Cases reported "HIV Infections"

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1/7. A case of strongyloides stercoralis and mesenteric tuberculous infection with acute abdominal pain in an HIV-positive patient.

    We describe an HIV-positive female patient who had acute abdominal pain as the initial presentation of strongyloides stercoralis infection. The diagnosis was established by identifying rhabditiform larvae in stool. She also had intra-abdominal tuberculosis without intestinal perforation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such a presentation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
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2/7. strongyloides stercoralis infection as a cause of acute granulomatous appendicitis in an HIV-positive patient in Athens, greece.

    A case of acute granulomatous appendicitis due to strongyloides stercoralis infection in an HIV-positive patient is described. To our knowledge this is the first case presented in the literature.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
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3/7. diagnosis of strongyloides stercoralis in a peritoneal effusion from an HIV-seropositive man. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasite in humans with free-living and autoinfective cycles, is often an asymptomatic infection of the upper small intestine. If the host becomes immunocompromised, autoinfection may increase the intestinal worm burden and lead to disseminated strongyloidiasis. The parthenogenetic adult female larvae can remain embedded in the mucosa of the small intestine for years, producing eggs that develop into either rhabditiform, noninfective larvae or filariform, infective larvae. Manifestations of dissemination occur when the filariform larvae penetrate the intestinal wall and migrate into the blood. Pulmonary involvement is common, and the central nervous system may be affected. blood eosinophilia is typical, and gram-negative sepsis from enteric bacteria may occur. Much less commonly described is invasion of the peritoneal cavity with peritoneal effusion. CASE: A 49-year-old man who came to the united states from liberia 4 years earlier presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal distention, generalized weakness and marked pedal edema. Diagnostic paracentesis showed numerous filariform larvae of S stercoralis. Stool examination confirmed the presence of both rhabditiform and filariform larvae. Subsequently the patient was found to be HIV seropositive, with a CD4 lymphocyte count of 59. CONCLUSION: Early detection of S stercoralis may alter the often-fatal course of infection. The present case is the second reported one in the English-language literature of the diagnosis of S stercoralis in ascitic fluid.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = stercoralis
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4/7. Atypical gastric presentation of strongyloidiasis in HIV-infected patient--case report.

    strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal helminth of systemic distribution, which, once in its host, has the ability to perpetuate itself through an autoinfection cycle, leading to chronic infection. In healthy hosts, the parasite usually does not cause any symptoms, or only mild symptoms that are limited mainly to the small intestine. However, in immunocompromised hosts, uncontrolled multiplication with massive infection may occur, causing hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis, which are both associated with high morbidity and mortality. There are few reports of gastric involvement, particularly presenting as ulcer in the stomach. We report a case of gastric ulcer caused by S. stercoralis in HIV-infected patient.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = stercoralis
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5/7. Dissemination of strongyloides stercoralis as an immune restoration phenomenon in an hiv-1-infected man on antiretroviral therapy.

    We present a case of strongyloides stercoralis infection in an HIV-infected man, resulting in escherichia coli meningitis after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Recent evidence from studies of strongyloides development supports the concept that strongyloides dissemination in this case is an example of an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.
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ranking = 1.352404165957
keywords = stercoralis, strongyloides
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6/7. streptococcus bovis bacteremia and meningitis associated with strongyloides stercoralis colitis in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    We present a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection complicated by streptococcus bovis meningitis and bacteremia and severe strongyloides stercoralis colitis. The association between S. bovis infection and strongyloidiasis has not been described previously. This case highlights the importance of searching for larvae of S. stercoralis as part of the evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract of patients with bacteremia or meningitis due to certain enteric organisms. The role of HIV infection in the development of severe S. stercoralis colitis in association with S. bovis bacteremia and meningitis is unclear.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = stercoralis
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7/7. Disseminated strongyloides stercoralis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. treatment failure and a review of the literature.

    We describe a North American human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient with strongyloides stercoralis infection of the gastrointestinal tract, who required repeated "standard" courses of thiabendazole. Pulmonary infection with numerous roundworms developed, as suspected by bronchoalveolar lavage, and while he was receiving therapy, dissemination occurred. On autopsy, S stercoralis was recovered in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, and heart. After a literature review, we conclude that HIV-positive patients have a higher risk of dissemination and "standard" treatment failure. This may occur without elevation of IgE or eosinophilia. Those patients may require prolonged courses of thiabendazole or alternatively ivermectin therapy.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = stercoralis
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