Cases reported "Hand Injuries"

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1/102. Physical therapy after hand injuries.

    The nuances of physical therapy necessary in the trauma patient are discussed. This article also discusses either the treatment of fractures via therapy or the treatment of nerve, tendon, or arterial injuries. It also describes physical therapy guidelines relevant to the patient with hand trauma and reviews communication between the physician and therapist in managing these patients. Intervention concepts are illustrated through case studies of patients with complex hand injuries.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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2/102. Emergency reconstruction of a collateral ligament of a metacarpophalangeal joint using Dacron material.

    We present a case in which an open wound involving the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the little finger was treated by ligament reconstruction using a strip of Dacron material, nerve grafting and coverage by a posterior interosseous artery pedicled flap. At a long term follow-up of 4 years, the joint was stable and had a full range of movement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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3/102. Reversed neurofasciocutaneous flaps based on the superficial branches of the radial nerve.

    Soft-tissue reconstruction of the hand needs to cover the vital structures with flaps. It is usually difficult to maintain function and form with minimal morbidity. Local tissue is preferable but it is also very valuable. Especially in the distal part of the upper extremity, flap coverage is a challenging problem because of limited reconstructive alternatives. On the dorsum of the hand, flaps can be designed based on the paraneural vascular network of the cutaneous sensory nerves. These paraneural vascular networks send branches to the surrounding tissues. The branches to the skin are known as neurocutaneous perforators. The authors used eight reversed neurofasciocutaneous flaps based on the superficial branches of the radial nerve. Six flaps were based on the branch to the index finger and two flaps were based on the branch to the thumb. All flaps survived completely, and successful flap coverage was achieved in all patients with minimal morbidity.
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ranking = 6
keywords = nerve
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4/102. Free medialis pedis flap as a coverage and flow-through flap in hand and digit reconstruction.

    BACKGROUND: skin and soft-tissue defects of the hand and digit present a challenge for the hand surgeon especially in meeting the reconstructive needs of thickness, texture, color matching, and sensation. It becomes an even bigger challenge to reconstruct the defect in a devascularized finger with segmental loss of the neurovascular bundle. We use the relatively new flap, the medialis pedis flap, to solve the above conditions and compare it with traditional flaps. methods: From May of 1994 to March of 1997, the free medialis pedis flap was used to reconstruct 19 digit and hand defects; the flap sizes ranging from 1.5 x 3.0 cm to 3.0 x 9.0 cm. Sixteen flaps were used for simple coverage of digit defects, including 12 for single-digit and 4 for multiple-digit reconstruction. The remaining three flaps were used as coverage and a flow-through flap for devascularized fingers. RESULTS: All 19 flaps survived and achieved a good protective sensation. The appearance was very satisfactory, and the donor-site scars were without sensory problems. CONCLUSION: Compared with traditional flaps, the free medialis pedis has the following advantages: it provides good thickness, texture, and color matching for hand and digit resurfacing; it can be used as a flow-through flap and as coverage for a devascularized finger in a one-stage procedure; the size of the feeding vessels of the flap matches those of the digital vessels well; and it consists of glabrous skin rich in nerve endings, so it has good potential for sensory recovery. Because of all of these characteristics, the free medialis flap may become a better consideration for hand surgeons.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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5/102. Paediatric hand injuries caused by spiked railings.

    We report five cases of hand injuries caused by spiked palisade railings. One patient sustained an open fracture of the distal phalanx with a disruption of the nail bed, and two patients had digital nerve injuries. Two patients presented with the railing still impaled in the fingers, one of whom had an ischaemic digit at presentation. All patients were male, between 9 and 12 years of age, and presented in the course of 1 month. Railings of this type would appear to be a significant cause of hand injuries, which may be prevented by legislation or a change in railing design.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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6/102. Pediatric hand injuries due to home exercycles.

    The clinical presentation and management of 19 children who sustained injuries by stationary exercise bicycles were reviewed retrospectively. These injuries represented 32 traumatized digits with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The index and long fingers were most commonly involved. Wheel-spoke injuries typically produced repairable nerve and tendon lacerations, and full functional recovery in these cases was common. The chain/sprocket injury involved a crushing mechanism and frequently produced severe injury including amputations that were not salvageable. Stationary exercise bicycles represented a predictable source of severe hand injury in children between the ages of 18 months and 5 years. adult supervision was not reliable in preventing contact between an operating exercycle and a child's hand. We recommend that children not be allowed access to any stationary exercycle machinery, whether it is in use or not. safety design considerations should focus on not only shielding the wheel spokes, but also (and perhaps even more important) on enclosing the entire chain axis and gear interface. In addition to these design considerations, public education will be critical in reducing the incidence of injury.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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7/102. Microsurgical reconstruction of the thermally injured upper extremity.

    The use of free flaps for coverage of the deeply burned hand has advantages that include the salvage of the exposed vessels, nerves, tendons, joints, and bone; a single operation to obtain wound closure, minimizing the risk of infection; and earlier physical therapy. This article focuses on the choice of suitable free flaps for the coverage of the deeply burned hand; and it also presents some case reports.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
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8/102. Double-toe transplantation following temporary insertion of a block of silicone for reconstruction of a traumatic metacarpal defect.

    The treatment of the mutilated hand with more than one digit missing and a metacarpal defect is challenging. We used double-toe transfer after temporary insertion of a block of silicone to fill the bony defect.
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ranking = 0.18795539562194
keywords = block
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9/102. Extensor digiti minimi tendon "rerouting" transfer in permanent abduction of the little finger.

    Permanent abduction of the little finger is a bothersome deformity which usually occurs in the context of sequelae of ulnar nerve palsy (Wartenberg's sign), but also in rheumatoid arthritis. The authors report an original technique for correction of this deformity. The extensor digiti minimi tendon is sectioned at its distal insertion and transferred in the wrist through the extensor retinaculum. The "rerouted" tendon is finally resutured distally on the radial aspect of the interosseous muscle. Side-to-side suture of the transferred tendon to the extensor digitorum tendon of the little finger further reinforces the solidity of the procedure. The distal insertion of the extensor digiti minimi tendon is consequently radialized. Its new direction eliminates the abduction component, and the tendon then behaves as an active adductor of the little finger. Five cases (2 cases of ulnar nerve palsy, 3 cases of rheumatoid arthritis) are reported with a mean follow-up of 19 months. All patients have complete active adduction of the little finger in extension, with a persistent capacity for abduction. The other correction techniques published in the literature are discussed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
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10/102. ulnar nerve injuries of the hand producing intrinsic muscle denervation on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Muscle and nerve injuries in the hand may be difficult to detect and diagnose clinically. Two cases are reported in which magnetic resonance imaging showed ulnar nerve injury and intrinsic hand muscle denervation. The clinical, anatomical and radiological features of injury to the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve and associated muscle denervation are discussed and illustrated.
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ranking = 7
keywords = nerve
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