Cases reported "Halitosis"

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1/5. halitosis: a delayed complication of splenectomy.

    subphrenic abscess is a recognised complication of splenectomy, but fistulation into the stomach is extremely rare. This report describes a delayed complication of splenectomy presenting as offensive and socially disabling halitosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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2/5. Tonsillolith as a halitosis-inducing factor.

    halitosis, or bad breath, is a common concern for many people. The main causes are known to be periodontal disease and tongue coating. We present a case of an incidental tonsillolith occurrence, which was a halitosis-inducing factor. Our results show that tonsilloliths should be considered as a possible cause of halitosis.
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ranking = 1.7431417821804
keywords = dental
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3/5. periodontitis as a manifestation of chronic benign neutropenia.

    BACKGROUND: A subcategory of chronic neutropenia is chronic benign neutropenia, which is characterized by a prolonged non-cyclic neutropenia as the sole abnormality, with no underlying disease to which the neutropenia can be attributed. Chronic neutropenia is defined as a low absolute neutrophil count for >6 months. In this presentation, periodontitis seems to be the sole manifestation of a juvenile patient with chronic benign neutropenia. A 7-year-old white male presented with periodontitis of the primary dentition and early tooth loss. His medical and dental history was otherwise unremarkable. Suspecting some systemic illness as the underlying cause, the patient was referred for a medical consultation and a series of blood tests. methods: blood analyses included a complete blood count (CBC), sequential multiple analyzer 24 (SMA 24), glycated hemoglobin levels, and screening for anti-white blood cell antibodies. blood levels of calcium, vitamin d, dihydroxyvitamin-D, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were also measured. liver function tests were performed. RESULTS: Following analysis of recent and previous blood test results, a diagnosis of chronic benign neutropenia was assigned. The patient's periodontal condition was treated with scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, and antimicrobial mouthrinses. Three-month recall visits were recommended as a follow-up protocol. CONCLUSIONS: This case represents the importance of diagnosing periodontal disease as a possible indicator of underlying systemic disease. When a patient presents with an unusual, generalized form of periodontal disease, screening for systemic disorders is required, as the oral condition may be the first or only manifestation of a systemic abnormality. This case also illustrates the reason for the change in classification of such a condition to periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease. This condition was previously classified as prepubertal periodontitis, a disease diagnosis that focused on the patient's age at the onset of the disease rather than the etiology.
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ranking = 1.7431417821804
keywords = dental
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4/5. Delayed halitosis-a rare cause.

    A 38-year-old tuberculous male Pakistani presented with halitosis and a cough especially marked when lying on his left side. barium swallow demonstrated a fistula between oesophagus and left main bronchus. Anti-tuberculous therapy and repeated cauterization failed to close the fistula. thoracotomy confirmed a congenital oesophago-bronchial fistula. Division and suture resulted in cure.
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ranking = 3
keywords = fistula
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5/5. Faecaloid breath heralding secondary aorto-enteric fistula.

    A patient underwent simultaneous abdominal aortic prosthetic replacement and resection of a meckel diverticulum. He then developed faecaloid breath. Later reoperation for aorto-enteric fistula cured halitosis. We conclude in retrospect that faecaloid breath may herald a secondary aorto-enteric fistula. A pathophysiological mechanism is suggested and discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fistula
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