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea), bartonella henselae or bartonella quintana, have been cultured from the cutaneous lesions of bacillary angiomatosis. A new manifestation of Bartonella infection is reported: an intra-abdominal mass presenting with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection. B. quintana was cultured from a percutaneous needle-biopsy specimen obtained from the highly vascularized intra-abdominal mass. The bacillary angiomatosis lesion resolved after 3 months of tetracycline treatment. Recognition of Bartonella infection is extremely important because it is readily treatable with antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = angiomatosis
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10/13. Bacillary angiomatosis in hiv-infected patients: report of three cases with different clinical courses and identification of Rochalimaea quintana as the aetiological agent.

    Three cases of cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis in hiv-infected patients are reported. They differed profoundly with respect to the extent of the lesions and the clinical course. In two cases, Rochalimaea quintana was identified by direct sequencing of the dna amplified with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whereas an easy, rapid method based on the restriction length of polymorphism analysis of PCR products (PCR-RFLP) was used in the third case. This report illustrates the variations in clinical presentations and evolutive profiles in patients with bacillary angiomatosis, and confirms the causal role of R. quintana in this disease.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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