Cases reported "Hand Dermatoses"

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1/8. tinea manuum bullosa.

    We report a case of tinea manuum bullosa in a 36-year-old male, a crop and livestock farmer by trade. The lesion, resembling contact dermatitis, was located in the palm of the right hand. We isolated trichophyton verrucosum. No other skin lesion was detected. blood chemistry and immunology test results were normal. Treatment with terbinafine 250 mg day(-1) led to clinical and mycological healing.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bullosa
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2/8. A case of mixed bullous disease of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and linear iga bullous dermatosis.

    A 75-year-old Japanese male visited us with bullous eruptions on the extremities. physical examination revealed large bullae on the hands, lower legs and feet. The oral mucosa was also involved. histology disclosed subepidermal blister with inflammatory cell infiltrates in the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence showed deposits of IgG and IgA at the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence on 1 M NaCl-split human skin sections demonstrated that the patient's IgG antibodies reacted with the dermal side of the split, while IgA antibodies reacted with the epidermal side. immunoblotting showed that the patient's serum reacted with the NC1 domain of type VII collagen (290-kDa epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen) as well as the 120-kDa linear iga bullous dermatosis antigen, LAD-1. Systemic prednisolone resulted in a favorable response. From the clinicopathological findings, the present case is not consistent with either epidermolysis bullosa acquisita or IgA bullous dermatosis. Therefore, we regarded the case as mixed bullous disease of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and linear iga bullous dermatosis. Such a case has not been previously reported.
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ranking = 114.41806692682
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullosa acquisita, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, acquisita, bullosa
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3/8. Bazex syndrome (acrokeratosis paraneoplastica). An analytic review.

    Bazex syndrome (acrokeratosis paraneoplastica) is characterized by a psoriasiform eruption that favors acral sites and has been associated with an underlying malignancy in all reported cases. Of the 93 patients in this series, 89 were male with a mean age of 60 /- 8.5 years. Squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and squamous cell tumors of unknown primary with cervical lymph node metastases were the most commonly associated neoplasms, suggesting that the factor(s) responsible for the development of the syndrome are relatively specific for tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract. The cutaneous lesions were erythematous to violaceous in color and had associated scale; the most frequently observed sites of involvement were the ears, nose, hands, and feet, including the nails. In 63% of the cases, the cutaneous lesions preceded the initial symptoms or diagnosis of the tumor by an average of 11 months (range, 1-72) and, in general, the eruption was resistant to a variety of topical treatments. Occasionally, a reappearance of the papulosquamous lesions signaled the recurrence of the tumor (6 cases) or the appearance of skin lesions coincided with the development of metastatic disease (3 cases). In 91% (64/70) of the patients, the skin eruption either improved significantly following treatment of the underlying malignancy or did not improve in the setting of persistent tumor. However, even when all of the skin lesions cleared, the nail dystrophy often persisted. Fifteen of the patients developed vesicles, bullae, and crusts in addition to papulosquamous lesions. Possible explanations include the formation of an epidermal-dermal split via a bullous lichen planus-like mechanism, or the coexistence of two diseases; i.e., acrokeratosis paraneoplastica plus either porphyria cutanea tarda, bullous pemphigoid, or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. One possible explanation for the development of the characteristic cutaneous eruption is an immune reaction, humoral or cellular, directed against a common antigen present on the tumor and the normal skin. Alternatively, tumor production of a keratinocyte growth factor such as TGF-alpha may be involved in the induction of the psoriasiform skin lesions.
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ranking = 16.345438132403
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullosa acquisita, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, acquisita, bullosa
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4/8. Acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa.

    BACKGROUND: We describe a new variant of inherited epidermolysis bullosa and elucidate the clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural features of this condition. OBSERVATIONS: This form of epidermolysis bullosa displays an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, is characterized by acral bullae, and histologically demonstrates suprabasal clefting with acantholysis. Ultrastructural findings are nonspecific but reminiscent of those observed in benign familial pemphigus. CONCLUSION: Acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare but distinct clinicopathologic entity that warrants inclusion in the nosologic classification of epidermolysis bullosa.
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ranking = 23.42102209373
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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5/8. Passive transfer of autoantibodies from a patient with mutilating epidermolysis bullosa acquisita induces specific alterations in the skin of neonatal mice.

