Cases reported "HIV Seropositivity"

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1/13. Bacillary angiomatosis affecting the oral cavity. Report of two cases and review.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is an infectious disease characterized by proliferative vascular lesions; it mainly affects hiv-positive patients. Multiple cutaneous nodular lesions together with fever, chills, malaise, anorexia, vomiting and headache are the most important clinical manifestations. It may also involve the heart, liver, spleen, bones, lung, muscles, lymph nodes, central nervous system and other organs. erythromycin, 500 mg four times a day, is the drug of choice. The importance of this lesion lies in its clinical and histological similarity with other diseases. Cutaneous and oral lesions of BA clinically resemble Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Histopathologically, BA may be confused with angiosarcoma, pyogenic granuloma and epithelioid hemangioma. We report two hiv-positive men with BA lesions in the oral mucosa. diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and Warthin-Starry silver staining.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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2/13. Infection-associated vascular lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    Several reports have recently appeared in the literature describing "unique" non-neoplastic vascular lesions in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These lesions may be mistaken clinically and histologically for Kaposi's sarcoma. The terms epithelioid angiomatosis, epithelioid or histiocytoid hemangioma, and pyogenic granuloma have all been used to describe a similar entity in which cat scratch disease bacillus (CSDB) was subsequently identified. Lesions closely resembling this entity occur in patients with bartonellosis. We report a case of a cutaneous vascular lesion on the hand of an AIDS patient in which cytomegalovirus (CMV) and organisms consistent with CSDB were both found. Simultaneous infections with CMV and CSDB have not been previously described. The presence of these organisms in and around endothelial cells may provide the common stimulus for the formation of these reactive vascular proliferations.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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3/13. AIDS-related angiomatosis.

    We report multifocal cutaneous and mucosal vascular proliferations with the clinical and histological features of lobular capillary hemangioma and histiocytoid hemangioma in a 32-year-old acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient. The lesions resolved subsequent to erythromycin therapy.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = angiomatosis
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4/13. Bacillary angiomatosis with cutaneous and oral lesions in an hiv-infected patient from the U.K.

    We describe an hiv positive patient with histologically confirmed cutaneous and oral lesions of bacillary angiomatosis, an unusual clinical presentation. As far as we are aware, this is the first reported case of cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis in the U.K.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = angiomatosis
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5/13. Rochalimaea antibodies in hiv-associated neurologic disease.

    Rochalimaea henselae, a recently described pathogen thought to cause syndromes as varied as bacillary angiomatosis, parenchymal bacillary peliosis, fever with bacteremia, and cat-scratch disease, is associated with CNS diseases including cerebral and retinal bacillary angiomatosis, as well as cat-scratch-related encephalitis, myelitis, cerebral arteritis, and retinitis. We used a newly developed enzyme immunoassay and the polymerase chain reaction to investigate the association of R henselae infection with hiv-related CNS disease and found that whereas seroprevalence rates in hiv-positive patients unselected for neurologic disease were 4% to 5.5%, those with neurologic disease had seroprevalence rates of 32%. The ratio of organism-specific antibodies in CSF compared with serum suggested intra-blood-brain-barrier synthesis of these antibodies. CSF specimens containing only R henselae IgM had 16S rDNA specific for R henselae. Stored serum from one of these patients indicated he had developed R henselae-reactive IgM antibodies 10 months prior to the onset of neurologic disease. In the 14 patients for whom clinical data were available, evidence of CNS invasion by R henselae was accompanied by acute and subacute mental status changes including hallucinations, disorientation, and rapidly progressive dementia.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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6/13. Rochalimaea henselae infection. A new zoonosis with the domestic cat as reservoir.

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the reservoir and vector(s) for Rochalimaea henselae, a causative agent of bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and cat scratch disease, and to estimate the percentage of domestic cats with R henselae bacteremia in the Greater san francisco Bay Region of Northern california. DESIGN--Hospital-based survey of patients diagnosed with BA who also had significant exposure to at least one pet cat, as well as a convenience sampling of pet or impounded cats for prevalence of Rochalimaea bacteremia. SETTING--Community and university hospitals and clinics; veterinary clinics treating privately owned or impounded cats. patients--patients with or without human immunodeficiency virus infection, with biopsy-confirmed BA, who had prolonged exposure to pet cats prior to developing BA. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cultures and laboratory studies were performed on blood drawn from pet cats associated with patients with BA. The Rochalimaea species infecting pet cats and fleas and causing the BA lesions in human contacts of these cats was identified by culture, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and dna sequencing. The presence of R henselae bacteremia in pet cats was documented, and predictor variables for culture positivity were evaluated. RESULTS--Four patients diagnosed with BA who had prolonged contact with seven pet cats were identified. The Rochalimaea species causing BA lesions in these patients was determined to be R henselae. The seven pet cats were found to be bacteremic with R henselae; this bacterium was also detected in fleas taken from an infected cat by both direct culture and polymerase chain reaction. Blood samples were cultured from pet and impounded cats (N = 61) in the Greater san francisco Bay Region, and R henselae was isolated from 41% (25/61) of these cats. CONCLUSION--We have documented that the domestic cat serves as a major persistent reservoir for R henselae, with prolonged, asymptomatic bacteremia from which humans, especially the immunocompromised, may acquire potentially serious infections. Antibiotic treatment of infected cats and control of flea infestation are potential strategies for decreasing human exposure to R henselae.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = angiomatosis
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7/13. Fine needle aspiration diagnosis of intramuscular bacillary angiomatosis. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a localized infectious process that affects primarily patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The microorganisms implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease belong to the rickettsiaceae family. CASE: A 43-year-old, human immunodeficiency syndrome-positive male presented with diffuse swelling in the right deltoid area. A neoplastic process was considered in the differential diagnosis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy showed proliferation of blood vessels lined with plump endothelial cells, and the interstitial space was occupied by neutrophilic infiltrate, leukocytoclastic debris and clumps of characteristic amphophilic, granular material. Warthin-Starry stain demonstrated clusters of bacilli diagnostic of bacillary angiomatosis. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of this entity, made by fine needle aspiration cytology (as the only diagnostic procedure), was instrumental in preventing further surgical manipulation and in initiating appropriate and immediate antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = angiomatosis
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8/13. Widespread cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis and a large fungating mass in an hiv-positive man.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA), an infection caused by a gram-negative rod, can be a multiorgan disease. The usual causative organism, Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea) hensalae, has only recently been identified. bartonella quintana has also been shown to cause some cases of cutaneous BA. We describe a patient with widespread cutaneous BA with probable bone involvement and a large fungating mass.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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9/13. Kaposi's sarcoma versus bacillary angiomatosis.

    persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are subject to a host of pathologic entities secondary to a depressed immune system. Kaposi's sarcoma frequently presents in this immunocompromised population and, therefore, diagnosis seems clinically straightforward. However, because of the prevalence of a strikingly similar infectious disease known as bacillary angiomatosis, skin biopsy of one or more lesions is crucial.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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10/13. bartonella infections and hiv disease.

    Successful assessment and treatment of Bartonella in hiv-seropositive people depends on nursing's fundamental role in the management of these bacterial infections. Bartonella species are responsible for a variety of infections, including cat scratch disease and bacillary angiomatosis, which can be debilitating to people living with AIDS. This paper provides an overview of the clinical presentation and nursing management of Bartonella infection in PLWAs. The author discusses common diagnostic procedures, treatment strategies, and the nurse's role in caring for patients with a Bartonella infection.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = angiomatosis
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