Cases reported "Hand Dermatoses"

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1/7. onychomycosis in a diabetic patient due to trichophyton gallinae.

    A 67-year-old female suffering from diabetes mellitus type I revealed brownish-yellow discolouration, subungual hyperkeratosis, and onychodystrophy of several finger nails. Upon culturing of nail specimens, trichophyton gallinae could be repeatedly identified on Sabouraud glucose agar. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human infection caused by this species in germany. T. gallinae is a zoophilic dermatophyte that primarily infects higher animals, but can also be transmitted to humans sporadically. Herein, clinical, diagnostic, and epidemiological aspects of this zoophilic dermatophyte are briefly reviewed.
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2/7. erysipeloid--case report.

    erysipeloid is an acute, bacterial infection of traumatized skin in an individual who was in direct contact with meat or other animal products contaminated with a gram-positive bacillus erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. We present a case of a 50-year-old housewife whose hobby was fishing, with a reddish, tender patch on the fifth finger and dorsum of the left hand, which developed a week after she had sustained an injury while boning the fish. The patient was treated with orally administered penicillin v 1,500,000 IU t.i.d. for 7 days, with complete resolution.
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3/7. Human orf. A diagnostic consideration?

    We saw four unrelated cases of human orf infection over a 3-month period. Each patient had a clear-cut history of contact with sheep and developed a characteristic painful pustular lesion on the hand. There were no significant systemic symptoms. Examination of an aspirate by electron microscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The lesions resolved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Human orf infection occurs in north america, and although seldom reported, it should be considered in the diagnosis of cutaneous lesions in patients who have exposure to animals associated with it.
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4/7. Contact allergy to furazolidone.

    A case of occupational contact allergy to furazolidone, used as an animal feed additive and as an antimicrobial drug in veterinary medicine, is described. The patient did not react to furazolidone 2% pet. Using PEG-400 and alcohol as patch test vehicles resulted in positive patch test reactions. No cross-reactions were observed to other nitrofuran derivatives (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin) or to furfural. The literature on contact allergy to nitrofurans is reviewed.
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5/7. Farmyard pox: parapox virus infection in man.

    Inasmuch as orf, milker's nodules and bovine papular stomatitis pox are clinically identical in man and are induced by currently indistinguishable parapox viruses, we propose a new generic term 'farmyard pox' for these diseases. This affords the clinician a diagnosis based on a common set of clinical and electron microscopic findings rather than one based on an uncertain or even misleading history. A case in point is reported in which the history failed to reveal a specific animal source of the virus, but electron microscopy confirmed the presence of parapox infection.
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6/7. Protothecosis.

    We have reported the 22nd case in the literature of protothecosis, a rare disease of man and animals due to infection with non-chlorophyll-producing algae of the genus prototheca. The skin is most often affected, but generalized, disseminated involvement has been reported. infection is usually severe and may be fatal. amphotericin b in combination with tetracycline is the treatment of choice.
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7/7. The sensitizing capacity of alstroemeria cultivars in man and guinea pig. Remarks on the occurrence, quantity and irritant and sensitizing potency of their constituents tuliposide A and tulipalin A (alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone).

    dermatitis in 8 female nursery workers handling alstroemeria ligtu cultivars has been proven/proved in 6 cases to be of allergic origin. Epicutaneous tests with cut flower extracts as well as with the isolated and purified sensitizer were positive. Successful animal experiments corroborated the sensitising capacity of alstroemeria cultivars. The responsible but unstable contact allergen, alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone (tulipalin A), was found in short ether extracts of flower petals in concentrations up to 18%. Due to its instability, subsequent extractions were performed with methanol, yielding the sensitising constituent after purification in the glucosidic form (tuliposide A). This could be stored at room temperature for longer periods without loss of activity. Tuliposide A was determined in specimens of alstroemeria ligtu cultivars of 14 different origins of various colours; its content varied between 1 and 2%. Direct testing of the plant material in human patients carries the risk of false positive reactions and active sensitisation, as the threshold for both forms of the allergen is very high. Only a concentration of 0.01% can be considered safe.
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