    BACKGROUND: epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a subepidermal bullous disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies directed against type VII collagen in anchoring fibrils. These autoantibodies are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of sub-lamina densa blister formation in this disease. OBSERVATIONS: We describe a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita who has developed mutilating acral involvement with early syndactyly and extensive scarring lesions of the scalp. The patient's serum contains IgG autoantibodies that bind the dermal side of 1-mol/L sodium chloride-separated human skin (at a titer up to 5120), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and type VII collagen, as determined by immunoblot. The severity of this patient's disease and the height of his immune response to type VII collagen prompted us to assess the pathogenicity of his autoantibodies in a murine model. Purified IgG from our patient (or that from a healthy volunteer who served as a control) was administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice (10 mg/g of body weight) on 2 consecutive days. light microscopy of normal-appearing skin showed pronounced dermal edema and a dense granulocyte-rich infiltrate in the superficial dermis. Deposits of human IgG, murine C3, and the membrane attack complex of complement were found in the epidermal basement membrane of all experimental mice. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that deposits of human IgG in an experimental subject were localized to anchoring fibrils. serum samples from mice receiving IgG antibodies from our patient had high titers of circulating antibodies directed against the dermal side of 1-mol/L sodium chloride-separated human skin (titer, 640 to 1280). light, immunofluorescence, and immunogold electron microscopic studies did not detect such specific alterations in any control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Acquired autoimmunity to type VII collagen in patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita may result in a clinical phenotype closely resembling that observed in patients with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Passive transfer of purified IgG autoantibodies from a patient with severe epidermolysis bullosa acquisita to BALB/c mice produces histologic and immunopathologic alterations consistent with those seen in patients with this disease.
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ranking = 120.62947604074
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullosa acquisita, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, acquisita, bullosa
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6/8. epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and Crohn's disease.

    A patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) associated with Crohn's disease is presented. The clinical, histological and immunological findings were in keeping with previous reports. However, clinically normal skin and mucosa exhibited deposits of IgG and C3 in the basement-membrane zone. These deposits remained unchanged during the treatment period. It is therefore suggested that immunological mechanisms are implicated in pathogenesis of the disease.
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ranking = 29.480563541225
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullosa acquisita, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, acquisita, bullosa
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7/8. epidermolysis bullosa acquisita occurring in association with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    A 77-year-old retired male physician with a 6-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed a mechanobullous eruption, the features of which were clinically and immunopathologically consistent with a diagnosis of 'classical' epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). As EBA shares immunopathological findings with a number of cases reported as the 'bullous eruption of SLE', the clinical findings commonly recognized as 'classical EBA' may, in patients with SLE, represent a specific subset of the bullous eruption of SLE rather than a separate diagnostic entity. There are few reports in the literature describing classical EBA in patients with SLE. Findings in this patient add further support to the suggestion that EBA occurring in association with SLE, represents a subset of the bullous eruption of SLE, the clinical features of which may be modified by genetic susceptibility or disease activity.
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ranking = 29.480563541225
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullosa acquisita, epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, acquisita, bullosa
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8/8. Sporadic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with concomitant atopic dermatitis.

    We describe a patient with sporadic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa associated with well-documented atopic dermatitis. We discuss this case in relation to a newly described clinical subtype of epidermolysis bullosa known as epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa, a dystrophic variant associated with prominent pruritus. The relations of this case of sporadic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with other dominantly inherited forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa such as the Pasini variant, the pretibial variant, and Bart's syndrome are also discussed. The role of atopic dermatitis in exacerbating dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in this patient raises an important consideration in the care of this group of patients.
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ranking = 27.284803592483
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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